Top PDF Evaluation of the National Networks for Collaborative Outreach (NNCOs)

Evaluation of the National Networks for Collaborative Outreach (NNCOs)

Evaluation of the National Networks for Collaborative Outreach (NNCOs)

This aspect of the evaluation set out to explore what features of the networks were likely to be sustained beyond 2015-16 and what may be needed to secure this activity. In general the NNCO programme can be seen to have successfully stimulated a high degree of activity and working practices (including relationships) that are envisaged as being sustainable, albeit often in the context of NCOP funding and the fact that half of the 34 regional networks were pre-existing and therefore not dependent on HEFCE funding for their existence. Moreover in advance of the NCOP programme being announced most networks were not sure what sort of legacy there may be and it would be helpful to ensure that sustainability plans are more readily and systematically developed, post-NCOP. One of the intentions of the overall NNCO scheme, however, was that the networks would draw in other funding sources, e.g. from LEPs or the European Social Fund. Across all surveys, however, there was a dearth of evidence that this had happened (either that initiatives had been implemented or that they had been successful). In September 2015 HEFCE funded New College Durham (see 10.2) to develop a project to stimulate involvement from the still nascent LEPs. The outcome of this project may offer a model of how other collaborative outreach projects may develop similar successes.
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Evaluation of the National Networks for Collaborative Outreach (NNCOs)

Evaluation of the National Networks for Collaborative Outreach (NNCOs)

This aspect of the evaluation set out to explore what features of the networks were likely to be sustained beyond 2015-16 and what may be needed to secure this activity. In general the NNCO programme can be seen to have successfully stimulated a high degree of activity and working practices (including relationships) that are envisaged as being sustainable, albeit often in the context of NCOP funding and the fact that half of the 34 regional networks were pre-existing and therefore not dependent on HEFCE funding for their existence. Moreover in advance of the NCOP programme being announced most networks were not sure what sort of legacy there may be and it would be helpful to ensure that sustainability plans are more readily and systematically developed, post-NCOP. One of the intentions of the overall NNCO scheme, however, was that the networks would draw in other funding sources, e.g. from LEPs or the European Social Fund. Across all surveys, however, there was a dearth of evidence that this had happened (either that initiatives had been implemented or that they had been successful). In September 2015 HEFCE funded New College Durham (see 10.2) to develop a project to stimulate involvement from the still nascent LEPs. The outcome of this project may offer a model of how other collaborative outreach projects may develop similar successes.
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Evaluation of the Cumbria and Lancashire Network for Collaborative Outreach (CLNCO)

Evaluation of the Cumbria and Lancashire Network for Collaborative Outreach (CLNCO)

collaboration which, in turn, served to complement the activity evaluation undertaken by individual projects as part of the CLNCO programme. Section 2 offers the school perspective drawing upon an online survey completed by 108 teachers together with feedback from teachers involved in a range of project activities. The external evaluation team was asked to explore seven exemplar projects which are discussed in section 3, where the features and key lessons of each project are described. Analysis of the evidence collected within this evaluation suggested a series of cross cutting themes (aims, context, exchange, resources and sustainability) which are discussed in section 4. Section 5 then brings together lessons for and from key stakeholders within CLNCO, notably: policy makers, higher education providers, schools, and external stakeholders with whom CLNCO have collaborated. The final section of the report offers ideas for consideration by the forthcoming Cumbria and Lancashire National Collaborative Outreach Projects.
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National Collaborative Outreach Programme : year one report of the national formative and impact evaluation, including capacity building with NCOP consortia

National Collaborative Outreach Programme : year one report of the national formative and impact evaluation, including capacity building with NCOP consortia

Fewer consortia have confirmed plans to conduct quasi-experimental activity with matched comparator groups as part of their local-evaluation offer. Many consortia have spent the first 12 months recruiting staff and developing their programme of delivery. Therefore, we expect that consortia will be undertaking experimental work as part of their evaluation activity in year 2, including research into effective interventions for specific target groups, such as working class boys. Some consortia are planning to determine the extent to which non- NCOP learner data collected through the participant baseline survey will comprise a suitable comparison group for local evaluation activity once it has been linked to the relevant tracking data later in 2018. Consortia will be required to share outputs and evidence from their local evaluation activity at quarterly intervals during 2018.
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Report: National Collaborative Outreach Programme Year one report of the national formative and impact evaluation, including capacity building with NCOP consortia

