Top PDF Evaluation of Schools Challenge Cymru : implementation in Pathways to Success Schools (2014/15)

Evaluation of Schools Challenge Cymru :
implementation in Pathways to Success Schools
(2014/15)

Evaluation of Schools Challenge Cymru : implementation in Pathways to Success Schools (2014/15)

AIBs have sought to exercise their support function. Broadly in line with the expectations of the Welsh Government, the interviewees in just under two-thirds (24 of 37) of the PtS clusters we visited indicated that the primary role of the AIB had been to review the progress of the PtS school in implementing their SDP (in many cases termed a School Improvement Plan, or SIP). In a number Group A schools, interviewees indicated that, for a large portion of the first year of the programme, the school had not had a SDP in place, or self-evaluation infrastructure was weak. In such cases, interviewees reflected that the AIB meetings had often lacked the structure/tools necessary to hold Senior Leaders to account for their performance. As one Headteacher noted ‘I am happy to present the most recent batch of [performance] data but we all know that it is largely meaningless’ (Headteacher, PtS School). In such cases, it appears that the focus of AIB meetings was often monitoring the
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Evaluation of Schools Challenge Cymru

Evaluation of Schools Challenge Cymru

1.12 In 2015, just over 11% (339) of the secondary pupils were from schools identified as Group A (14% of the Year 7 cohort and 9% of the Year 9 cohort) compared to 37% (1,100 pupils) in Group B and 52% in Group C schools (1,577 pupils). 5 While the various tests used in the analysis (see Annexes C and E) are designed to explore the statistical significance of any emerging differences between the school Groups, the responding pupils from Group A schools represented only three of the eight schools classified in this way (that is, just over one third). Five of the schools in this category chose not to administer the survey in 2014/15, and, in the participating schools, pupil responses were received from a mean of 68 pupils per school, per cohort. This suggests that only some classes and/or some pupils were asked to take part in these schools. It is likely, therefore, that the respondents may not have been fully representative of the Group A schools either at school level or at pupil level.
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Evaluation of Schools Challenge Cymru

Evaluation of Schools Challenge Cymru

patterns are similarly mixed, although the differential with respect to the Welsh average is far less. In both cases, unauthorised absence rates were on a downward trajectory from 2010/11 to 2013/14, but then increased in the 2014/15 and 2015/16 academic years, after the introduction of SCC. This is a challenging finding, since reducing unauthorised absence was central to action planning in most PtS schools. In some instances (possibly most), the increase may have reflected better monitoring (with fewer instances of truancy passing un-recorded). In others, however, it may have reflected a higher level of challenge (both pastorally and academically) to pupils leading to an
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Evaluation of Schools Challenge Cymru

Evaluation of Schools Challenge Cymru

performance had been stable over three years, continuing that stability over SCC would not have been a reasonable indicator of success. In a school in which levels of attainment had been gradually improving prior to SCC, one might expect that the rate of improvement after two years might increase. 3.7 It is worth examining this with reference to some performance data for the Level 2 Inclusive (L2I) 10 outcomes for the different groups of schools. This shows that, in the four academic years prior to the implementation of SCC, all three groups of schools (A, B & C) had a relatively high proportion of pupils who failed to achieve Level 5 or 6 (the expected level) at Key Stage 3 in English and/or Welsh and maths. 11 On average, across the four years prior to SCC, 33% of the pupils in Group A schools, 31% of those in Group B and 29% of those in Group C were unsuccessful in attaining the expected level at age 14. The proportion of these same pupils who then went on to achieve L2I was low: only four per cent of pupils in each case were successful in reaching expectations at Key Stage 4.
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Vol 4, No 1 (2019)

Vol 4, No 1 (2019)

healthy school program. Next is the division of tasks, the division of tasks is absolutely done so that there is no accumulation of work one point and emptiness at another point other than that so as not to cause overlap in the implementation of work. with the division of heavy work tasks, it becomes light because it is done together. Likewise in fixing facilities and infrastructures that support healthy school programs, it is necessary to develop tasks so that the activities to be carried out can be completed on time. The implementation is divided into two task areas, namely for activities that involve physical and environmental improvement of the school carried out by some teachers, students and assisted by parents, the community and participation from cross-sectoral agencies namely the police and the TNI, while those related to technical work are done by teacher of UKS coach and Puskesmas staff. In the activities of parents and school committees, the community and PKK and the Police and TNI are very proactive in supporting these activities.
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The annual report of Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of
education, children’s services and skills 2014/15

