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Employer Skills Survey 2015:
Wales Report

Employer Skills Survey 2015: Wales Report

During the sampling and weighting process, each establishment was allocated to one of 15 sectors, based on their Standard Industrial Classification (SIC). SIC 2007 was used to classify establishments using the following method. Using the four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) supplied for each record from the Experian database, a description of business activity was read out to each respondent. If they agreed that this description matched the main activity undertaken at the establishment, then the SIC on Experian’s database was assumed to be correct. If however, the respondent felt the description did not correspond to their main business activity at the site (which about a quarter reported), a verbatim response was collected to find out what they do (see question A7 on the survey; questionnaire shown in the accompanying Technical Report). At the analysis stage this was coded to a four-digit SIC which was then used as the basis for allocation into sector. For the purposes of reporting, Mining & Quarrying were merged with Manufacturing to create ‘Manufacturing’, while Transport and storage and Information and Communications were merged to create ‘Transport, storage and communications’. The final sector, which in previous iterations of the survey has been classified as ‘Other Community, Social and Personal Services’, has been renamed to ‘Arts, Entertainment, Recreation and Other Service activities’, in line with ONS guidance.
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UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Scotland results

UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Scotland results

The scale and scope of data collected by the UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011 means that it is a valuable research resource supporting detailed and complex statistical analysis of the inter-relationships between employer characteristics, and their practices and experiences. The findings presented in this report have been produced through a more descriptive exploration of the data. The large base sizes on which the all-Scotland findings are based mean that we can have a good degree of confidence in the patterns that we describe; however as mentioned above subgroup analysis is limited due to smaller sample sizes and this document should not be read as a statistical report. A table showing confidence intervals is shown in Appendix E to give some indicative guidance as to what can be considered a “significant” difference at sub-group level. Throughout the report unweighted base figures are shown on tables and charts to give an indication of the statistical reliability of the figures. These figures are always based on the number of establishments answering a question, as this is the information required to determine
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UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011 : UK results

UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011 : UK results

For the first time, this survey introduced an experimental question to look at how employers perceived potential under-use of skills in the workplace. This single question led to half of UK establishments (49 per cent) reporting having at least one employee with both qualifications and skills that are more advanced than required for their current role. In volume terms, this is 4.5 million employees (16 per cent total UK workforce). It should be noted that this indicative finding requires more investigation and follow-up work, and was reached in a single question, rather than an established suite of questions, as for skills gaps. However, the early indications we can glean from it show that under-use of skills is an issue that employers understand and can recognise in their workforce. This inevitably has consequences for the overall productivity of the UK economy as a whole. The other area investigated in this chapter was retention issues faced in Northern Ireland, England and Wales (no data for this section is available in Scotland). Overall, five per cent of establishments in these three nations reported having difficulties retaining staff. Employers operating in the Hotels and Restaurants sector were the most likely to experience retention difficulties. The main issues cited as being reasons for problems with retention were a lack of interest in the type of work in question; and a lack of career progression. As with skill-shortage vacancies and skills gaps, the most commonly cited impact of retention issues was an impact on other staff, particularly a strain on management or other staff covering the shortage.
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UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011: England results

UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011: England results

The scale and scope of data collected by the UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011 means that it is a valuable research resource supporting detailed and complex statistical analysis of the inter-relationships between employer characteristics, and their practices and experiences. The findings presented in this report have been produced through a more descriptive exploration of the data. The large base sizes on which most of the findings are based mean that we can have a good degree of confidence in the patterns that we describe; the document should not be read as a statistical report, however. A table showing confidence intervals is shown in Appendix G to give some indicative guidance as to what can be considered a “significant” difference at sub-group level. Throughout the report unweighted base figures are shown on tables and charts to give an indication of the statistical reliability of the figures. These figures are always based on the number of establishments answering a question, as this is the information required to determine statistical reliability. Therefore, where percentages are based on “all vacancies”, the base figure quoted is the number of establishments with vacancies. As a general convention throughout the report, figures with a base size of fewer than 25 establishments are not reported (with a double asterisk, “**”, displayed instead), and figures with a base size of 25 to 49 are italicised with a note of caution.
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Learner Voice Wales Survey 2015 results

Learner Voice Wales Survey 2015 results

contained fewer questions, simplified wording and used a different response scale than the core survey, meaning that the data cannot be combined and Easy Read results need to be reported separately. Use of the Easy Read survey was at the discretion of providers, who were advised only to adopt it for learners who could not complete the relevant sector survey without significant support. It was not used by all learners with learning difficulties or disabilities, whose first language was not English or Welsh or had low numeracy and/or literacy skills.

