Top PDF Evaluation of Enfield Family and Adolescent Support Service (FASH)

Evaluation of Enfield Family and Adolescent Support Service (FASH)

Evaluation of Enfield Family and Adolescent Support Service (FASH)

Support Provided by FASH On leaving the residential unit, Hakan was provided with £900 from the FASH. However, this was spent quickly and it was questionable as to whether this was necessary and what impact this would have in terms of Hakan’s expectations of the service. The key focus of the social worker was to help Hakan find employment, and maintain a positive relationship with his mother and other family members. The social worker met with Hakan and his mother on a weekly basis, and spoke to them at least every 72 hours. The social worker also provided some learning support around English and Maths. FASH were provided with an employment opportunity for Hakan through their partnership work with YOS and an interview was arranged with North London Garages for Hakan to begin an apprenticeship, but unfortunately, he was not successful. Hakan had some challenging behaviours and special needs, and although the social worker was trying to get him to participate in some volunteering work, he was only interested in paid work. There were numerous entries on children’s services case files describing phone calls from Hakan’s mother regarding her concern with her husband potentially inflicting violence on her and her sons. However, there was no proof of this and the case was referred to a voluntary organisation for domestic violence for a response. The social worker referred Hakan’s mother to a psychologist within FASH for support in relation to her concerns.
Show more

91 Read more

Evaluation of the Integrated Family Support Service. First interim report

Evaluation of the Integrated Family Support Service. First interim report

6.29 In general IFSS staff report that their experiences of Phase 2 so far have generally been positive. The IFSS spearhead workers schedule regular meetings with the family, the case holding children’s social worker, adult social workers and other relevant services to review progress. However, it has been noted that the high turnover of staff in mainstream social work teams has resulted in inconsistent engagement with families especially over the extended period of IFSS Phase 2 delivery. When new staff take over a case they are unfamiliar with the progress a family has made which can mean the strengths based approach is undermined. This highlights the importance of new social workers in the wider services having an understanding of IFSS, perhaps built in as part of their induction programme. Moreover, where a case working social worker leaves, a handover process needs to ensure continuity of the IFSS plan.
Show more

56 Read more

Evaluation of the integrated family support service : first interim report

Evaluation of the integrated family support service : first interim report

6.29 In general IFSS staff report that their experiences of Phase 2 so far have generally been positive. The IFSS spearhead workers schedule regular meetings with the family, the case holding children’s social worker, adult social workers and other relevant services to review progress. However, it has been noted that the high turnover of staff in mainstream social work teams has resulted in inconsistent engagement with families especially over the extended period of IFSS Phase 2 delivery. When new staff take over a case they are unfamiliar with the progress a family has made which can mean the strengths based approach is undermined. This highlights the importance of new social workers in the wider services having an understanding of IFSS, perhaps built in as part of their induction programme. Moreover, where a case working social worker leaves, a handover process needs to ensure continuity of the IFSS plan.
Show more

56 Read more

Evaluation of the Integrated Family Support Service : year 3 report, February 2014

Evaluation of the Integrated Family Support Service : year 3 report, February 2014

Early evaluation evidence indicates that these schemes are working 2.20 The evaluation evidence on these interventions is generally rather patchy. However, the main conclusions to date have been broadly positive in terms of the impact of these services on improving family outcomes and in some cases, reducing costs to the public purse. Specifically, it has been reported that the Option 2 model has significantly reduced the need for children to enter into care, is likely to generate substantial cost savings for local authorities and other social care, health and criminal justice agencies, and overall, helps to improve family well-being and parental welfare. In relation to RSW, it is claimed that the model has been very successful in contributing towards a reduction in the number of looked after children and reducing the overall cost of children’s social care in Hackney. An evaluation report 8 by the National Centre for Social Research shows that intensive intervention to support and challenge troubled families can be effective in turning round their lives. It was claimed that a family receiving intensive support and challenge is twice as likely to stop anti-social behaviour as one not getting the intervention.
Show more

99 Read more

Evaluation of the Integrated Family Support Service : year 3 report, February 2014

Evaluation of the Integrated Family Support Service : year 3 report, February 2014

