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Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

The approach to sector sampling represented a small change to the approach pursued in 2012, when six sectors were used, in line with the definitions used in the UK Commission’s Working Futures series. The decision to move back to a more detailed 14- sector sampling framework was intended to enable greater granularity in reporting (where there is a demand for such granularity, either because the survey data merit further investigation or in order to inform specific sector or local imperatives and initiatives). It is not always possible to report at this more detailed level, however; in particular, the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing, Mining and Quarrying, and Electricity Gas and Water Supply sectors are small sectors which are represented in the survey through a relatively small number of interviews. Consequently, where the survey reports at a more detailed sector level, it uses a 12 sector grouping which merges these two sectors into a single ‘Primary and Utilities’ sector grouping. The different levels of classification map easily to each other (see Appendix B) and this, combined with the fact that the sample is stratified by sector directly in line with the business population, means that there is great flexibility in our ability to move between the two levels in reporting, satisfying both the need for time series and the drive for more detail / more familiar sector classifications.
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Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

A quarter of establishments (26 per cent) offer training that is designed to lead to a vocational qualification, consistent with the 2012 survey. Most of these employers perceive benefits (both for themselves as employers and for the individuals who achieve the qualifications). However, the barriers that prevent more employers providing training designed to lead to vocational qualifications most commonly relate to issues of supply, such as the fact that they are perceived to be too complicated (reported by 21 per cent of employers who had not arranged or funded training designed to lead to a vocational qualification), and too bureaucratic (20 per cent) and/or to take too long to deliver (19 per cent).
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Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

EPS 2014 gives an insight into the thoughts and behaviour of employers across the UK as they make decisions about how to engage with training providers, schools, colleges and individuals in the wider skills system, to get the skills they need. EPS sits alongside the UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey, which focuses on employer skills demand, skills shortages and training within organisations. The two surveys run in alternate years. This is the third iteration of EPS, which was also carried out in 2010 and 2012. EPS is the successor to the Sector Skills Development Agency (SSDA)’s Employer Survey, carried out in 2002, 2005 and 2008. For more information on the scope of, background to or findings from EPS 2014 or some of its predecessor surveys, see the main report (p. 1- 2).
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Employer Perspectives on Social Networking A Manpower Survey

Employer Perspectives on Social Networking A Manpower Survey

The global results revealed that an overwhelming three out of four employers indicated that their organizations had no formal policy regarding the use of external social networking sites in the workplace. Five percent of employers surveyed indicated they were unsure if their organizations did, in fact, have policies regulating the use of social media by employees.

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UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Scotland results

UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Scotland results

The scale and scope of data collected by the UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011 means that it is a valuable research resource supporting detailed and complex statistical analysis of the inter-relationships between employer characteristics, and their practices and experiences. The findings presented in this report have been produced through a more descriptive exploration of the data. The large base sizes on which the all-Scotland findings are based mean that we can have a good degree of confidence in the patterns that we describe; however as mentioned above subgroup analysis is limited due to smaller sample sizes and this document should not be read as a statistical report. A table showing confidence intervals is shown in Appendix E to give some indicative guidance as to what can be considered a “significant” difference at sub-group level. Throughout the report unweighted base figures are shown on tables and charts to give an indication of the statistical reliability of the figures. These figures are always based on the number of establishments answering a question, as this is the information required to determine
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UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011: England results

UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011: England results

For the vast majority of establishments, demand for skills is met through successful recruitment (or through their current workforce, as will be explored in the next chapter). Four per cent of establishments reported having vacancies at the time of the survey that they were having difficulties filling due to a lack of skills, qualifications or experience in applicants for the role (a “skill-shortage vacancy”). This is slightly higher than the level measured in 2009 (three per cent) and in absolute terms equates to 85,500 vacancies resulting from skill-shortages, again higher than in 2009 (Figure 4.5). However the proportion of all vacancies in England that are caused by skill shortages is 16 per cent, the same level as seen in 2009 (and indeed lower than the level recorded prior to 2009). This suggests that, as with the figures for all hard-to-fill vacancies, the increase seen in the incidence and volume of skill-shortage vacancies can be attributed to the increase in vacancies overall (i.e. as the number of vacancies has risen, the number of skill-shortage vacancies has risen by the same proportion); it is not that the issue of skills shortages in the labour market has become any more concentrated in the past few years, on the whole, but there are areas of the economy which are seeing increased concentrations, as discussed below.
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UK Commission's employer skills survey 2011 : Northern Ireland results

