Top PDF Evaluation of the Workforce Development Programme (WDP)

Evaluation of the Workforce Development Programme (WDP)

Evaluation of the Workforce Development Programme (WDP)

The company has seen some positive outcomes emerge from the training, including improved time management and team leadership skills. Training on Employment Law had also enabled them to keep up to date with legislation. There has been an improvement in their Performance Management processes, with managers now able to deal with difficult situations much better. All ILM Level 5 participants (all Senior Managers) agreed that the training had helped them to better understand their own management styles and team leadership skills. This training has also been useful as part of their internal succession planning programme and helped the company identify future leaders. It is likely that a high proportion of the training undertaken by company J would have taken place even in the absence of support via the WDP.
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Evaluation of the Workforce Development Programme (WDP)

Evaluation of the Workforce Development Programme (WDP)

4.5 Should the Welsh Government decide to commission a workforce development advisory service (to take forward some of the functions of the previous WDA network) in the future, it should consider how this service can be targeted for maximum effect and best value. In particular, the Welsh Government should consider (in light of key learning points from the WDP) targeting in-depth diagnostic and advisory aspects of such a service at small businesses while allowing micro enterprises and larger companies (especially ones with in house HR capability) to apply direct for any co-investment based financial support instruments.
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Evaluation of the higher education transforming workforce development programme

Evaluation of the higher education transforming workforce development programme

3.29 Further feedback supports the conclusion that trends have emerged in the types of operational models adopted during the course of the Programme. Interviews with case study projects reveal that at the one extreme there are “very decentralised model[s]” in which “schools do their own thing” (WFDP 14). Equally there are centralised models, or new ways of working in which a centralised workforce development unit “takes the money from the client, it charges the price, it invoices the client, it owns the client. It‟s responsible for the delivery” (WFDP 16). In WFDP 16, the unit with responsibility for workforce development commissions and pays the faculty for the delivery, so the operational model established is based upon a commercial transaction. At the extreme, the centralised unit might pay departments under service level agreements for supply of services; the assumption behind such an arrangement is that where there is internal trading there is a “sharpness to it” which means that the faculties cannot easily fail to deliver for the unit. Moreover, it is transparent what the generated income is contributing towards. This centralised approach involves a conscious step towards transaction visibility, and moves away from the “apportionment of overheads” as is common within HEIs.
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A critical evaluation of competency development in a professional accounting programme

A critical evaluation of competency development in a professional accounting programme

The assessment of the impact of PAS programme on candidates’ competency level is the primary aim of this study. The programme’s purpose is stated as the development of “higher level professional competencies in order that those admitted to the College [of Chartered Accountants] have an enhanced ability to address complex accounting and financial management issues and form judgements relating to those, given a range of business contexts”, (Advanced Business Education Ltd. (ABEL), 1999, p.1). McCourt-Larres and Oyelere (1999) and Albrecht (1995) provide evidence of a positive impact of carefully- designed training programmes on the development of certain skills in accountants and accounting students. Each training programme, or teaching technique is, however, unique and programme-specific reviews are required before conclusions can be drawn about a particular programme's efficacy. For the purpose of assessing the impact of ICANZ’s PAS programme on candidates' competency development, a null hypothesis is stated as follows:
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Formative Evaluation of an Advanced Professioanl Development Programme for University Teachers

Formative Evaluation of an Advanced Professioanl Development Programme for University Teachers