Report: National Collaborative Outreach Programme Year one report of the national formative and impact evaluation, including capacity building with NCOP consortia

Having a range of educational providers, both at FE and HE levels, helps to ensure that learners can engage with and experience a range of different routes into and through HE. Partnerships have also been built with employers, such as construction companies, local institutions such as football clubs and third sector providers of IAG and enrichment activity, such as Brightside, Curious Minds and URPotential. Engaging with a diverse range of organisations means consortia have access to specialist expertise, knowledge and skills and can provide bespoke packages to engage target learners that take the local context into account. Third sector organisations can sometimes offer new insights into involving harder to reach groups, including parents. This in turn provides opportunities for consortia to up- skill their outreach staff.
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The National Collaborative Outreach Programme  End of phase 1 report for the national formative and impact evaluations

The National Collaborative Outreach Programme End of phase 1 report for the national formative and impact evaluations

The evaluation that conducted a second follow-up survey with summer school participants provides mixed results on the sustainability of the outcomes achieved. Immediate survey findings suggest summer schools greatly improve participants’ knowledge on how to apply to university. While respondents to the second follow-up survey also reported improved knowledge of the application process, the proportion is lower compared with the responses provided immediately after the residential. Immediately following the summer school, learners reported that they knew more about how to find information on post-18 options. At the second follow-up, this knowledge had been maintained. By the second follow-up, participants reported a high level of understanding of their future career options and the choices available to them. However, as lower levels of understanding were reported immediately after the summer school, this suggests that learners had benefited from further interventions and/or had undertaken their own research in order to improve their knowledge. Two of the evaluations suggest that summer schools could have a negative impact on male learners from disadvantaged backgrounds. One evaluation noted that summer schools had a negative impact on boys’ intentions to progress to HE and another noted similar findings, with a 6% decrease in their intentions to apply to HE. The analysis of the learner survey (see Chapter 5) suggests that, with the exception of male perceptions of their ability to succeed in HE, NCOP is less likely to be having a positive impact on male learners overall compared with female learners. Further research into the barriers experienced by male learners and taking account of the ‘male learner voice’ in the development of partnerships’ strategic and operational
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Developing and Engaging in Collaborative Networks to Support Student Employability and Work Placements – Examples from a Local, National and International Perspective

Developing and Engaging in Collaborative Networks to Support Student Employability and Work Placements – Examples from a Local, National and International Perspective

Our experience managing innovation projects suggests that building support for a community of practitioners is very important. Every year about 10 projects receive funding to carry out innovative teaching and learning activities. Our first aim is to ensure that the projects know about each other and the central support that we can provide, such as support with evaluation design. To ensure this, we organise three development sessions a year to which all project members are invited. The sessions are a way of developing a sense of community and to provide project with an infrastructure. Typically, the first session will be about getting to know what the projects do and each project will pitch a short presentation about the aims and objectives of the project. The other projects can then get a better idea of the proposed
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Implementation of collaborative governance in cross sector innovation and education networks: evidence from the National Health Service in England

Implementation of collaborative governance in cross sector innovation and education networks: evidence from the National Health Service in England

Third, our data indicate that progress on governance activities was slowed by the vagueness of the HIEC mandate as well as by the intrinsically challenging nature of cross-sector collaborative working. In some cases, we found evidence of early-stage delays in implementation due to a prolonged deliberation of the HIEC vision and mission. Also, achieving full progress on governance ac- tivities was intrinsically challenging due to the very dif- ferent expectations, engagement, and commitment of the board members who came from different sectors. In line with the findings from the United States that ac- countability in cross-sector health partnerships can be difficult to define and enforce [4,5], accountability in HIECs proved to be one of the more problematic areas of governance activities. Some respondents believed that the HIEC mandate should have included metrics or indi- cators to measure HIECs’ performance against a set of locally-agreed objectives in a number of priority areas. This would have facilitated a formal evaluation of the HIECs nationally. We propose that for cross-sector health partnerships with a vague mandate and the provision of new resources, policy-makers develop performance met- rics in agreement with each locally-constituted partner- ship and conduct formal evaluations of their activity at the end of their mandate or funding cycle.
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Distributed and Collaborative Processing in Wireless Sensor Networks