UK Commission's employer skills survey 2011 : Northern Ireland results

The evidence on the value of skills and training investment to individuals, business, and the economy cannot be understated: for example, businesses that don’t train are twice as likely to close down as those that do. Despite this, the UK is losing ground compared to international competitors in terms of its stock of skills, and training by Northern Ireland’s employers has now fallen below 2005 levels. We need to ensure that we develop an ambitious economy, which sees development of the right skills to support the recovery. For the most part the labour market can meet the requirements of employers, but this simple statement masks a number of recruitment difficulties: there are still too many employers lacking the skilled people they require; these deficiencies tend to be persistent through time; despite evidence of businesses trying to grow their workforce, even at this time, employers are finding it difficult to find suitably skilled applicants for all their vacancies. This later point also shows there are still opportunities for workers with the right skills and qualifications regardless of the economic climate.
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Strategic Talent Management Survey Results 2014

Strategic Talent Management Survey Results 2014

“Cranet” a worldwide network of over 40 business schools that conducts comparative research into HRM. She is a Director of “5C”, a global research project conducted with academics from around 30 institutions around the world, examining cultural differences in attitudes towards careers. Emma is a UK representative on the global team for the Centre of Aging and Work at Boston College, USA. Emma has conducted a wide range of research for a number of clients, including the Ministry of Defence, Department of Work and Pensions, National Health Service, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and several private sector organisations.
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UK Employer Skills Survey 2011 : first findings

UK Employer Skills Survey 2011 : first findings

The UK Employer Skills Survey 2011 (UK ESS 2011) is the key UK data source on employer demand for and investment in skills. It is the first UK-wide employer skills survey and is also one of the largest employer skills surveys undertaken in the world with over 87,500 achieved interviews covering large and small businesses in every sector. This ambitious project has brought together the four surveys on skills deficiencies and training that were previously carried out separately in each constituent nation of the UK and represents a significant achievement technically. Compared to the previous surveys run in the nations, this survey includes a wider population of establishments. This means that the results included in this briefing paper are not directly comparable with previous skills surveys undertaken in the constituent nations.
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UK employer skills survey 2011 : first findings

UK employer skills survey 2011 : first findings

The UK Employer Skills Survey 2011 (UK ESS 2011) is the key UK data source on employer demand for and investment in skills. It is the first UK-wide employer skills survey and is also one of the largest employer skills surveys undertaken in the world with over 87,500 achieved interviews covering large and small businesses in every sector. This ambitious project has brought together the four surveys on skills deficiencies and training that were previously carried out separately in each constituent nation of the UK and represents a significant achievement technically. Compared to the previous surveys run in the nations, this survey includes a wider population of establishments. This means that the results included in this briefing paper are not directly comparable with previous skills surveys undertaken in the constituent nations.
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Skills for the workplace : employer perspectives

Skills for the workplace : employer perspectives

Skills challenges are faced internally as well as when recruiting. The employer skills surveys carried out in each of the countries of the UK over the last few years have consistently shown that a key cause of establishments having skill gaps is where staff are new or inexperienced (in NESS 2007 68% of establishments with skills gaps reported this as a cause of at least some of these gaps, compared to only 28% for the next most important reason). It follows that where there is a high turnover of staff an establishment is more likely to have skills challenges / gaps and face high recruitment and vacancy costs. The CIPD Annual Survey Report Recruitment, Retention and Turnover shows that 70% of establishments highlight the loss of staff as having a negative impact on business performance and suggests an average cost of filling a single vacancy of £4,667 and as much as £5,800 when associated labour turnover costs are included) (CIPD, 2008). It is interesting therefore to consider the extent to which employers experience difficulties holding on to (skilled) staff. All employers were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed that holding onto valued staff presented them with a significant problem. Whilst the majority of establishments (63%) do not report difficulties in holding onto valued staff, a significant proportion (28%) do report that the retention of valued staff poses a problem. (This question was not asked in previous waves of this research.)
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UK Parcels Distribution Survey Programme 2014 UK Domestic B2B Parcels UK Domestic B2C Parcels UK Domestic Parcels Delivery Report