Focus group respondents agreed that the time of SUTQ meetings, which often took place in the afternoons and evenings, suited them. The most often mentioned reason was that had the meetings been scheduled earlier during the day, they would have likely interfered with other responsibilities of the participants. Much appreciated was also the availability of the planning of the SUTQ meetings before the commencement of the programme, so participants could have checked their agendas for potential clashes with other activities and possibly put the SUTQ meetings into their agendas. Participants also expressed appreciation for the venue where most meetings were located at, because they found it spacious and hidden from looks from passers-by and liked that the setting was different from where they typically work. Additionally, they mentioned preference for working at group tables to tables arranged in U- shape. Lastly, respondents showed appreciation for the provided catering. One respondent summarized it by saying “I like it that it is here and that you are here in the evening and you get a lunch, it’s also little treated. Because you put it the extra time and you get good food, you get nice drinks and that’s sort of a little reward for joining this and that’s what I really like, better coffee. That’s really something extra.” Overall, the contextual aspect of the programme was perceived as important to participants’ satisfaction with the programme.
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Workforce development strategy : retail

Workforce development strategy : retail

Student Records (ISR) for 2000-2001 shows the relatively low numbers of students enrolled in further education institutions in London East on retail programmes. There is also a very poor retention rate with less than half the people enrolled completing their courses. The problem is most acute among full-time students and the 16 to 18 age range. The highest achievement level among students who completed was to be found on part-time courses. However, when those achievements are set against the original enrolment numbers, the success rates are low. The Skills Dialogue identified 28 universities offering courses in retail management or retail specialist subjects. As an academic discipline it does not have a separate categorisation in the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) programme area listing.
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Workforce development strategy : manufacturing

Workforce development strategy : manufacturing

The Centre for Engineering and Manufacturing Excellence has been established on 18 acres of land at the Ford plant in Dagenham. This venture will support innovative small businesses, and promote leading-edge manufacturing and technological developments. It will support the “nation’s higher-education capacity in manufacturing and engineering.” A second initiative is the launch of the Manufacturing Advisory Service for London. This is part of a nationwide programme under the auspices of the DTI. The service, which will provide support for small manufacturers, will be delivered by Business Link for London in conjunction with the Engineering Employers’ Federation South, who will provide a team of specialists to give advice. The Manufacturing Advisory Service will give access to training materials and provide workshops among a range of support activities.
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Special Educational Needs and Disability Pathfinder Programme Evaluation Thematic Report: Key working and workforce development (pt 1)

Special educational needs and disability pathfinder programme evaluation : thematic report : key working and workforce development (pt 1). Research report, January 2014

SQW was commissioned by the Department for Education to lead a consortium of organisations to undertake the Evaluation of the SEND Pathfinder Programme. A series of reports from the study are available on the government publications website 1 . During the course of the research, a number of key issues were identified as requiring more in- depth thematic review. This report focuses on one of these issues – key working and workforce development.

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Evaluation of the Restorative Practice Programme of the Childhood Development Initiative

Evaluation of the Restorative Practice Programme of the Childhood Development Initiative

Studies have examined RP approaches in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. For example, there is evidence that RP has been adopted in the Greater Shankill Alternatives in West Belfast to alleviate tensions between Unionist and Nationalist factions (McEvoy, 2006). Wilson’s (2011) evaluation of the RP programme in Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin, shows that strides have been made towards advancing RP in schools. The relationship between the school principal and other staff members had been strengthened and the staff felt that they were able to engage more with children from disadvantaged and vulnerable backgrounds. Training strategies that were utilised in Dun Laoghaire were seen as beneficial for advancing restorative approaches. Out of a total school staff of 23, 13 were trained, along with 8 Special Needs Assistants (SNAs). This meant that there was a greater opportunity to engage with different staff members and instil a more widespread RP ethos among staff. Wilson also identified evidence of a number of developments in Dun Laoghaire promoted by a local education centre to further advance RP, including the use of RP in supporting the organic development of schools, giving people a voice, promoting common themes, and interdisciplinary and multi-agency working in favour of enhancing the provision offered to failing children and young people (Wilson, 2011, p. 23).
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Process Evaluation of Community Energy Development Programme Projects