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UK Commission's employer skills survey 2011 : Northern Ireland results

UK Commission's employer skills survey 2011 : Northern Ireland results

In this report, economic and other activities are primarily described in terms of 14 sectors, defined by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC), for more information see Appendix C 7 ; these sectors are shown in Figure 2.2 below. Most of these sectors are dominated by commercially-focused organisations whose aim is to generate profit. However, each of the sectors will also include a proportion of establishments whose motivation is more social and/or which operate under funding from local or central government. In a small number of sectors, the majority of establishments operate outside of a commercial imperative, such, as Public Administration, Education and Health and Social Work 8 . The greatest numbers of Northern Ireland establishments operate in Wholesale and Retail (18 per cent), Business Services (14 per cent) and Construction (12 per cent). By contrast, the Electricity, Gas & Water Supply (one per cent) and Finance Services (three per cent) sectors account for very small proportions of establishments in Northern Ireland. The number of establishments and their size profile differ greatly by sector. The Construction, Community, Social and Personal Service activities and the Agriculture sectors are dominated by small establishments. This is illustrated in Figure 2.2, which shows that these sectors contain a much larger share of establishments than employees (for example, 12 per cent of Northern Ireland’s establishments were part of the Construction sector but only five per cent of employees work in this sector). The Manufacturing, Health and Social Work, Public Administration and Education sectors were dominated by larger employers. As Figure 2.2 shows, these sectors contain a relatively small share of Northern Ireland’s establishments compared with their share of workers. For instance, the Health and Social Work contains eight per cent of establishments but 15 per cent of workers. The Health & Social Work, Public Administration and Education sectors were also dominated by establishments which rely on public funding.
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UK employer skills survey 2011 : first findings

UK employer skills survey 2011 : first findings

Employers were asked for their views on the work readiness of those recruited straight from education. Around a quarter of respondents (24 per cent) had recruited someone straight from education in the two to three years prior to the survey. Most of them found these recruits to be well prepared for work. However, their perceptions of the work readiness of different sub-groups of labour market entrants varied quite considerably. In England, Northern Ireland and Wales 3 almost three in five recruiting 16 year school leavers found them to be well prepared (59 per cent), rising to 64 per cent of those recruiting 17-18 year olds from school, 72 per cent of those recruiting from Further Education and 82 per cent of those recruiting from Higher Education establishments finding them well prepared.
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UK Employer Skills Survey 2011 : first findings

UK Employer Skills Survey 2011 : first findings

Employers were asked for their views on the work readiness of those recruited straight from education. Around a quarter of respondents (24 per cent) had recruited someone straight from education in the two to three years prior to the survey. Most of them found these recruits to be well prepared for work. However, their perceptions of the work readiness of different sub-groups of labour market entrants varied quite considerably. In England, Northern Ireland and Wales 3 almost three in five recruiting 16 year school leavers found them to be well prepared (59 per cent), rising to 64 per cent of those recruiting 17-18 year olds from school, 72 per cent of those recruiting from Further Education and 82 per cent of those recruiting from Higher Education establishments finding them well prepared.
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Evaluation of the Employer Ownership of Skills Pilot, Round 1: final report

Evaluation of the Employer Ownership of Skills Pilot, Round 1: final report

We now turn to consider non-QCF training. Our control group in this case is derived from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), and in particular from 7 waves of the LFS 5-quarter longitudinal sample (January-March 2014 to January-March 2015, April-June 2014 to April-June 2015 etc., up to July-September 2015 to July-September 2016). This time period roughly coincides with the EOP. We take individuals observed to be in training (defined as being in education or training connected to work in the 4 weeks prior to the survey) in wave 1 of their LFS responses, but not in training in wave 2. This ensures their wage observed in wave 5 is around 1 year after the training has finished, as in the EOP survey structure. Note that this does not imply that their training is necessarily short – they could have been in training for a while before first observed in wave 1. Note also that they may start another period of training in wave 3, but this option is also available to EOP learners. For our control group of trainees, the ‘before’ wage is their wave 1 wage while the ‘after’ wage is their wave 5 wage, so that the LFS control group wages are always 1 year apart.
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The 2015 Report: Employer Branding in Singapore The Good, The Bad & The Ugly

The 2015 Report: Employer Branding in Singapore The Good, The Bad & The Ugly

With the Fair Consideration Framework already in full effect, the war for Talent in Singapore is only set to become more intense. A survey by Robert Walters found that both the private and public sectors are even looking overseas to lure expat Singaporeans back home to work.