Issue 1 for consideration: as highlighted in the interim evaluation reports, the evidence suggests that IFSS appears to be an effective policy intervention for supporting families to move away from a potential ‘crisis’ or ‘tipping point’. However, the programme may not really tackle the existing stock of families who have gone through a crisis in the past or whose lives are extremely chaotic and they are not motivated to turn things round. A different intervention, perhaps over a longer period and focussed on building motivation to change, may be required in order to engage families from this cohort and to make them receptive to IFSS-style support.
Show more

10 Read more

Family support programs and adolescent mental health: review of evidence

Family support programs and adolescent mental health: review of evidence

Team-led Team-led programs were a relatively rare model of service delivery. Team-led family support programs included in this review are described in Table 3. Beneficial caregiver outcomes included increases in caregiver knowledge about mental health services and increased self-efficacy regarding the ability to acquire mental health treatment for the child. 43 However, several studies reported no effect or non-superior effects of the team-led family support treatments relative to comparison treatments for parental outcomes such as care- giver involvement in the child’s mental health services, parent problem-solving skills, coping skills, or perceived social sup- port. In terms of child outcomes, one study showed reductions in child disruptive behavior, while another study showed non- superior effects of the team-led family support intervention relative to comparison treatment on child behavior. In sum, although team-led treatment studies showed some positive effects on caregiver outcomes, child outcomes were more mixed, and there was minimal evidence demonstrating the superiority of team-led family support programs over com- parison treatments.
Show more

16 Read more

Evaluation of the Sefton Community Adolescent Service (CAS)

Evaluation of the Sefton Community Adolescent Service (CAS)

The piloting showed that there were often opportunities for CAS workers to engage with younger family members as part of the intervention, and that this work had a strong preventative focus where younger children were exposed to many of the same risk factors as their older siblings who were the subject of the referral. Similarly, feedback from CAS practitioners indicated that many of the presenting issues for the service (missing, CSE, guns and gangs) were starting at age 9 or 10, and that the 12-25 age range was pitched too high to achieve the maximum impact from the CAS. Taking these points into account, Sefton Council might wish to consider the merits of extending the age range for the service, and including work with young people at the cusp of transition from primary to secondary school. This might also require some consideration of the composition of the CAS team, and/or, the external expertise that is accessed by the service, to include the younger age groups.
Show more

64 Read more

Evaluation of Intensive Family Support Projects in Scotland

Evaluation of Intensive Family Support Projects in Scotland

4.37 Although, over time, the Projects were relatively successful in differentiating themselves from other statutory agencies and building trusting relations with family members, it could take several months for significant progress to be achieved here. Once families had begun to engage, there could be a second protracted period of interaction in order to get family members to acknowledge and recognise their problems and their need for help. In addition, there was also an initial need to work around some underlying problems (such as alcohol dependency) rather than being able to tackle these issues directly from the outset. While such an approach was clearly the only feasible way of facilitating families’ longer-term engagement with the Projects, the duration of these stages of intervention sometimes resulted in the planned period of service provision being considerably extended. This also suggests that, while earlier intervention with some families may be desirable, it is also vital to ensure that referrals are made at a time when families are willing and able to consider making changes to their circumstances.
Show more

216 Read more

Family therapy within an adolescent addiction treatment service. “In search of solutions".

Family therapy within an adolescent addiction treatment service. “In search of solutions".

PRACTICE ISSUES Engagement with clients Currently, young people attending the service are less concerned about their engagement in substance misuse following the decline of heroin use particularly in Dublin where the problem peaked in the late 1990s. Substances such as alcohol, cannabis/weed, ecstasy and cocaine tend to be viewed more as recreational by young people. In recent years referrals to the service have come from parents or non-parental adults such as professionals rather than from young people themselves. In contrast to an adult substance using population, young people are at an early stage in the substance misuse and may not have experienced any negative consequences to cause them to be concerned. The situation is compounded in conditions where substance misuse features within a family and wider community context. In the circumstances motivation for change is not very high and parents often report feeling overwhelmed, disempowered and frustrated at their inability to cope especially in situations where a young person is out of school and may be indebted. The position is further complicated if parental relationship is strained or if parents are separated. Additionally, children’s rights are complicated by the fact that the appropriate distance among family members and the nature of boundaries between parents and children change as a young person matures (O’Neill, 1991). Ethical considerations come into play as one attempts to balance legitimate values of the rights of children to appropriate autonomy within the family system while taking into consideration the variables that thwart the evaluation of information if different members of the family/system have different perspectives or priorities involving a web of overlapping rights and responsibilities. In such situations one encounters ethical issues to which there are no simple or unquestionably right solutions (Family Therapy Association of Ireland, 2005). In the circumstances it has been my experience that families may have to spend more time resolving internal conflicts or in some situations it is appropriate to suspend consultations in order to encourage parents, young people and professionals to engage in relational processes allowing for the possibility of re-contracting with services. In taking time out no member of the family/system is alienated.
Show more

