Top PDF eRegistries: Electronic registries for maternal and child health

eRegistries: Electronic registries for maternal and child health

eRegistries: Electronic registries for maternal and child health

Shortage of care providers in LMIC severely constrains availability, quality and efficiency of RMNCH services (Frame 2). Resources are wasted not only by underutiliz- ing the time-saving benefits of electronic applications discussed here, but also by inefficiencies such as clients missing scheduled appointments or unneeded variation in daily work-load [80]. Likewise, systems become in- efficient in providing adequate care when they are un- aware of the time and location at which clients will require care. Optimizing the efficiency of the work force has therefore been a key element in many de- ployments of e- and mHealth programs in LMIC, including functionalities ranging from simple elec- tronic scheduling, or household visit support with geographic information systems, to integration of messaging services to create mobile phone reminders about upcoming antenatal care visits, missed sched- uled appointments, new deliveries and newborns eli- gible for postpartum and newborn care [31, 32, 86].
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eRegistries: indicators for the WHO Essential Interventions for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health

eRegistries: indicators for the WHO Essential Interventions for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health

Improvement of data collection is ongoing in many countries with the advent of electronic methods of data collection, including electronic medical records to re- place paper-based systems. The eRegistries Initiative aims to support a safe and efficient transition to inte- grated electronic health information systems in LMIC [4, 5] (Frost M, Hodne Titlestad O, Lewis J, Mehl G, Frøen JF: eRegistries: Architecture and Free Open Source Software for maternal and child health Registries, submit- ted). eRegistries should collect and manage information that is adapted both to the health system’s information needs, as well as the data collection and real-time analysis methodology. Many existing indicators for monitoring health have been designed and constructed to be reliably measured from household and facility surveys [6, 7]; for example, breastfeeding rates for children <6 months of age. While these surveys are critical for national and global monitoring needs [8], the historically weak data- collection capabilities of LMIC [9, 10] render the utility of such indicators limited in the context of the current global transition to more robust health information systems.
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eRegistries: governance for electronic maternal and child health registries

eRegistries: governance for electronic maternal and child health registries

At the 2014 Maternal and Child Health Summit, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim proclaimed, “Our vision is to register every single pregnancy and every sin- gle birth by 2030” [1]. As the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) era draws to a close and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) are ushered in, a shift to- wards long-term investments, sustainable strategies, and infrastructure development have emerged as new prior- ities [2, 3]. Growing support for strengthening civil registration and vital statistics [4–6] and the call for more and better maternal health data in 2010 by leader- ship in eight global health agencies [7] all point to the need to improve data collection strategies in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Against this backdrop, in June 2015 the World Health Organization (WHO), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and the World Bank released The Roadmap for Measurement and Accountability and Post-2015 5- Point Call to Action that highlight strategies for improv- ing data collection, analysis, access, and use [8]. The dearth of timely and accurate maternal and child health data has limited countries’ ability to measure progress in reducing maternal and child deaths worldwide but has galvanized leaders [9–11] and funders [12, 13] to prioritize strategies to acquire high quality maternal and child health data.
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Progress along developmental tracks for electronic health records implementation in the United States

Progress along developmental tracks for electronic health records implementation in the United States

While this ten-year goal is most likely unrealistic, these efforts promise to develop electronic health records for every American that would be transferable to any health services provider. Furthermore, with increasing healthcare disparities and the 2008–2009 global economic crisis, U.S. President Barack Obama signed into law the Ameri- can Recovery and Reinvestment Plan of 2009 on February 17. Title IX (Labor, Health and Human Services, and Edu- cation) of this $787 billion (U.S.) plan includes $20 bil- lion to implement electronic health records systems and to train healthcare workers to use these systems [8]. To date, the development of such records has proceeded along four primary tracks: (a) Development of immuniza- tion registries and linkage with other health records to produce electronic child health profiles (CHP), (b) Local and regional hospital system demonstration projects to link together patient medical records, (c) Insurance com- pany projects linked to ICD-9 codes and patient records for cost-benefit assessments, and (d) Consortium groups sharing experiences and modeling of systems require- ments and standards for data linkage. This paper will describe these four developmental tracks, the legal envi- ronment/implications of their implementation, and future projections for their expansion across health net- works in the United States.
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Medical databases in studies of drug teratogenicity: methodological issues

