Top PDF Evaluation of the Pupil Deprivation Grant. Final report, December 2017

Evaluation of the Pupil Deprivation Grant. Final report, December 2017

Evaluation of the Pupil Deprivation Grant. Final report, December 2017

6.19 Schools are using sophisticated data systems to track individual pupil progress against agreed targets. Systems typically pre-date the introduction of the PDG but are now being used to track disadvantaged learners progress more closely. These systems flagged potential indicators associated with the risk of pupils not achieving their full potential, such as eFSM, LAC, EAL, SEN and so on. Data was monitored for attainment against targets across a range of subjects, attendance, and in some cases behaviour. These data were reviewed regularly, usually termly or every half term. The monitoring often involved meetings of class teachers and a member of the SLT or a member of staff responsible for additional learning needs or special educational needs to review progress for each pupil and determine appropriate additional support for each. Most schools reported collecting measures of pupil well-being and self-esteem in addition to attendance and attainment measures. For example, many reported using Boxall Assessments, or the Pupil Attitudes to School and Self (PASS) survey.
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Evaluation of the Pupil Deprivation Grant. Final report, December 2017

Evaluation of the Pupil Deprivation Grant. Final report, December 2017

2.1 Comisiynwyd Ipsos MORI a WISERD gan Lywodraeth Cymru yn Ebrill 2013 i gyflawni gwerthusiad o'r Grant Amddifadedd Disgyblion. Mae'r Grant Amddifadedd Disgyblion (GAD) yn elfen ganolog o ymdrechion polisi Llywodraeth Cymru i gau'r bwlch cyrhaeddiad rhwng plant o deuluoedd mwy a llai cefnog. Lansiwyd y GAD yn 2012 ac mae'n darparu cyllid atodol i ysgolion yn seiliedig ar y nifer o ddisgyblion ar eu cofrestr sy'n gymwys i gael Prydau Ysgol am Ddim (eFSM) neu sy'n Blant sy'n Derbyn Gofal (LAC). Ers Ebrill 2015, mae cyllid GAD ar gyfer disgyblion eFSM a LAC wedi ei ddarparu trwy ddwy ffrwd wahanol: Darperir cyllid GAD ar gyfer disgyblion eFSM yn uniongyrchol i'r ysgol, tra bod cyllid GAD ar gyfer LAC wedi ei ddarparu i'r consortia. Yn Ebrill 2016, roedd GAD ac EYGAD ar gael i ddysgwyr cymwys mewn Unedau Cyfeirio Disgyblion; mae rhai o ddysgwyr mwyaf difreintiedig Cymru yn cael eu haddysgu mewn Unedau Cyfeirio Disgyblion ac yn flaenorol nid oeddynt wedi eu cefnogi gan y cyllid ychwanegol sydd ar gael trwy GAD. Mae'r gwerthusiad hwn yn canolbwyntio'n bennaf ar gyllid GAD ar gyfer disgyblion eFSM. 2.2 Awgryma canllaw Llywodraeth Cymru i ysgolion y dylent wario'r cyllid atodol ar
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Strategic report 2017 on the implementation of the European Structural and Investment Funds  Commission staff working document accompanying the report from the Commission  SWD (2017) 452 final, 13 December 2017

Strategic report 2017 on the implementation of the European Structural and Investment Funds Commission staff working document accompanying the report from the Commission SWD (2017) 452 final, 13 December 2017

For transport (TO7), the evaluations reviewed were mainly on infrastructure projects in the EU12 Member States in the 2007-2013 period. They found little evidence of impact since the effects needed time to materialise. A number of issues, however, were identified as regards project selection and management. These related to the burden involved in preparing applications for funding which is seen as disproportionate and the excessive weight given to the price in project selection. Some evaluations also highlighted the fact that, due to the crisis, prices fell and many projects were therefore completed at lower cost than originally planned. A Hungarian evaluation assessed the effects on social inclusion and poverty reduction of integrated urban development plans that were implemented by the 7 regional OPs in 2007- 2013 (TO9). It indicated that 77 social urban renewal projects were carried out and living conditions and access to public services were improved as a result, but it failed to identify any significant impact on employment or social conditions. It found that the partnerships put in place to develop and implement the plans involved officials from municipalities as well as local stakeholders were not permanent but created ad hoc. The evaluation pointed to the need for more integrated development strategies among these and for more account to be taken of the specific needs of the communities concerned and the local business sector.
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Inspiring equality in education grant evaluation : final report