Process Evaluation of Community Energy Development Programme Projects

In addition, at 6 months it is arguably too early to assess which interventions are most effective and whether CEDP projects and the CEDP approach are contributing to development outcomes. However an analysis of different types of capital (as expressed by the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework in terms of human, natural, financial, social and physical) points to comprehensive changes in human and social capital. CEDP projects have contributed to building human capital improvements in terms of health, education, knowledge and skills. Solar PV installations in educational institutions and solar water pumps have produced the greatest increase in social capital through improvements in trust, decision making and leadership. Solar PV installations and solar lanterns also increased the network and connection assets through mobile phone charging facilities. Cookstove projects singularly contributed to the increase in natural assets of forestry and both solar lanterns and cookstoves provided immediate benefits to levels of financial capital in terms of savings and access to credit.
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Evaluation of the Early Years Programme of the Childhood Development Initiative

Evaluation of the Early Years Programme of the Childhood Development Initiative

When it is considered that a successful programme should be replicable, the differences in implementation alluded to in the Early Years practitioner focus groups (and acknowledged by CDI staff consultation) could point to a dilution of programme effects. This, in turn, points to the need for a balancing act between services being community-led and evidence-informed. In the case of scientific evaluations, it is important to have an emphasis on the evidence base at all times. It is important that the significant role played by the delivery organisation (i.e. CDI) – in ensuring rigorous and replicable implementation of a programme – not be underestimated. Where contradictions exist between a delivery agency’s ethos and the implementation of a programme, there should be one clear message emerging for those who are delivering the programme on the ground, so that any grey areas do not lead to differential delivery and therefore dilution of effects. That CDI left scope for PCFs, for example, to deal differently with parents as a function of the PCFs’ previous experience and training is not necessarily a negative thing, particularly for parents (who most likely received at least some form of support that they required and appreciated). It is only when it comes to isolating the success of individual manual components in a quantitative way that such an approach becomes problematic. A purely qualitative design is better suited to unpicking the mechanisms that underlie the development and implementation of a novel role such as the PCF and this underlines the importance of choosing a research design that maps very clearly onto programme outcomes when research is at the commissioning stage. Where effects are not found, it does not mean that positives did not occur, but perhaps indicates that there was a mismatch between the research model and programme outcomes. Given that it transpired that the CDI Early Years Programme was bedding-in for at least the first phase of programme implementation, perhaps a formative rather than a summative evaluation would have been the more suitable method for examining programme outcomes.
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Regional development in Greece: An evaluation of the effectiveness of the Industrial Areas Programme

Regional development in Greece: An evaluation of the effectiveness of the Industrial Areas Programme

The agglomeration index Ui is the percentage of population in any one region that live in urban agglomerations over 10,000 people. The agglomeration index U 2 is constructed to show the percentage of the population of the single largest urban centre of each region. The assistance indices are first, A i, for the total state support in manufacturing in the form of grants (of Law 1 2 6 2 /19 8 2 ) that were destined to the region from the initiation of the Law in 1982 to 1993. Second, A 2 , for the ratio of the above support over total investment carried out in the region. Data for this are obtained by the Ministry of National Economy of Greece, (MNE, unpublished). The spatial dimension of the above indices is illustrated in Figure 4-9 for the urbanisation levels and in Figure 4 -10 for the distribution of support in absolute terms. There is an indication, that is going to be tested next, that although the structure of assistance over the national territory, (Law 1 2 6 2 /19 8 2 ), shown in Figure 4-1 0, features increased intensity of assistance for the peripheral regions, assistance in absolute terms remains quite centralised. In fact the region having received the highest support is Thessaloniki and its small neighbouring, highly assisted Department of Kilkis. Equally the large industrial activity of the capital Athens is assisted to 'decentralise' few miles along the motorway to the north in the neighbouring Departments of Viotia and Fthiotis. All the islands and most part of the southern and central/western peripheries have received small amounts of support. The Industrial Areas Programme has the advantage that it specifically prescribes the targets for development than rather 'blanket' covering the national territory; but the focus in this section -only- is on agglomeration and the national assistance scheme. Some of the above indications are going to be tested empirically next.
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An Investigation on the Evaluation of Employee Training and Development Programme at Company X