Distributed and Collaborative Processing in Wireless Sensor Networks

The traditional approach of studying the distributed detection problem is to as- sume that sensors transmit their observations (possibly quantized versions of them) through a set of independent parallel access channels (PAC) [20, 21, 105], as shown in Fig. 3.1.(a). For large-scale sensor networks, this assumption implies a large bandwidth requirement for simultaneous transmissions or a large detection delay. Alternatively, we can employ a mul- tiple access channel (MAC), as shown in Fig. 3.1.(b). The bandwidth requirement of MAC fusion does not depend on the number of sensors, but due to the additive nature of the chan- nel, the received signal at the fusion center is generally not sufficient for reliable detection. However, it is known that when the sensor observations are conditionally independent, soft decision fusion where each sensor transmits its local log-likelihood-ratio (LLR) value over the MAC is asymptotically optimal [76]. Recently, Type-Based Multiple Access (TBMA) has been proposed by Mergen and Tong [81, 82, 83, 84] as well as by Liu and Sayeed [75, 76], where each sensor transmits the waveform corresponding to its quantized observation over a MAC. For i.i.d. sensor observations and identical channel gains, the fusion center receives a noisy version of the type of sensor observations, which is a sufficient statistic for detection, and TBMA achieves the same error exponent as the centralized detection [76, 83]. The per- formance of TBMA degrades for fading channels, especially when the channel gain has zero mean [81]. Anandkumar and Tong subsequently proposed the Type-Based Random Access (TBRA) to improve the performance of TBMA over the noncoherent channel by control- ling the rate of random access [7]. These works mostly assumed conditionally-independent sensor observations, and not much has been explored along the line for correlated observa- tions, which would arise when detecting a random spatially-correlated signal in noise, or a deterministic signal in noise where the noise samples are correlated due to the proximity of sensors.
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National Intelligence University Research-Outreach-Education Quick Statistical Facts AY

National Intelligence University Research-Outreach-Education Quick Statistical Facts AY

NIU History: The Office of the Secretary of Defense issued a memorandum establishing the Defense Intelligence School on February 27th 1962. It has undergone several name changes since then, finally becoming the National Intelligence University in 2011. For five decades, the institution has strived to educate and prepare intelligence officers to meet current and future challenges to the national security of the United States.

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Powerbase : A collaborative resource for monitoring power networks

Powerbase : A collaborative resource for monitoring power networks

The neoconservatives have been active in the American political arena for nearly four decades, but it was only in the lead up to and aftermath of the Iraq war that sufficient attention has been paid them. Much of this information still remains imprecise, and barely scratches the surfaces of the vast network of institutions the movement has spawned to serve as a shadow national security establishment. Given the prominent role it played in the Iraq war and the potential of its various front organizations drawing Britain and the United States into war against Iran, Powerbase has dedicated a portal solely to monitoring the activities of this network. The portal traces the origins, evolution, and composition of the movement. It investigates its ideological orientation, sources of power, and strategic alliances. It keeps track of the neoconservatives’ proliferating network of think tanks, letterhead organizations (LHO), front groups and media affiliates. It keeps an up-to-date record of neoconservative initiatives aimed at pushing aggressive policy abroad and curb on civil liberties at home in the guise of fighting terrorism. Powerbase has revealed the neoconservative provenance of such organizations as Policy Forum and Réalité-EU, and exposed the systematic use of Web 2.0 and social media technologies like Twitter for disinformation purposes during Israel’s 2008-2009 assault on Gaza and the protests following Iran’s disputed 2009 elections.
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The National Children’s Study: Early Recruitment Outcomes Using the Direct Outreach Approach