16 Read more

Adolescent and Parent Experience of Care at a Family-Based Treatment Service for Eating Disorders

Adolescent and Parent Experience of Care at a Family-Based Treatment Service for Eating Disorders

When FBT comes to an end and discharge and/or transfer to other services is needed, this can be a challenging time, regardless of families ’ experience to date. Although most parents and adolescent were satis fied with their discharge experience, several expressed that they did not feel well prepared for the end of treatment or did not receive appropriate referrals to other services or information about adult services. Importantly, less than half of adolescents reported that they knew what to do if they relapsed. A transition service was in operation during this study which aimed to support adolescents being transferred to the adult hospital; however, this was not available to all families (e.g., younger adolescents, those not in the geographical catchment). Other discharge support efforts have since been implemented including three “booster sessions” which are provided during the 6 months following FBT to monitor symptoms, reduce risk of relapse, and provide a less abrupt cessation of treatment with the FBT clinician. While these efforts may go some way to improving the experience of discharge, more research into how services can support families during this time is needed. This may ultimately require greater investment in resources to allow specialist services to provide longer or more individualized approaches.
Show more

11 Read more

SYDNEY FAMILY LAW SETTLEMENT SERVICE 2012 SERVICE EVALUATION REPORT

SYDNEY FAMILY LAW SETTLEMENT SERVICE 2012 SERVICE EVALUATION REPORT

The Post mediation survey for the clients sought to gauge their satisfaction with the process and the outcome and to elicit some qualitative data about what ‘satisfaction’ meant from each client’s perspective. It was considered that a general indicator of ‘satisfaction’ with the process would be if the clients would recommend it to others. After their experience in the mediation, more than three quarters of the respondents said they would recommend the process to others. This is a significant indicator that the parties found the process of mediation well suited to their needs, especially when this support is put in the context that ten of the thirty four respondents (29.41%) returning the ‘Authority to disclose process outcome’ indicated that ‘No agreement had been reached (and proceedings will continue)’. Therefore, it is very interesting to find that even if the parties did not settle there was still a strong preference for recommending mediation to others.
Show more

52 Read more

Patient, family, carer and support person evaluation survey template

Patient, family, carer and support person evaluation survey template

22. I had opportunity to ask questions about the harmful incident 1 2 3 4 5 NA 23. Clear information was given about the consequences of the harmful incident 1 2 3 4 5 NA 24. After the open disclosure, it was clear to me how the health service organisation was going to investigate the harmful incident

7 Read more

Student Family Support Services Initiative: Final Evaluation Report

Student Family Support Services Initiative: Final Evaluation Report

Lessons Learned and Recommendations SFSI Spurred Innovation and Partnerships Across Funding Sources and Agencies SFSI demonstrated an effective way to use different funding streams to put together a full package of services for very disadvantaged families. Historically and often to the detriment of participants, services have often been delivered in a “siloed” fashion due to the way funding has been allocated. This initiative showed that with coordination and intentional bundling, a robust service package can be offered, at least through DFSS. A future initiative to create a program like SFSI could explore a financial partnership between city agencies(DFSS and CPS) to create a system of response embedded across agencies. Further intentional coordination across these agencies in the future could support meaningful service delivery to doubled-up families.
Show more

52 Read more

Evaluation of the Seattle Public School s Family Support Program

Evaluation of the Seattle Public School s Family Support Program

Seattle Fire Department Training Facility Community Service Partnerships Boeing Employees CU Washington State 4- H Junior Achievement Therapeutic Health Services/Central Youth and Family Services

43 Read more

BARNET, ENFIELD & HARINGEY MENTAL HEALTH NHS TRUST JOB DESCRIPTION. CONSULTANT IN CHILD and ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY

BARNET, ENFIELD & HARINGEY MENTAL HEALTH NHS TRUST JOB DESCRIPTION. CONSULTANT IN CHILD and ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY

The Trust will support continuing professional development in terms of study leave and reasonable reimbursement of course fees. The Trust follows a study leave policy supporting doctors in accessing study leave time according to national guidance. Funding for study leave agreed in job planning is subject to approval through the Service Line Manager and Clinical Director.