An Investigation on the Evaluation of Employee Training and Development Programme at Company X

qualifications and so employee T&D programmes were not successfully implemented. Employees perceive training and development programme as an act to settle the BBBEE scorecard. This objective was also achieved because interviews concurred with Ekot (2010) who stated that “the quality of an organisation‟s training affects its value, he adds that untrained or poorly trained employees cost significantly more than well-trained employee do”. The final objective of the study was to bring about some recommendations for a more targeted T&D programme to the management. Conducted interviews indicated that managers suggested a new T&D system which was in line with “global business performance developmental practices”. This study also revealed the importance of transfer of and access to T&D information as this will largely influence employee T&D, if employees are made aware of employee T&D programmes they become motivated to participate in such a programme. This study also revealed the need of a leadership/management development programme, customer service, project management, career development programme, system training, and organisational development programmes. Some interviewees pointed out that the multiple T&D programmes were ideal to avoid biases and have a better picture of the company‟s development programmes. Results of the study confirm that training and development strategy was not correctly carried out at the company. The findings reveal that although the respondents were aware of the various aspects of training and development, there was no strategic framework in place as the foundation for training and development strategy even though management indicated that training and development was part of the organisation‟s strategy. The conclusions drawn for the findings related to management and employees indicated that:
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Exploring academic development programme evaluation at a university: A systematic scholarly approach

Exploring academic development programme evaluation at a university: A systematic scholarly approach

Within a context of a third generation of AD (Boughey 2007), the AD Centre’s Indaba provided opportunities for reflection on, and informal analysis of its AD offerings. This led to a conceptualisation of a programme-based approach to AD, which contributed to the structure of the AD focus, by providing general, as well as, specific structural elements. These included format, purpose, approach, alignment with other programmes, role-players and roles, processes and procedures, and programme outcomes. (Table 5). The diverse complexity of the emerging AD programmes both enriched and fragmented the programme-based approach adopted by the Centre. For example, horizontal and vertical non-alignment required not only evaluation and redesign of the individual programmes, but it also highlighted the need for a new generic programme design contextualised within the HE system. The CHE (2017, 16) states that the “role of academics as teachers encompass teaching as delivery, programme design, evaluation, and the scholarship of teaching and learning”. Building capacity through systemic and collaborative research between academic developers, and academics allows for professional learning on both sides (CHE 2017, 17).
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Development of the learning programme management and evaluation scale for the South African skills development context

Development of the learning programme management and evaluation scale for the South African skills development context

The newly developed LPME scale consisted of 113 items, measuring the elemental aspects outlined in the theoretical framework proposed by Tshilongamulenzhe (2012). The instrument used a six-point likert scale with a response format ranging from ‘strongly agree’ to ‘strongly disagree’. Construct validity and internal consistency reliabilities were examined by means of exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Unidimensionality of the refined LPME scale was assessed by means of Rasch analysis. The dimensions included in this scale were: strategic leadership, policy awareness, environmental scanning, stakeholder inputs, administrative process, quality assurance, learning programme design and development, learning programme specifications, observation and problem solving, monitoring and evaluation, and occupational competence. Sample items included (1) Occupational learning programme content must cover all aspects that are needed in the workplace and related to a specific occupation; (2) The skills development provider, mentor and supervisor must be knowledgeable about an occupation for which the learner is training; (3) The design of the practical modules must incorporate practical skills that will enable learners to fulfil relevant occupational responsibility; (4) Policies must be in place for learner entry, guidance and support system; and (5) The nomination or selection of experienced workplace mentors and supervisors must be handled carefully with the objectives of the programme in mind.
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Development and evaluation of a computer-based medical work assessment programme

Development and evaluation of a computer-based medical work assessment programme

technology can support the collection of such data. A computer-based job task activity programme was devel- oped and evaluated to analyse physicians' working behav- iours. Based on results, medical work routines as well as organizational context factors can be examined with a per- spective to identify suggestions for improvements for health professionals' work organization.