The National Children’s Study: Early Recruitment Outcomes Using the Direct Outreach Approach

Community outreach and targeted household mailings were key strategies for women to learn about the NCS. However, only 60% of eligible and enrolled women heard of the NCS before completing the PS and approximately half of these women learned via letters. Creating study awareness among potential participants was particularly challenging in densely populated counties as selected neighborhoods represented, on average, only 3% of the counties’ total DUs. Individualized rather than generic mailings are recommended for enhancing response rates, an approach consistent with the social exchange theory, which posits that personalized approaches to recruitment increase perceived rewards for responding and promote trust in beneficial study outcomes. 13
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Educational outreach and collaborative care enhances physician's perceived knowledge about Developmental Coordination Disorder

Educational outreach and collaborative care enhances physician's perceived knowledge about Developmental Coordination Disorder

Tailoring services to the physician's needs, the OT assessed the child either with or without the physician present, provided feedback in written form and discussed the results with the physician. The OT and the physician then jointly presented the findings to the parents. A wide vari- ety of educational materials was made available to parents at this time including handouts that could be shared with teachers, coaches, community leaders and other physi- cians. (See Additional file 1 for details of these family edu- cational materials). Materials were available in English and French and were selected by the OT and physician based upon the child's identified needs. OT collaborative care services including conducting a clinical assessment with child and family, consultation with the physician and provision of feedback to the family, took between 3 and 4 hours per child in total. A physician's involvement in collaborative care including screening of the child's motor abilities, discussion with the family, consultation with the OT and provision of feedback took between 1 and 3 hours per child. The process of educational out- reach and collaborative care is illustrated in Figure 1.
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ENTREPRENEURIAL ORIENTATION, COLLABORATIVE NETWORKS, AND NONPROFIT PERFORMANCE

ENTREPRENEURIAL ORIENTATION, COLLABORATIVE NETWORKS, AND NONPROFIT PERFORMANCE

organization or social actor (Ofem, Floyd, Borgatti, 2012). In this strategy the researcher can sample from a given population and then identify the characteristics of the direct ties of those actors. The sample chosen as study subjects or respondents are called “egos” and the nodes they have ties with are called “alters.” The set of nodes and ties associated with an ego is referred to as the ego network, which in this study I label collaborative network. In this study, I focus on the organization as the ego, collaborative relationships as the ties, and other organizations as the alters. A key advantage of the ego network approach is that it makes it feasible to collect richer data on the full set of relations that may exist between two nodes, which is useful in exploring the collaborative practices of a given set of organizations. Although the ego network approach does not allow for the calculation of many of the structural properties provided by the full network approach, it does offer some valuable and predictive measures of organizational outcomes. It also allows the researcher to identify organizations that might not be an EDO (or whatever other type of social actor is under investigation) but are still an important collaborative partner to a focal EDO (or whichever social actor).
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A New Zealand National Outreach Program – Inspiring Young Girls in Humanitarian Engineering

A New Zealand National Outreach Program – Inspiring Young Girls in Humanitarian Engineering

To ensure we sparked interest from this target group of young girls, we took an unusual approach about how we marketed our program. Typically large/national outreach programs targeted at girls tend to have a similar marketing approach. Usually the name of the program has some connotation with science or technology and it is very clear from the outset that the program supports STEM. For example, “Techbridge” 17 began as a program of the Chabot Space & Science Centre in California, which “inspires girls to discover a passion for technology, science and engineering. Through hands-on learning, we empower the next generation of innovators and leaders”. We specifically marketed our program so that on first impression girls would not associate it with engineering or technology. We call this “engineering education by stealth”. For example, we have purposely chosen the name “Hello Café” 18
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A collaborative framework for intrusion detection in mobile networks