Inspiring equality in education grant evaluation : final report

evaluation). Two were officially faith schools. School locations included inner- city Bristol, “leafy suburb” areas, the “commuter belt”, and those described as “rural”. In terms of pupil demographics, these were mixed. Some of the schools were known to be in areas of high deprivation, with many pupils from low economic bac kgrounds, whilst others were much more varied, “from the very poorest families to some of the most well off”. A number of schools described their in - take as “very much white British” or “not very diverse really”, whilst one had a large proportion of students for whom English was an additional language, originally “coming from various different countries... so a teacher in any average lesson could be expected to have children of five different languages all in the same room”. Ofsted results also varied, from those in ‘special measures’ or requiring
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Evaluation of the implementation of the Pupil Development Grant for Looked After Children : final report

Evaluation of the implementation of the Pupil Development Grant for Looked After Children : final report

relationships education in supporting LAC in education, although no evidence was identified to support the effectiveness of supportive interventions in these areas. Starks (2013) reports that care-experienced students emphasised their reliance on advice and support in applying for higher education, but 41% stated they received no information regarding support for care leavers, though it is not clear whether this was desired from schools or from universities themselves. Focussing on the need for healthy relationships education, recent research in Wales found that young people in care or leaving care are more likely to become parents at a young age than the general population (Roberts et al., 2017). Furthermore, data from the Wales Adoption Cohort Study reveals that more than a quarter (27%) of birth mothers and a fifth (19%) of birth fathers with children placed for adoption were themselves care leavers.
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Evaluation of the Pupil Deprivation Grant - 2nd interim report

Evaluation of the Pupil Deprivation Grant - 2nd interim report

analytical approach is to compare the relative achievement of eFSM pupils versus non-FSM pupils – many of which could be in the same schools as eFSM pupils. This assumes that the Pupil Deprivation Grant only has an impact on eFSM pupils in each school, which according to our analysis on the different ways that the grant is applied as detailed above is not always the case. Nevertheless, the main aim of the Pupil Deprivation Grant is to reduce the ‘gap’ between the educational outcomes of eFSM pupils and non-FSM pupils – so that is what this analysis presents. However, it is still possible that any reduction in the ‘gap’ in outcomes (we prefer to use the term percentage (%) differential) over these two years could be due to the impact of other interventions or general improvements in the educational system.
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Tadpoles Evaluation : Final Report

Tadpoles Evaluation : Final Report

Three parents observed that by learning the principles behind the activities they were able to, firstly, understand how some of what they were already doing promoted attachment and, secondly, incorporate these principles into other activities which the child enjoyed engaging in with them. Moreover, parents report that once they understood the principles of the games they were able to modify these according to their and their child’s preferences and/or familiarity with similar activities:

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Selfies evaluation : final report

Selfies evaluation : final report

As Barnardo’s have recently acknowledged, “There is little in the way of educational resources or general information that provides advice to LGBTQ young people about what a healthy relationship is” (Fox, 2016: 6). This, together with the evaluation findings, suggests that should Selfies work be continued, it would be fulfilling an identified need, and able to offer variety in both scope and delivery methods according to the needs of the young people recruited. If this was extended to larger groups of young people and/or larger geographical areas (assuming there was not already similar provision in place) it seems this would only be beneficial. The Selfies project therefore makes the case for LGBT youth work within which young people are offered different ways of thinking about their potential for ‘safe’ and happy sex and relationships. This is particularly important given the ongoing absence of (statutory) LGBT-inclusive SRE. However, whilst everybody valued Selfies, almost everyone simultaneously called for improved school-based SRE. It would seem that there is a consensus that whatever is provided within ‘informal’ SRE needs to be reinforced and/or
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Children's Community evaluation 2017 report

Children's Community evaluation 2017 report

Figure 3.1 over the page lays out an initial change model for the Children's Community programme, utilising the concept of a maturity model, often used in the context of school improvement 6 . This early model will be revisited, and refined, as the programme and evaluation develop, and as learning from the programme informs understanding of the ways in which the Children's Communities are progressing. In this model there are three distinct, but potentially overlapping phases: in the building phase, the community creates the Children's Community partnership, and undertakes early work to frame the approach - identifying issues, working out the focus, gathering evidence, creating a governance structure and aligning community priorities with the services and organisations engaged in it (as well as the core Children's Community principles). Some early, partnership-building activities and programmes may take place during this phase. The Community will gradually move into the development phase, when a coherent set of activities is implemented, and monitored in relation to changes they aim to engender in the short and medium term at different system levels. In the final, most mature embedding phase, the community becomes more self-sustaining and focuses on longer term change, necessarily continually monitoring and amending the activities undertaken and also monitoring and amending/extending the partnership in relation to governance and engagement of partners and stakeholders (indicated by the arrows).
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Evaluation of Over2You : Final report