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Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Childhood Development Initiative's Healthy Schools Programme

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Childhood Development Initiative's Healthy Schools Programme

Interpretivist approaches to evaluation explore the meanings that programme participants place on the experiences they have of a programme. This approach is based on the idea that all participants involved in the programme (and evaluators) have their own interpretation, experience, claims as to what a programme involves and its impact in practice. The focus of evaluation is an examination of the complexity itself: the processes of reasoning, negotiations, persuasions, advocacy that have occurred during programme implementation (Tones and Tilford, 2001) with a view to moving towards consensus about how to move the project forward in the local context (Guba and Lincoln, 1989). A critique of this approach is that findings are mostly relative to each situation or local context: that people in different situations, localities or contexts would place different meanings on, or have different experiences of, the same programme. Therefore, the evidence generated from one study cannot be generalised to other equivalent situations (Pawson and Tilley, 1997). A realist approach, on the other hand, is concerned with the transformation process itself, i.e. the transformation of, for example, a ‘system’, ‘structural condition’ or a ‘person’ examining if the desired changes in structures and processes are achieved as a result of an intervention. This approach is based on the idea that the transformation process does not occur merely through the introduction of an intervention, but through the additional factor of how people interact with that intervention or programme. To map the transformation process, it requires a description of programme interventions along with an identification of how the intervention is interacted with by social actors (i.e. the logic/reasoning that is ascribed to the intervention by social actors) and how this generates consequent outcomes that are in line with original aims and objectives. Importantly though, a person’s reasoning or logic in relation to an intervention is informed by wider (e.g. systemic, organisational, personal) circumstances or contexts. Therefore, an understanding of how these circumstances impact on the logic that an individual or group applies to an intervention will elucidate what it is that facilitates or inhibits the desired change. In this approach, change or transformation is viewed as being generated as a result of the way that programme characteristics and people’s logic or reasoning interplay in practice.
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Cumbria PFT: Leadership Development Programme: interim evaluation report

Cumbria PFT: Leadership Development Programme: interim evaluation report

Perhaps one of the most striking themes, from the outset, relates to participants’ self-reflections of in response to the LDP. Not captured in the quantitative data, the issue of optimism and inspiration springs entirely from qualitative feedback. With particular, though not exclusive, respect to the Introductory Day, participants recurrently identified how the programme had reinforced, or reaffirmed, their own faith in themselves and the trust. Candid interactions with upper management, and the reassurance provided thereby in terms of the value of leaders within CPFT, proved an excellent and optimistic tone-setting exercise.
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Evaluation of a primary care triumvirate leadership development programme

Evaluation of a primary care triumvirate leadership development programme

Staff who demonstrate effective leadership behaviours are at the forefront of any future primary care transformation. By empowering and engaging self and others to work differently within a changing clinical context, good leaders are better able to plan and provide a vision for the future of their organisations. Indeed Ham, McKenna and Dunn (2016) report how better outcomes can be delivered by engaging clinical teams in reducing variations and changing the way care is delivered. However there is evidence of underinvestment in leadership development for staff working within the field of primary care.
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The UK Futures Programme : the strategic role and influence of supply chains in workforce development : thematic paper

The UK Futures Programme : the strategic role and influence of supply chains in workforce development : thematic paper

Having noted the differences across the Productivity Challenges and projects that they contained, it is notable that the findings emerging about the supply chains are remarkably consistent. They largely replicate across Challenges, with similar issues arising, approaches to development and delivery, and key learning points. As a result, the key lessons that are set out below largely mirror those from Productivity Challenge 2, which was the most explicitly focussed on this agenda. However, they take on added weight because of the greater evidence on which they are based.

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