The annual report of Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of education, children’s services and skills 2014/15

After a judgement of satisfactory for overall effectiveness in May 2012, and requires improvement in February 2014, Gateshead College, a general FE college, achieved an outstanding grade for all aspects of its provision in June 2015. At the two previous inspections, learners’ progress was slow and too many of them failed to complete their courses. Managers had not taken effective action to drive improvements, especially in the quality of teaching, learning and assessment. By the time inspectors visited the college last June, a dynamic and inspirational Principal, ably supported by a highly skilled senior team and governors, had successfully developed and delivered a clear and ambitious vision for learners that had led to significant improvements throughout the college. The governing body left no stone unturned in its scrutiny of progress against agreed targets for improvement. All staff had responded well to the more stringent performance management scheme that had a direct impact on improving the quality of teaching in all subject areas. Outstanding teaching and learning prepared learners very well for their next step and a high proportion of learners achieved their qualifications.
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Review of Learning Gardens and Sustainability Education: Bringing Life to Schools and Schools to Life.

Review of Learning Gardens and Sustainability Education: Bringing Life to Schools and Schools to Life.

For Williams and Brown, sensory educative experiences with the soil of learning gardens stand in stark contrast to the inauthentic and sterile life experiences many students now have in schools as a result of teaching and learning environments that are heavily mediated with technology. In the age of “smart boards” and social media, heavy reliance on technology such as computers disconnects students from real engagement with life. The authors point out that this artificially constructed state of being is essentially a disconnection from our humanness – our sensory capacities.
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A study of the effective implementation of Ministry of education policy guidelines for Free primary education in Lugari District, Western Province, Kenya

A study of the effective implementation of Ministry of education policy guidelines for Free primary education in Lugari District, Western Province, Kenya

Reports by MoEST (Republic of Kenya, 2004b) on monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of FPE indicate that in some schools, consultation between the education managers and stake[r]

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Academies and free schools: Government response to the Committee's fourth report of session 2014-15 fourth special report of session 2014-15

Academies and free schools: Government response to the Committee's fourth report of session 2014-15 fourth special report of session 2014-15

Academies are increasingly choosing to collaborate, and we will continue to encourage and support them to do this through policy development, funding and other incentives. It would, however, be disproportionate to renegotiate all existing funding agreements to make this a requirement. It would also be wrong to create a system of school inspection that penalises heads who have chosen to focus their efforts on improving their school. Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector’s stated view on this is that “there are some schools which have got to “outstanding”, the headteacher has struggled to get it there, but it hasn’t got the capacity to support other schools. It would be unfair not to give it that “outstanding” rating if it deserved it.”
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CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF CONSTRUCTIVISM IN CONTEMPORARY TEACHING ENVIRONMENT   INCLUDING USERS (CHILDREN, TEACHERS, MANAGERS) PERSPECTIVE

CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF CONSTRUCTIVISM IN CONTEMPORARY TEACHING ENVIRONMENT INCLUDING USERS (CHILDREN, TEACHERS, MANAGERS) PERSPECTIVE

In this research article an effort has been made to analyze the concept of constructivism and its possible implementations in the current teaching – learning environment. The constructivist approach has been analysed from the point of view of learner, teacher, and managers. Focus of the research is to explore the points of agreement and disagreement between demands of contemporary education system and expected responsibilities assigned by this approach. By observing teaching learning practices directly and indirectly and gathering the information on current and upcoming system of education from related resources certain conclusions have been drawn which unfold the areas where we need to emphasise for the success of approach (constructivist) and system (Education) partnership.
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Revitalizing rural schools: a challenge for Malaysia