Evaluation of Over2You : Final report

In total 61 volunteers completed both the initial questionnaire and at least one follow- up questionnaire by March 2017. The analysis presented below looks at the baseline and latest response received from these 61 volunteers and examines any change which has occurred. In considering these outcomes it is important to recognise that Over2You volunteers were themselves users of a range of health and social care services, include some with complex long-term physical health conditions and some with mental health problems and mild to moderate learning difficulties.
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How to strengthen the European Semester? CEPS Research Report No  2017/15, December 2017

How to strengthen the European Semester? CEPS Research Report No 2017/15, December 2017

provides guidance to them by issuing country specific recommendations (CSRs), which are the main output of the Semester. This process reflects a much wider concept of coordination than the one associated with the notion of fiscal stance, which has only been introduced recently. Despite its short history, the European Semester has already been subject to change, both in terms of process and content, and more is yet to come. Indeed, the reflection paper on deepening the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) published by the European Commission (2017) in May 2017, puts considerable emphasis on the European Semester as a key tool for policy coordination. In particular, the paper suggests that the Semester could be further reinforced by fostering cooperation and dialogue among member states at different levels to ensure stronger domestic ownership and to encourage a better implementation of reforms. In this framework, a closer link between the yearly process of the European Semester and a more multi-annual approach to reforms should also be envisaged. This should help to gauge divergences as well as to identify means to ensure proper re-convergence.
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The Key Evaluation Final Report

The Key Evaluation Final Report

The positioning of The Key within an existing offer of service provision was also important in relation to successful delivery. It has been recognised that non-statutory services are ideally placed to provide holistic support for women with complex needs (Radcliffe et al 2013). The importance of providing a non-judgemental and non-stigmatising service was also important for the success of The Key. A recent report suggests that interventions with young women must work in different ways to statutory bodies; as young women often have a deep-seated mistrust of helping professionals who have failed them in the past (McNeish and Scott, 2014). Young women see specialist workers within women-centred
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Evaluation of Cymorth: final report

Evaluation of Cymorth: final report

3.19 The local flexibility that was anticipated for the programme – and built into its procedures –clearly resulted in a large number of relatively small scale projects being funded with significant variation between areas in terms of themes, delivery focus and methods. The small scale of the initiatives, their large number and local variations do not appear to have diminished over the period to 2007/08, even though there might have been some expectation that integration of the previous five funding streams might have seen a reduction in the number of projects and an increase in their scale. There was also no reduction in the proportion of central and evaluation costs in total funding that might have been expected from integration of the previous funding regimes although allowance should be made for the costs associated with setting up and running the Partnerships.
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Evaluation of Pupil Premium

Evaluation of Pupil Premium

Fieldwork for the case studies was guided by a protocol (see appendix 2, where further details of the methodology are also provided). Schools were sent a list of organising questions and a copy of the finance data sheet in advance (unless they had completed this as part of the survey). Although the sample of interviewees varied with the type and structure of the school, it typically included the head teacher, the school business manager, the senior leader responsible for work on educational disadvantage (for instance the Inclusion Manager), and staff members managing relevant budgets. Interviews with ‘external’ stakeholders (such as governors and local authority officers) were held where they played a significant role in deciding how Pupil Premium funding should be used (though in reality nearly all decisions about the Premium were handled ‘in-house’). There was considerable variation in the length of fieldwork, but it tended to comprise an initial visit to secure a strategic overview of the school’s response to the Pupil Premium, leading to a second visit and follow-up telephone interviews where more detailed questions could be asked. Relevant documentary evidence was also collected where available, including the school’s account of its use of Pupil Premium funding on its website, and the latest Ofsted report on the school. Some schools were able to supply additional material such as internal reports on their use of the Pupil Premium, or detailed listings of the activities it funded.
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Simple but effective: Local solutions for adults facing multiple deprivation Adults facing Chronic Exclusion evaluation – final report