Medical databases in studies of drug teratogenicity: methodological issues

Abstract: More than half of all pregnant women take prescription medications, raising con- cerns about fetal safety. Medical databases routinely collecting data from large populations are potentially valuable resources for cohort studies addressing teratogenicity of drugs. These include electronic medical records, administrative databases, population health registries, and teratogenicity information services. Medical databases allow estimation of prevalences of birth defects with enhanced precision, but systematic error remains a potentially serious problem. In this review, we first provide a brief description of types of North American and European medical databases suitable for studying teratogenicity of drugs and then discuss manifestation of system- atic errors in teratogenicity studies based on such databases. Selection bias stems primarily from the inability to ascertain all reproductive outcomes. Information bias (misclassification) may be caused by paucity of recorded clinical details or incomplete documentation of medication use. Confounding, particularly confounding by indication, can rarely be ruled out. Bias that either masks teratogenicity or creates false appearance thereof, may have adverse consequences for the health of the child and the mother. Biases should be quantified and their potential impact on the study results should be assessed. Both theory and software are available for such estimation. Provided that methodological problems are understood and effectively handled, computerized medical databases are a valuable source of data for studies of teratogenicity of drugs.
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Differences in reporting of maternal and child health indicators: A comparison between routine and survey data in Guizhou Province, China

Differences in reporting of maternal and child health indicators: A comparison between routine and survey data in Guizhou Province, China

The number of live births (94) was larger than the number of infants (88) in the routine data for the rural area (Table 4). There was a difference in number of live births in both the rural and urban areas, ie, live births in the survey data (68) was fewer than in the routine data (94) in the rural area, but live births in the survey data (106) was larger than in the routine data (96) in the urban area (Table 4). Because the number of live births is the denominator for the mortality and hospital delivery rate, over-reporting of live births is the reason for the lower hospital delivery rate in the rural area. Most statistics in the coverage indicators of maternal and child health interven- tions were over-reported in the routine data. In the urban area, all indicators showed discrepancies between the routine data and survey data, except for the number of maternal deaths (0) and management rate of high-risk pregnant women (100%). We found one missing maternal death in the rural area and four missing child deaths in two study areas, three of which were neonatal deaths. Table 4 shows the differences between the routine data and survey data for the selected indicators.
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Effect of mother’s education on child’s nutritional status in the slums of Nairobi

Effect of mother’s education on child’s nutritional status in the slums of Nairobi

The study was carried out in two urban informal settle- ments of Korogocho and Viwandani in Nairobi, Kenya. The study was nested within the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System (NUHDSS) run by the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC). The NUHDSS follows a population of slightly more than 60,000 people; 57 % and 43 % from Viwandani and Korogocho slum respectively. The follow up com- prises of a systematic quarterly recording of vital demo- graphic events including births, deaths and migrations occurring among residents of all households in Korogocho and Viwandani since 2003. Other data that is collected includes: household assets, morbidity, and education which is also collected and updated regularly. The two slum areas are densely populated, and characterized by high unemployment rates, lack of a basic infrastructure, poor housing, violence, insecurity, and poor health indi- cators [8,25]. The two slums are heterogeneous particu- larly with regards to socio-economic status: Viwandani has relatively higher levels of education and employment, high mobility of residents and split households while the population in Korogocho is more stable with greater co-residence of spouses.
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Utilization Of Maternal And Child Health Services In State Of Jharkhand, India: Role Of Socio Economic And Regional Correlates

Utilization Of Maternal And Child Health Services In State Of Jharkhand, India: Role Of Socio Economic And Regional Correlates