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National Survey of Adult Skills in Wales 2010

National Survey of Adult Skills in Wales 2010

in the first report 9 of the Wales Employment and Skills Board (WESB) 10 . Both of these supported the commitment of the then Welsh Assembly Government to providing funding and support for Adult Basic Skills, including promoting the Employer Pledge 11 . In July 2010, the correlation between literacy and numeracy levels amongst the working population and economic development was drawn in a new programme for economic renewal 12 , which set out a commitment ensuring schools, colleges and universities equip young people with the basics of literacy and numeracy required for the workplace. The Plan also prioritised the Basic Skills Employer Pledge as a means to “help employers tackle the costs and wasted potential arising from low levels of literacy and numeracy in the workforce. 13 ” However, despite the aspiration of One Wales 14 to promote Wales as a “bilingual and multicultural nation” 15 , there has been less of a strategic emphasis on the
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UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2013 : UK results, January 2014

UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2013 : UK results, January 2014

The main obstacle to (more) young people getting new jobs is competition in the market place. Half of recruiting employers who had not recruited young job applicants had opted instead for older candidates who were better placed; in this instance young people who applied for these jobs may have been suitable, but the recruiters opted for a candidate over the age of 25 to fill the role. Where young applicants were not considered to meet the requirements of the role, the main reasons cited were lack of skills and experience, and sometimes both. Three in five recruiting employers (61 per cent) who had not recruited a young person said they had had no applications from young people. The reasons why some young people were not successful in their job applications mirrored the reasons why some employers were disappointed with the preparedness of recruits entering the job market in their first roles since leaving education. Most employers find the education leavers they take on to be well or very well prepared for work, although as many as four in ten employers taking on school leavers at 16 from schools in England, Northern Ireland or Wales described the recruits as poorly prepared (as do three in ten employers in Scotland taking new recruits from Scottish schools between the ages of 16 and 18).
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Skills for the workplace : employer perspectives

Skills for the workplace : employer perspectives

Skills challenges are faced internally as well as when recruiting. The employer skills surveys carried out in each of the countries of the UK over the last few years have consistently shown that a key cause of establishments having skill gaps is where staff are new or inexperienced (in NESS 2007 68% of establishments with skills gaps reported this as a cause of at least some of these gaps, compared to only 28% for the next most important reason). It follows that where there is a high turnover of staff an establishment is more likely to have skills challenges / gaps and face high recruitment and vacancy costs. The CIPD Annual Survey Report Recruitment, Retention and Turnover shows that 70% of establishments highlight the loss of staff as having a negative impact on business performance and suggests an average cost of filling a single vacancy of £4,667 and as much as £5,800 when associated labour turnover costs are included) (CIPD, 2008). It is interesting therefore to consider the extent to which employers experience difficulties holding on to (skilled) staff. All employers were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed that holding onto valued staff presented them with a significant problem. Whilst the majority of establishments (63%) do not report difficulties in holding onto valued staff, a significant proportion (28%) do report that the retention of valued staff poses a problem. (This question was not asked in previous waves of this research.)
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High Performance Working in the Employer Skills Surveys

High Performance Working in the Employer Skills Surveys

The analysis in this report is based on the UK-wide data files for the UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011 and Employer Perspectives Survey 2007. In 2011, in order to maintain a reasonable interview length, establishments in the sample outside of Scotland were randomly allocated to two modules, and only those in the first module (and all establishments in Scotland) were asked questions relating to HPW. These are marked with an asterisk in Table 2.1. In addition, the 2011 data file includes responses from establishments with one or more people working at them, whereas the 2007 EPS sample is of establishments with two or more people working at them. In order to ensure comparability with the population covered by the 2007 survey, the descriptive analysis excludes establishments with just one person working at them. The unweighted base size for the HPW questions in the 2011 sample was 44,691; slightly over half the total sample. The HPW and related indicators in the 2011 survey can be grouped into sets of practices. The analysis undertaken for this project, including assessing the correlations between practice use, is based on three main groups of practices: work organisation (opportunities for employee involvement and participation); skills acquisition (training and development); and motivation enhancement (incentives to perform in line with the organisation’s objectives) (Appelbaum et al. 2000; Kalleberg et al. 2006; de Menezes and Wood 2006). These groupings align well with the 4As model identified above. Only one practice (Equal opportunities policy) relates to the Access category. The remaining three areas (application, attitude and ability) correspond reasonably closely to employee involvement, motivational practices and skills acquisition respectively.
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Refugee Students Needs Assessment Survey Report 2015