Simple but effective: Local solutions for adults facing multiple deprivation Adults facing Chronic Exclusion evaluation – final report

At the close of the evaluation, five of the pilots had secured continuation funding. The first pilot to secure continuation funding was Cyrenians, which secured funding from the Public Health Team in the NHS and Newcastle City Council and is now integrated into the local response to chronic exclusion. Other pilots have strong local support and have gained, or are likely to gain, part funding to continue for at least one more year. Some pilots have more uncertain mainstreaming prospects, despite the good reports from local partners of their work. One pilot is unlikely to receive mainstream funding once the Adults facing Chronic Exclusion programme ends and has begun to wind down its services.
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Inquiry into A Level standards. Final report, December 2002

Inquiry into A Level standards. Final report, December 2002

33. First, a sample of students’ work and other information is used to determine the mark which should define each grade boundary for each unit. Those grade boundaries are then translated into fixed points on a uniform mark scale (UMS). The range covered by this scale varies between units. For a 0-100 scale, the ranges of scores for each grade are: E=40-49, D=50-59, C=60-69, B=70-79, A=80-100. The scores for each grade boundary on scales which are less or greater than 100 will be proportionately lower or higher. From that, individual students’ marks for each unit are translated into a UMS score for the unit. Marks which lie between two grade boundaries on the raw mark scale will translate into intermediate points between the same two boundaries on the UMS scale. The UMS scores for individual units are then added together to give an overall UMS score for the subject as a whole. The maximum total UMS score is always 600. The final A level grade is awarded based on where the overall score lies in relation to fixed points on this 600 point scale (ie E=240 to 299, D=300 to 359…).
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Grant Outcomes Report

Grant Outcomes Report

PREss ConfEREnCE. A press conference announcing the re-opening of Brooklyn HealthWorks took place on October 11, 2007, at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts in downtown Brooklyn. outREaCH to BRokERs. The Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce reached out to brokers through conducting four broker seminars and informational meetings. It also mailed postcards directly to licensed brokers in Brooklyn and surrounding counties. The Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce also increased the number of brokers actively selling Brooklyn HealthWorks. At the end of the grant period, 55 brokers were actively selling Brooklyn HealthWorks, up 175% from 20 brokers in January 2008. maRkEtInG. A variety of branded marketing items were designed and created with the Brooklyn HealthWorks logo, including mouse pads, pens, note pads, coffee mugs, and water bottles. These items allowed Brooklyn HealthWorks to create consistent branding as it interacted with insurance brokers and small employers at business trade shows and other forums. Broker kits, fact sheets with current monthly premium rates, and professional stationary were also developed and disseminated to approximately 5,000 brokers.
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Northern Ireland Multiple Deprivation Measures 2017

Northern Ireland Multiple Deprivation Measures 2017

Maximum Likelihood Factor Analysis is a type of common factor analysis that has been selected to estimate weights for the indicator ranks in NIMDM 2017. Importantly, the method, which does not depend on the scale of measurement of the input indicators, is appropriate where indicators are not perfectly reliable and may contain measurement errors. Factor analysis can only be used when there are at least three indicators. As the deprivation indicators were agreed a priori of the analysis, a further condition on the use of factor analysis was that all resulting factors scores had positive values. The default for domains/ sub-domains where these conditions were not met was to use equal weights. The final step was to scale the scores from the first factor to turn them into weights which summed to one. In the NIMDM 2017, factor analysis was used in the Health Deprivation and Disability Domain, the Education, Skills and Training Deprivation Domain, the Housing Quality sub-domain and the Crime sub-domain.
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The Way Forward Evaluation Final Report

The Way Forward Evaluation Final Report

The costs illustrated in table 6.3 are indicative of the value of having a preventative approach when working with vulnerable young women. Marker et al (2013) argue that there is an evidence base from both well-designed observational studies and clinical trials showing the effectiveness of interventions that address risk factors to health. Moreover, they argue that interventions targeted at children often have the most potential to be cost- effective because of the longer time over which any resulting benefits might be realised. This is important in relation to mental health outcomes, and relevant to The Way Forward because of the focus upon emotional support and holistic intervention that has been evidenced within this evaluation report.
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An evaluation of the IRIS network. Final report

An evaluation of the IRIS network. Final report

The study is based on four different sources of information; an overview of training and employment for women in each of the Member States, interviews with representatives of European pr[r]

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