India being a large and diverse country exhibits greater regional disparities in terms of socio-economic development. Policy makers and planners must focus at regional perspective in order to attain overall development. However, results of the study does not clearly exhibit role of region in determining maternal and child health care utilization. Child immunization is comparatively higher in south, west and northern region than the north eastern region. Western region is insignificantly related to child immunization. Similarly, southern, northern and central region show higher probability of utilizing safe delivery care compared with north eastern region. In this case, western region is not significantly related to safe delivery care. These results could be explained with a prism of different level of socio-economic development. North eastern region covering Pakur, Sahibganj, Godda, Giridih and Deoghar districts exhibits high level of rural poverty. Role of mass media is another significant variable affecting utilization of maternal and child health care. Results show that safe delivery and contraceptive use increases with greater exposure to any type of mass media. However, ANC and child immunization are not significantly related with mass media exposure. A study conducted in Kolkata metropolitan area shows mass media has a positive bearing on health seeking behaviour (Partha et al., 2002). Any type of mass media such as T.V., radio, newspaper keeps women aware about importance of health, available facilities at nearby health centers, government policies and programmes.
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Abstract- Maternal and child health care center is developing form of Purnama or Mandiri maternal and child health care that

Abstract- Maternal and child health care center is developing form of Purnama or Mandiri maternal and child health care that

The plan here means all things about how things are well-planned, goals determinations, and plan to change. Based on the data above, 126 (100%) respondents have done the activity of maternal and child health care center. Unfortunately, those plans are not balanced with the goals in the active management, that is 94 respondents or 74,61% respondents said that there is no goals determination in plans. This case will cause the infectivity of maternal and child health care center management in term of plans which then affects activity’s failure. Similar to the previous case, the change of plans, while the activity is ongoing, will also cause its failure. 59 respondents or 46,83% respondents said that the structured planned in the first is chanced due to the evaluation after the activity conducted. To make the maternal and child health care center management effective in its utility, there must be good plans so that the organization plans can find obvious goals based on their capability.
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THE CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM IN MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH

THE CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM IN MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH

local, national, state, or international level; (2) teaching positions in medical school pediatric departments or in maternal and child health departments in schools of public health; (3[r]

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Managing Early Detectionof Mothers with High-Risk Pregnancy by Health Surveillance Workers for Maternal and Child Health in Declining Maternal Mortality in Semarang City

Managing Early Detectionof Mothers with High-Risk Pregnancy by Health Surveillance Workers for Maternal and Child Health in Declining Maternal Mortality in Semarang City

Organization can give positive effects in encouraging and supervising early detection of high -risk pregnancy. Several hindering factors in achieving the target are that Gasurk es KIA rarely communicate each other, cooperate with regional cadres and village stakeholders,and lack of knowledge and attitude. External hindering factors are the far and elite domicile, lack of information, and reluctance of maternal check. If mothers live in elite housing area, Gasurk es KIA often get difficulties to visit them. Sometimes, some cadres lack of information about new laboring mother. If mothers live far away and cannot access where antenatal care is conducted. Also, mothers never do maternal check-up in primary healthcare centers or the nearest hospital. The previous study also shows the same that there is a relationship between knowledge and encouragement from the health workers towards early detection of high-risk pregnancy. 8
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Status of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) in Telangana

Status of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) in Telangana

Telangana state has inherited the demographic transition that undivided state of Andhra Pradesh had witnessed during the 1990s and 2000s (see CESS, 2008; Dev et al., 2009). The fertility rate in the undivided state had declined to little below replacement level (i.e. 2) by the turn of 21st century and continued to be so thereafter. The estimates of third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3) have shown that the fertility rate of undivided Andhra Pradesh in 2005-06 was 1.8 (children per women in the reproductive age) and the recent NFHS-IV (2015-16) estimates indicate the same. Its achievements in family planning leading to fertility transition that ultimately resulted in low population growth considered as demographic transition, is well appreciated. But its performance in many aspects of health outcomes is still far behind in respect of required or ideal situation / outcomes and when compared to some other states. It was observed that the disproportionately-high focus on family planning towards population stabilization in the undivided Andhra Pradesh since 1970s had diluted the focus / emphasis on maternal health (see Prakasamma, 2009).
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Performance-based incentives may be appropriate to address challenges to delivery of prevention of vertical transmission of HIV services in rural Mozambique: a qualitative investigation