15 Read more

The Canterbury Support Line: A Review of the Literature and Evaluation of the Service

The Canterbury Support Line: A Review of the Literature and Evaluation of the Service

Many calls were from distressed people attempting to ascertain the status of missing friends or family. Call operators would provide counselling via the telephone, obtain information about the missing person, and take the contact details of the caller. Information about the missing person was matched against hospital admission lists and call operators would make return calls to inform callers of the status of the missing person, to ascertain whether a person had since returned home/made contact, or to gather more information (e.g., what the person was wearing on the day of the attacks). Daily updated resource lists were made available and information regarding frequently asked questions was posted around the call centre enabling call operators to respond to a broad range of practical issues such as air toxicity levels and the ability of people to return to their homes. Call operators would also help frightened and grieving callers cope with their distress. Rather than promote callers to be more hopeful or more realistic, operators would attempt to “meet the client where the client was,” provide support, and encourage them to access their own social support networks.
Show more

49 Read more

Adolescent depressive disorders and family based interventions in the family options multicenter evaluation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Adolescent depressive disorders and family based interventions in the family options multicenter evaluation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Acknowledgements We are thankful to current and past students, facilitators of the interventions and research assistants for their contribution to the trial: Ai Tran, Julian Thompson, Alicia Tompson, Rebecca Fitzpatrick, Brittany Watkins, Laura Nichols, Josh Hayward, John Reynolds, Daniel Condon, Antanita Chrysostom, Nicola Copley, Karen Richens, Marika Cock, Johanna Wilkinson, Milanda Matthews, Reima Pryor, and Helen Rimington. We would also like to thank those organizations and people who have provided significant in-kind support: Eastern Health and Turning Point Alcohol & Drug Center, Jonathan Tyler, Shannon Lang, Tracey Driscoll, Dale Howard, Melissa Lethbridge, Angela Wright, Leah Hann, Jane Vane-Tempest, and the entire Eastern Health CYMHS Access Service. Thanks also to Dr Lucy Bajisa, Senior Research Fellow, Biostatistics Unit, Faculty of Health, Deakin University.
Show more

11 Read more

FAMILY CARER SUPPORT SERVICE

FAMILY CARER SUPPORT SERVICE

If you do not receive enough ‘Council Tax Support’ to pay your council tax in full, and you cannot find the extra money to pay, you might be eligible for a ‘Discretionary Housing Payment’ (DHA). You can apply for this through your local council. Every council has their own eligibility rules for these payments so you will need to contact them directly for more information. The charity Shelter has a good factsheet about DHAs here:

25 Read more

Symptoms in adolescent sexually victimized: The role of family support and peer support

Symptoms in adolescent sexually victimized: The role of family support and peer support

Revista sobre la infancia y la adolescencia, 11, 66-80 - Octubre 2016 ISSN 2174- 7210 67 symptoms and to assess their perception of social support. The results of multiple regression analysis show that the perception of support from family is inversely associated with all three types of symptoms. However, the perception of peer support is only inversely associated with depressive symptoms. These results show that the family remains the main protective agent, even in adolescence. The peer group possess fewer protection resources, for this reason its role would be more focused on distraction. Keywords: sexual abuse, social support, family, peer group, symptoms.
Show more

15 Read more

Royal Enfield Classic 500 - Service Manual

Royal Enfield Classic 500 - Service Manual

03-12 The maintenance schedule detailed here will help you maintain your Classic Motorcycles meticulously and to get a long trouble free service. The schedule provided herein is based upon average riding conditions and indicates the Kms at which regular inspections, adjustments, replacements and lubrications are to be carried out. The frequency of the maintenance must be shortened depending upon the severity of the driving condition or if the motorcycle is used in a very dusty environment, severe cold, extreme heat, bad roads, standing water etc., Contact the nearest Royal Enfield Dealer for expert advice and to carry out the required maintenance.
Show more

229 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...