Revitalizing rural schools: a challenge for Malaysia

region which is “challenged by population sparseness, high poverty, diverse ethnic groups, conservative political values, and faltering or weak economies” (Carlson & Buttram, 2004, p. 7). Carlson and Buttram carried out some interviews with the key people from each school and undertook some observations in the classrooms. Some relevant documents including the data from the test were also analyzed. The results showed that all schools were passionate with the implementation of the CSR model. “The most positive impact on CSR implementation was observing student progress throughout the process”(Carlson & Buttram, 2004, p. 11). All teachers in five schools were well aware of the importance of observing student progress regularly (i.e. daily and weekly). This process could give them clear information about the progresses that students have made. The teachers felt that their profession was well supported throughout the CSR project because schools could supply them with all their instructional need (e.g. books, CDs, videos, internet, software, etc) and provide them with in-house professional development for enhancing their teaching quality. Despite all these positive gains, teachers still felt stressed because of their overloaded teaching hours and they suggested the schools to recruit more teachers. The researchers, in the last part of their report, came to a general conclusion that “that rural isolation, small size, and limited fiscal and personnel resources do not necessarily limit a school’s capacity to improve” (p. 16).
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Schools as Antecedents of Teacher Burnout: A Case of Public Sector Schools in Lahore

Schools as Antecedents of Teacher Burnout: A Case of Public Sector Schools in Lahore

The knowledge about the prevalence of burnout rate among public school teachers worked as rudiments of running the further analysis. One of the purposes of the study was to measure the levels of burnout among school teachers thereby assessing the levels of burnout was done by following the range of scores given by Maslach (Maslach, Jackson, & Leiter, 1996). The knowledge of levels of burnout is important to understand the progression of burnout as each dimension proceeds to the next dimension. Most of the teachers were found with low level of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Moderate and high levels of EE, DP, and PA were also reported. It implies to make schools stress free environments.
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School census results, 2014

School census results, 2014

This Statistical First Release is based upon information collected by the Schools’ Census in January 2014. It reports information for the number of pupils by age, gender, free school meal eligibility, ethnicity and special educational needs, together with information on the number of schools, teachers and support staff. The tables provide all Wales information for each category listed, plus a breakdown to local authority (LA) level for schools, pupils, teachers and support staff.

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COLLABORATIVE CULTURE AS A CHALLENGE OF CONTEMPORARY SCHOOLS

COLLABORATIVE CULTURE AS A CHALLENGE OF CONTEMPORARY SCHOOLS

the elementary school act (Zakon o osnovni šoli, 1996, 2007) determines individual goals to be achieved by elementary education in the republic of slovenia. among them are to educate for mutual tolerance and respect for being different, willingness to cooperate, respect for human rights and basic freedoms and, consequently, develop the ability to live in a democratic society. the goals also determine that we should foster the feeling of citizenship and national identity as well as the knowledge of slovene history and culture, foster and preserve our own cultural tradition and at the same time learn about other cultures and foreign languages. the goals also stress that students should be taught about general cultural values and civilization stemming from european tradition and that schools should promote a well-coordinated cognitive, emotional, spiritual and social development of individuals.
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Success factors for ICT implementation in Saudi secondary schools : from the perspective of ICT directors, head teachers, teachers and students

Success factors for ICT implementation in Saudi secondary schools : from the perspective of ICT directors, head teachers, teachers and students

As in South Korea, Saudi Arabia has had a rapid growth in ICT however; the adaptation of e- learning and its acceptance has not been fully explored as an implementation strategy and there are limited empirical studies that show learner acceptance (Al-Harbi et al, 2013). Aspects of this model can help address access, lack of space and environmental barriers faced by Saudi schools. The key variables that are vital in this model are centred on teacher characteristics, learning material and design. There is need to ensure the resources developed fit the needs of the student (Eyitayo, 2013). However, for the acceptance of the technology the perceived usefulness of the material by the learner is crucial (Kaur, 2011). In addition, one element of this model is to measure participants' perceptions of ICT, in order to be compatible with one of the study's objectives. Therefore, this model could be useful. In this matter, for instance, Oyaide (2009) emphasizes the importance of investigating teachers’ characteristics (Views, beliefs and attitudes) and the extent to which they are helpful, cooperative, and accommodating to students. In addition, the availability of ICT tools is crucial; to understand which learning contents are designed for consistent and accurate delivery (Bingimlas, 2009). The extent to which students enjoy learning and believe that e-learning will enhance learning outcomes is an additional factor (OECD, 2000). Finally, to what extent students intend to participate in e-learning is also important. However, a proper strategy, planning and an implementation framework needs to be in place. The ability of learners and instructors are also critical for the success of this model (Lee et al, 2009).
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UTCs: are they delivering for young people and the economy?