Performance-based incentives may be appropriate to address challenges to delivery of prevention of vertical transmission of HIV services in rural Mozambique: a qualitative investigation

All cadres were dissatisfied with the current form, amount, or timeliness of compensation. Nearly all community-based workers held another job, predom- inantly subsistence farming, to support themselves. While one activista and one CHW noted they were happy to receive any monetary compensation for work they had previously performed uncompensated, TBAs were uncompensated for referring women for facility-based care but had previously been compen- sated for assisting in home deliveries (e.g., gifts from mothers, food staples from health facility). Activistas and TBAs reported that additional money would help to offset travel costs to and from patients ’ homes. However, one highly intrinsically motivated nurse did not believe an increase in remuneration would affect nurse performance:
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Reproductive and child health

Reproductive and child health

state in which “People have the ability to reproduce and regulate their fertility; women are able to go through pregnancy and childbirth safely, the outcome of pregnancy is successful in terms of maternal and infant survival and well Available online at http://www.journalcra.com

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Under utilisation of maternal and child health care

Under utilisation of maternal and child health care

Here prim iparas and breastr-f eeding mothers saw the h e a lth v is it o r as .most .helpful.. The most in te re s tin g c la s s -re la te d trend was a good i n i t i a l attendance and apparent . i n i t i a l s a tis fa c tio n ’ by. mothers: in Lower ...socioeconomic, groups, w ith a subsequent f a ilu r e to re tu rn and a drop in s a tis fa c tio n .le v e ls a fte r ..the f i r s t few postnatal months. I t seems that-m o thers both attended and appreciated the c lin ijc i f : (a) they saw. i t as both re le v a n t and im portant, and (b) they perceived i t s r o le as not e a s ily f u l f i l l e d elsewhere. A c r it ic a l question would, th e re fo re , concern maternal perceptions of th e h e alth v is it o r 's r o le and of her re la tio n s h ip to o th er sources of h ealth education and advice. Mothers saw a wide range of fu n ctio n s fo r the c h ild h e alth c lin ic s , eg weighing c h ild re n , discussing baby's progress, discussing problems,, meeting other mothers, buying m ilk and baby foods. Regarding maternal a ttitu d e s to h e a lth v is ito r s , the psychological and p ra c tic a l importance of th e ir work was acknowledged by many mothers. Those who n e ith e r attended nor 'a p p re c ia te d ' the h ealth v is it o r had doubts about these fu n c tio n s . They saw c lin ic ro le s as b e tte r performed elsewhere, eg they weighed th e ir babies a t the c h em ist's, discussed progress and problems w ith th e ir own doctor, and saw th e ir frie n d s as a b e tte r so cial o u tle t than casual c lin ic acquaintances. Another very s ig n ific a n t fa c to r a ffe c tin g uptake and s a tis fa c tio n was th e experience of one or more 'd is tre s s in g ' in c id e n ts . These in c id e n ts were in v a ria b ly ones, in which the mother was m a d e .to .fe e l g u ilt y , inadequate or embarrassed because of her apparent i n a b ilit y to care fo r her. baby.
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Maternal health and child mortality in rural India