UK Parcels Distribution Survey Programme 2014 UK Domestic B2B Parcels UK Domestic B2C Parcels UK Domestic Parcels Delivery Report

The surveys are based on minimum/maximum quota ranges for Primary Carrier usage (i.e. car- rier used most often), in order to guarantee ro- bust results for each of the main carriers. A rat- ing for the next most often used carrier (Secondary Carrier) is also captured, but no quota by carrier is set for them, i.e. these are random.

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The UK Engagement Survey 2014 : The Second Pilot Year

The UK Engagement Survey 2014 : The Second Pilot Year

The results of statistical significance tests have been reported at various points in this report. This is a standard test of confidence that a given result (such as female students reporting a greater frequency of connecting their learning to social issues) is not due to chance. However, statistical significance is sensitive to the number of respondents, and with over 25,000 responses to UKES 2014, very small differences that are of no real practical interest can easily be statistically significant. Therefore, ‘effect size’ has also been reported. Effect size is a method of determining whether a difference is not only reliable (not due to chance), but also big enough to be of practical or substantive importance. Of course, this will often be down to the interests of the reader, but effect size can be a useful guide as to which findings may be of value. Unless stated otherwise, the statistic used to measure effect size is Cramer’s V. Effect sizes are reported as small (0.1–0.3), medium (0.3–0.5) and large (over 0.5); but even small effect sizes indicate the presence of differences that are not only reliable but also substantial enough to be of interest.
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Nephrologists’ perspectives on dialysis treatment: results of an international survey

Nephrologists’ perspectives on dialysis treatment: results of an international survey

In countries such as Australia, Finland and the UK where the uptake of home HD is relatively high, success has been attributed to provision of adequate funding, sup- port, education and training to both service users and ser- vice providers in the use of home HD [17,44,45]. In Australia, nephrologists believed that medical and nursing expertise in home dialysis was good, that home HD was available and supported by most units, and that longer hours and/or more frequent regimens offered outcome advantages [37]. At the Helsinki University Hospital in Finland, adoption of a ‘home first’ policy in predialysis education, close cooperation with other dialysis centres and centralised home HD training to support remote hos- pitals were cited as key factors for establishing an effective home HD programme [44]. Strong clinical leadership ap- pears to be key in the UK, with the need to challenge be- liefs about who might be suitable for home HD emerging as a consistent theme for improving patient access to home HD [45]. Additional considerations for successful home HD programmes, raised by the American Society of Nephrology Dialysis Advisory Group, include: selection of appropriate dialysis machines for the treatment regimen, differences in prescribed regimens e.g. dialysate flow; reli- able vascular access, preferably arteriovenous fistulas; the potential requirement for remote monitoring, and finally, patient burnout necessitating return to ICHD or a period
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your training counts results of the national trainee EXPEriEncE survey, 2014

your training counts results of the national trainee EXPEriEncE survey, 2014

the gaps and weaknesses in trainee induction and orientation identified in this study underscore an urgent need to better support trainees as learners and workers at clinical sites. this need is highlighted by the difference in experience of trainees in ireland versus their uK counterparts. the much higher uK ratings suggest that it is possible to achieve greater trainee satisfaction with induction and orientation processes. the systematic variation in trainee-reported experience of induction is especially concerning; those at earliest stages of learning and practising in the clinical workplace were least likely to report experience of induction and orientation across key domains. this is, in effect, an example of inverse care, since those with arguably the greatest need for induction and orientation appear least likely to receive it. in the case of interns, this is especially important, given some of the issues regarding perceptions of preparedness highlighted elsewhere in the report. there was also systematic variation in induction and orientation by type of clinical site, with trainees reporting poorest experiences at hospitals. the nationally integrated delivery of acute hospital services through the HsE offers an opportunity to implement national-level solutions to the variation in trainee experience of induction and orientation in the hospital setting.
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UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Wales results

UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Wales results

In the six years that elapsed between the surveys much changed in the economic landscape of Wales. Comparison of the survey figures at these two points emphasises the extent to which the 2008 recession affected the labour market in Wales, with vacancy levels still less than two-thirds what they were during the mid-2000s. Logically, with fewer jobs to be had there will be more applicants per position. It therefore follows that proportionately the reduction in the percentage of establishments that are finding any of their vacancies hard-to-fill vacancies is higher than the reduction in vacancies overall. However, it is of note that the proportion experiencing skill-shortage vacancies has not reduced at all, suggesting that there is as much of an issue in finding suitably skilled applicants for positions as there was previously. When viewed as a proportion of those with vacancies, there are in fact more: one in three establishments with vacancies in 2011 were finding any of their vacancies hard to fill due to skill-shortages, compared to one in five in 2005.
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Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

The proportion of employers with any skills gaps, and the proportion of the workforce affected, decreased gradually at UK level between the 2011 and 2015 surveys. This varied by nation, however. The picture in England was relatively static, while the levels of skills gaps in Scotland and Wales fell between 2013 and 2015, when it aligned with the experience among employers in England. Employers in Northern Ireland were the least likely to report a lack of proficiency in their staff:

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UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2013 : UK results, January 2014

UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2013 : UK results, January 2014

Today too many organisations find it hard to recruit the skilled people they need; this poses serious risks to the health and survival of businesses and to their bottom line performance. The survey reveals a sharp rise in skills shortages which may be holding back the UK’s economic recovery. This is not a new phenomenon. Such deficiencies have persisted over time in some sectors and occupations indicating that there is a need to take decisive action. At the same time as a growing shortage of certain skills there is also evidence of a surplus and mismatch in other areas, with the survey finding that almost half of employers report having staff with skills and qualifications beyond those required for their current job. There are also indications of pressures on skills investment. For example, the amount spent on training has fallen by £2.5 billion since 2011. The survey also questions whether UK employers are being ambitious enough when it comes to both investing in their people and their broader business strategies.
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Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

Interestingly, there have been recent developments in the approaches undertaken by employers to develop their staff. The survey points to high and increasing use of e- learning and online training; this is now used by approaching half of employers that train, with recent users more than twice as likely to say its use had increased than to say its use had decreased. This suggests that employers are increasingly turning to innovative and flexible methods of training and developing their staff. This confirms wider research which points to an increase in online or distance learning in the UK. It is often promoted as a way for employers to deliver in house training to their staff, much of which can be done in work time, within the work environment and at the employees own pace, allowing them to gain accreditation and complete modules without having to travel away to training days. The literature also suggests a strong drive towards blended learning, a combination of online and face to face contact (The Economist, 2014).
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UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011 : UK results

UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011 : UK results

The larger the size of the workplace the more likely they are to assess the impact of their training activity, the figure increasing from 59 per cent among establishments that train who have fewer than five staff, up to 82 per cent among those with 250 or more staff. There were noticeable differences by sector, with those operating in Public Administration (80 per cent), Education (78 per cent), Financial Services (77 per cent) and Health and Social Work (75 per cent) all noticeably more likely than average to assess the impact of their training. The majority of establishments in three of these sectors (Public Administration, Education, and Health and Social Work) are government-funded or charities, and there is a marked difference in the likelihood that training activity is formally assessed by whether the establishment is government-funded (78 per cent), a charity / operates in the Voluntary sector (69 per cent) or whether it is profit-seeking (64 per cent). Differences are also apparent by the type of training undertaken: those providing both on- and off-the-job training for their staff over the last 12 months were the most likely to assess the impact of their training (72 per cent). Those providing only off-the-job training were less likely than those providing only on-the-job training to assess its impact (52 per cent and 64 per cent respectively). Although the latter may seem counter-intuitive (in that off-the-job training is more likely to bear a direct cost for the employer), it should be borne in mind that those whose training activity was restricted to exclusively off-the-job training modes were particularly likely to be the smallest establishments with fewer than five staff, whereas those training both on- and off-the-job were much larger than average. The pattern described by mode of training provided is as found in previous employer skills studies, including NESS 2009 in England.
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