UTCs: are they delivering for young people and the economy?

UTCs’ provision of level 3 technical qualifications is often delivered at a higher quality than that of the Further Education colleges that might otherwise be the alternative for many UTC students. With their recruitment age set at 16, UTCs should focus on delivering high-quality existing technical qualifications and eventually T-levels relevant to local and national skill needs. With UTCs offering only Key Stage 5, there would be an opportunity for them to deliver a differentiated, high-quality level 3 technical provision. Academic qualifications, when available, should support core training aims and future progression. Building on their relationships with employers and universities, provision should be further connected to the level 4+ provision in Institutes of Technology, National Colleges and other providers, in line with the progression pathways described in the Post-16 Skills Plan. Provision should be linked to the needs of local employers, reflected in the UTCs’ specialisms.
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Free school statistics

Free school statistics

2012) framework on existing schools will tend to focus on those that were rated in one of the bottom two categories on their last inspection. Therefore this is not a like-for-like comparison. An alternative is to widen the coverage to include inspection findings from the previous framework. This gives a rate of 20% outstanding across all schools. Again this is not a perfectly like-for-like comparison. At the other end of the spectrum four free schools have been rated as inadequate (5%) compared to just under 3% of all schools. 18 19 Readers should
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Analysis of Distance Learning in Smart Schools in Iran: A Case Study of Tehran’s Smart Schools

Analysis of Distance Learning in Smart Schools in Iran: A Case Study of Tehran’s Smart Schools

Collaborative efforts can provide students with positive and meaningful learning experiences as Jeffs and Banister (2006) noted. Smart school is not limited to the use of ICT in teaching and learning but national curriculum and pedagogy, teachers, school administrative staff, parents and the community that enhance the education of Malaysian students have important role. In the definition of smart schools in Iran, it is also stated: Smart schools in Iran are schools that are developed schools that for the transmission of traditional concepts, information and communication technology tools will be used. These tools include computer programs, specially the use of applications, such as slides (PowerPoint), lexicography and spreadsheets and Internet facilities (Education and Training Organization of Tehran, 2005). In the smart schools, using the Internet, students have access to vast reservoirs of information. For getting answers to their questions, students interact not only with teacher but also with other students. Content is presented electronically and teacher acts as a guide (Nozari & Nozari, 2013).
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Educational Isolation: A challenge for schools in England

Educational Isolation: A challenge for schools in England

• Cultural isolation - high levels of isolation from cultural opportunities, such as museums and theatres, and from cultural diversity in the community. This was considered to create ‘insularity’ in these schools and reduce pupils’ social awareness and aspirations. Disparity in funding was identified as exacerbating cultural isolation, preventing schools from creating opportunities to expand pupils’ cultural experiences. It is important to consider, however, that these challenges may not result in educational isolation if schools have access to the necessary resources for school improvement. Urban inner-city schools can have high levels of socioeconomic disadvantage, but the research shows that they generally have greater access to resources that support school improvement. The key resources for educationally isolated schools that are limited by the challenges of location are:
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National Challenge schools: statistics

National Challenge schools: statistics

Ofsted bases its inspection judgements on a range of evidence including the school’s self evaluation plan, views of pupils and parents, what the inspectors see in the classroom and detailed performance data. Schools are graded as either outstanding, good, satisfactory or inadequate. There are two categories of schools ‘causing concern’. Schools are placed in special measures when pupils are not receiving an acceptable standard of education and the school’s management does not demonstrate the capacity to improve the situation. Schools are given a notice to improve when their performance is significantly below expected levels or where pupils are not receiving an acceptable standard of education, but the school’s management demonstrates the capacity to improve the school. 16
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