Maternal health and child mortality in rural India

proportion of mothers suffering from at least one of these diseases is over 2.4%. Now, if we compare the disease profile of dead children under the age of 5 years with those who are alive, we find the difference of per 1000 corresponding figures negative. We can observe that difference is -2.69, -4.34, -3.89, -0.78 and -12.03 per 1000 for TB, asthma, diabetes, thyroid and at least one of these, respectively. The negative sign here suggests that prevalence of diseases are higher for those children who die as compared to those who still alive. Next, Table 2 also shows that per 1000 difference between underweight mothers of alive and dead children is about -16. This means the proportion of underweight mothers is higher for the children who died. Furthermore, if we compare the anemic level of mothers of alive children and those of dead children we find that former has more number per 1000 with no anemia or mild anemia while later are in majority for sever and moderate anemia level. Pearson chi-square test for independence of discrete health categories and child mortality suggests that except for thyroid health category, the null hypothesis is rejected and indicates for possible dependency relationships.
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It Is Time! Accelerating the Use of Child Health Information Systems to Improve Child Health

It Is Time! Accelerating the Use of Child Health Information Systems to Improve Child Health

Rosenbaum and colleagues describe the evolving le- gal framework, as lawmakers, regulators, and policy- makers seek to apply the existing, well-developed body of law regarding health information privacy to the new HIT environment. For example, as the authors point out, large proportions of privacy rights, health care, and med- ical practice law are state-based. However, as the need increases for electronic information about health and health care to cross state lines, the need for adaptations in the current state-based law arises. Furthermore, the issue of health information privacy takes on an added dimension when children are involved. Controversies over children’s legal right to control health information have already emerged, regarding both the existence of any right and state-to-state variations in rights. Rosen- baum and colleagues describe the issues and the current state of this evolving legal framework to support HIT.
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Child Health Care Policy and Delivery in France

Child Health Care Policy and Delivery in France

Is the current French system of Maternal and Child Health responsible for the good health of today's children.. This question is addressed.[r]

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Healthy Steps: A Case Study of Innovation in Pediatric Practice

Healthy Steps: A Case Study of Innovation in Pediatric Practice

Teachable moments involve using experiences and questions that occur in the context of the visit to provide an opportunity for discussion, the explora- tion of parental feelings, modeling positive interac- tions, reframing negative parental attributions about their child, and providing specific information. A teachable moment capitalizes on the parent’s imme- diate issues and concerns, when there is an increased desire to learn, rather than a preset list of anticipa- tory guidance issues, which may or may not coincide with parental priorities. Many teachable moments occur in response to a parent’s questions but can also be found in the child’s office behavior or in responses to written materials such as prompt sheets. Teach- able moments provide a clinically effective and effi- cient approach to anticipatory guidance so that par- ents can prevent problems.
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Profile, knowledge, and work patterns of a cadre of maternal, newborn, and child health CHWs focusing on preventive and promotive services in Morogoro Region, Tanzania

Profile, knowledge, and work patterns of a cadre of maternal, newborn, and child health CHWs focusing on preventive and promotive services in Morogoro Region, Tanzania

survey drawing from the MoHSW MNCH national guidelines on the content of training provided was administered to 228 (of the 238) MNCH CHWs fol- lowing their recruitment, training, and deployment (Table 3). MNCH CHWs trained at least 3 months (from December 2012 to July 2013) prior to the start of the survey in October 2013 were eligible for inclu- sion. If participants were unavailable during researchers’ first visit to a village, a return visit for the interview was arranged at a later date during the period of data collec- tion. Participants were not included if they did not con- sent to the interview, dropped out of the program, were traveling with an unknown return date, sick/hospitalized, or deceased at the time of data collection. The survey administered to consenting individuals included sec- tions on CHW socio-demographics, service delivery, supervision, incentives, satisfaction, motivation, and MNCH knowledge. The latter included 38 questions with 191 possible responses (unprompted) across the following domains: pregnancy (3 questions), postpartum (3 questions), newborn care (3 questions), child health (7 questions), nutrition (4 questions), HIV transmission (3 questions), malaria (1 question), infection prevention (3 questions), injury prevention 1 (question), and family planning (10 questions), all of which aligned with the CHW curriculum. The average number of correct re- sponses was used to generate a composite score for each domain and an overall average derived from across the averages calculated for each of the 10 do- mains (mean of means).
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