A collaborative framework for intrusion detection in mobile networks

Mobile ad-hoc networks represent an important source of information about intrusion detection systems for wireless environments. For example, Thamilarasu et al. [28] propose a Cross-layer Intrusion Detection System (IDS) in order to mitigate DoS attacks in ad-hoc networks with a focus on collisions, misdirection and packet drops. The cross-layer design is able to de- tect intrusion at different protocol layers and to exploit the information from one layer to another layer. Zhang et al. [36] propose a distributed and coop- erative IDS architecture where each node participates with its information resources. Other authors [22] address the issues related to a rigid response to an intrusion by proposing a flexible scheme that depends on the measured severity of attack and the degradation in network performance. We remark that all these interesting proposals focus on ad-hoc networks that are quite different from mobile Internet-based networks of interest for this paper. For a similar reason, we distinguish from approaches using host IDS [11], and from statistical profiling algorithms (e.g., [34]) that are ineffective against mobile evasion.
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Evaluation of outreach clinics held by specialists in general practice in England

Evaluation of outreach clinics held by specialists in general practice in England

conclusion overall—that if the increasing de- mand for outreach clinics is met, the workload of the specialist in hospital could be adversely a V ected. In conclusion, while the process of care was of higher quality in outreach than in outpatients, and e Y ciency was also greater in the outreach setting, this was at a substantially higher cost, and the e V ect on patient health outcomes was small. The policy implication, which is also of international relevance, is that, in the short-term, the costs of health care are more likely to be contained by retaining the current hospital outpatient system alone, rather than supplementing this with specialist out- reach services to individual practices where fewer patients can be seen, investigative technology is often unavailable, and with consequences for costs. However, the real costs of outreach in comparison with outpatients clinics can probably only be truly estimated in a longitudinal study with a resource based costing model derived from documented pa- tient attendances and treatment costs over time in relation to longer term outcome (for example, at a two year end point). In addition, the greater e Y ciency of outreach in compari- son with outpatient clinics also needs to be measured over time. The question remains: Is the one third reduction in direct referrals to outpatient departments from outreach prac- tices, the lower non-attendance rates in out- reach, the increase in appropriate outpatient referrals from outreach practices (reported by over a fifth of the specialists), together with the higher patient discharge rate in outreach, maintained, or even accelerated, over time? If outreach results in an increasing number of more appropriate referrals to specialists over time then their increased costs may be judged to be worthwhile.
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Day 2: Workshop Collaborative Business Networks

Day 2: Workshop Collaborative Business Networks

additional players, such as research institutes to deliver complex products. This workshop provides an overview over and a discussion of public policies addressing networks as part of regional innovation strategies, how co-operation in networks and clusters can foster innovation and how networks can be

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Evaluation of alternate outreach models for cataract services in rural Nepal

Evaluation of alternate outreach models for cataract services in rural Nepal

The Hospital planned fewer, more strategic DST camps to increase the efficiency of its outreach program. The hospital reduced the number of DSTs in or near Bharat- pur partly because it was concerned with equity. They wanted people from higher socio-economic classes, living near to the hospital, to pay for surgery, if they could. The hospital also sought to increase the number of 'direct' paying people to improve its financial sustainability. Peo- ple who come directly to the hospital usually pay the cost of cataract surgery, unlike people referred from DST camps, where cataract surgical costs are free. At no time did the Hospital actively encourage direct paying patients through public advertisements or seek referrals from the primary health care system.
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Collaborative Intrusion Detection Networks and Insider Attacks

Collaborative Intrusion Detection Networks and Insider Attacks

DShield [6] is a community-based firewall log correlation system. The central server receives firewall logs from world-wide volunteers and then analyzes attack trends based on the information collected. Similar systems includes myNetWatchMan [19] and CAIDA [20]. DShield is used as the data collection engine behind the SANS Internet Storm Center (ISC) [21]. Analysis provided by DShield has been used in the early detection of several worms, such as “Code Red” and “SQL Snake”. Due to the number of participants and volume of data collected, DShield is a very attractive resource and its data is used by researchers to analyze attack patterns. However, DShield is a centralized system and it does not provide real-time analysis or rule generation. Also due to the privacy issues, payload information and some headers can not be shared, which makes the classification of attacks often not possible. However, DShield does not require restrict authentication to participate and also does not have trust evaluation for all participants. Therefore, it is also vulnerable to all insider attacks listed.
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