Refugee Students Needs Assessment Survey Report 2015

 Refugee youth in H.S. tend to succeed in Math and struggle in the core subjects that require more advanced English skills (such as: Science, History and English courses) The statement "Refugee students understand the importance of academic success" is vague as it depends on the culture of the refugee student. Most Karen, Karen, etc. (Burmese refugee) students have a very strong understanding of the importance of academic success and are more prepared thanks to their schooling in refugee camps in Thailand. However, many Somali and East-African students do not understand the importance of academic success as education services in many camps in Africa are limited - not to mention Somalia's civil instability has rendered many individuals born after the 1970's illiterate. A select number of very motivated refugee students know how to find academic support when they need it. However, I believe the limiting factor is that there simply are not enough academic supports in place at schools like Crawford & Mann to meet the demand. "There is a system in place to properly assign newly resettled refugee
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Education, skills and productivity: commissioned research first joint special report of the Business, Innovation and Skills and Education Committees of session 2015-16 second special report of the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee of session 2015-

Education, skills and productivity: commissioned research first joint special report of the Business, Innovation and Skills and Education Committees of session 2015-16 second special report of the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee of session 2015-16; third special report of the Education Committee of session 2015-16

One comparable measure of underemployment of graduate skills across countries derives from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey which asks if respondents possess the skills to carry out more demanding duties than they are given in their jobs. The proportion of graduates replying yes to this question only fell below 25% in four of the 27 countries participating in the survey. In Germany the proportion so responding was just above 30%; in France and the UK it was just above 40% (CIPD, 2015). Possible explanations for the wide extent of apparent underemployment of graduate skills include post-recession labour market weakness in some countries and technological factors which affect all countries such as high-level skills not being needed for ICT utilisation as much as they were for ICT adoption (Chun, 2003). In addition, many developments in ICTs make them both easier to use and capable of de-skilling or displacing previously demanding graduate jobs (Beaudry et al, 2013).
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The Welsh Government response to the report of the
task and finish group on music services in Wales : November 2015

The Welsh Government response to the report of the task and finish group on music services in Wales : November 2015

It is inconceivable that a nation renowned for its musical heritage should neglect its musicians of the future. Musicians who will perform on the national and international stage, many for whom the opportunity to learn an instrument in school has been their first experience of making music, are being nurtured by our music services right now. Others who have the opportunity to learn but choose not to pursue music at a high level will benefit from new skills,

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Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

The UK Commission’s Employer Perspectives Survey provides insight into the thoughts and behaviour of UK employers on a range of issues relating to their use of, and engagement with, the skills system. Whilst the high level findings have been summarised in this report, it is important to emphasise that the survey itself provides a vast resource of information for those wanting to better understand employer motivations and behaviour in the area of skills development. There is a wealth of data available that have not been discussed in this report that will allow the information to be analysed in a more granular way (cutting more findings for example by size, sector and geography). Policy makers, practitioners and researchers are encouraged to explore the underpinning data tables. In this concluding section we now turn to bring together the top level findings as a whole and consider their implications for all those involved in helping businesses better recruit, train and develop their people. To do this we focus on a number of key areas in the conclusion, namely:
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Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

This can be explained to some extent by the fact that this is the most prevalent occupation across establishments, and there is a natural narrowing of the ladder as it reaches the top, meaning that the number of people who can continue to climb is limited. Furthermore, as individuals assume positions of management, they can commonly cease to need to utilise some of the more technical skills and qualifications that they have previously acquired (e.g. skills and qualifications that relate to the core service that their organisation provides). If they, or their employer, perceives these technical or service- related skills and qualifications to be “more advanced” than needed for their managerial role, then they may report this rise up the job ladder as reflecting under-utilisation of the full repertoire of their skills. It is also worth noting that, particularly within smaller establishments, the respondent is likely to be at management level, and individuals may be more likely to identify their own skills and qualifications as beyond those needed for their role.
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Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

For those respondents unable to give even a salary range, a method was used to determine whether they pay salaries above or below the average, and to what degree. This took into account the establishment’s location and evidence from other salary questions on the datasheet. Where exact answers had been given for other salary questions, a ratio was calculated between their actual answer and the London/non-London mean (as appropriate) for that question. This gave a ratio that expressed the degree to which that employer over- paid or under-paid employees in the roles discussed, compared with the mean. Where salary answers were missing (and no range information was provided) the assigned value would be calculated as the London or non-London mean multiplied by the ratio of a related question for that establishment. The ratio selected was different for each question and dependent on which questions were adjudged to be the most closely related. This enabled the estimate to be either up-weighted or down-weighted in keeping with their pay for other roles.
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