Top PDF Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: A survey of parents and young people

Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: A survey of parents and young people

Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: A survey of parents and young people

The national survey results show that the EHC assessment and planning process and the resultant plans were working for the majority who received plans in 2015. The positive overall satisfaction rating based on the whole sample was broadly consistent in important subgroups including those in the most deprived areas, ethnic minorities and for those with different types of SEN. There were less positive results for some questions which tended to reflect higher levels of neutral or ‘don’t know’ responses rather than high proportions of negative answers. The views of these ‘neutral or dissatisfied’ families indicate where further progress can be made. For example, when answering an open question about what could have gone better, the most commonly raised points related to duration of process, meeting the child/young person’s needs and staff knowledge and advice.
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Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: A survey of parents and young people

Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: A survey of parents and young people

Specifically, the cognitive testing explored with parents and young people: 4 This focus on whether parents and young people had experienced specific elements set out in the Code of Practice was in part informed by the findings of Skipp and Hopwood (2016). Their qualitative study, Mapping user experiences of the Education, Health and Care process, established that parents tended to score individual components of the process (referral, assessment etc.) differently to how they scored their satisfaction with the process overall. It also found that parents’ overall satisfaction varied according to their degree of understanding of what the process should be like – meaning that parents could express high levels of satisfaction with an experience of the process that did not appear to be in line with the Code.
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Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: a multivariate analysis

Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: a multivariate analysis

Throughout this report, the term ‘respondent’ is used to refer to both the parents/carers and young people who completed the original EHC plan survey. 7 The Chi square tests compared those who had prefer not to say/not applicable/don’t know data (and were therefore removed from the analysis) against those who did not (and were retained for the analysis) against gender, ethnicity, age groups and primary SEN. The tests revealed that there were differences in the number of individuals who had and did not have prefer not to say/not applicable/don’t know data in different ethnic, age and primary SEN groups. That is to say it appeared that some of these groups were more likely than others to have this data and therefore be excluded. The full set of chi square test output can be seen in the Appendix.
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Health experiences of children and young people who migrate – Opportunities for health education

Health experiences of children and young people who migrate – Opportunities for health education

Spencer et al. 1 Abstract Research on migration and health is gaining significant ground, with a focus on the adverse physical and mental health outcomes experienced by migrants. The health-related experiences of children and young people who migrate, however, are relatively absent, with children’s migration and health status often conflated with that of their parents. The omission of children’s own perspectives limits knowledge about how health is understood and experienced by child migrants, including the identification of best ways to support their health. Drawing on the empirical literature on child migrants and health from the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Western Pacific Region, we adopt a critical perspective to examine how the research to date supports a particular way of understanding and investigating the health of children and young people who migrate. Specifically, we highlight how a dominant focus on parents’ migration status, (negative) health outcomes and patterns of risk behaviours limits, rather than aids, the understanding of migrant children’s health. In doing so, we illustrate how much of the evidence base upholds Westernised biomedical notions of health and privileges the use of particular methodologies to assess health outcomes and reduce health risks. These preferences, in turn, shape the subsequent range of ‘appropriate’ forms of health education for, rather than with, children. We conclude by drawing on some exceptions and consider the opportunities these provide for developing health education in line with children’s own understandings of health – crucially underscoring the importance migrant children and young people attach to the more social aspects of their health and migration experiences.
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Starting Secondary School: The Experiences of Adopted Young People and Their Parents

Starting Secondary School: The Experiences of Adopted Young People and Their Parents

involved the distribution of a survey to all adoptive parents in one LA in order to explore their views on their children’s’ education. A section was also included to gather views from the adopted children. The survey aimed to gather both quantitative and qualitative data with the question content designed by EPs in collaboration with the LA Adoption Support Team and the LA Looked-After Children in Education service. This multi-agency commitment to the survey acts as a strength of the research as it is likely that a greater range of topics were addressed through the questions with a mix of both quantitative and qualitative questions used to support one another. Nonetheless, surveys do not allow for the in-depth exploration of views, therefore limiting the insight which can be gathered. In total, survey responses were received from one hundred parents and thirty-three children. This was considered a reasonable response rate by the researchers; however, they do acknowledge that those who chose to participate may have been those experiencing the greatest difficulties with education. This therefore means the findings may not be representative of the general population of adoptive families.
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The needs and experiences of young people from care backgrounds in further education colleges

The needs and experiences of young people from care backgrounds in further education colleges

2.2.7 The role of the EP EPs have statutory duties with regards to providing advice for Education Health and Care Plans (EHCPs) and are heavily involved in work with children and young people identified with SEND (Children and Families Act, 2014; Department for Education, 2015). They possess expert knowledge on child development, the barriers children and young people experience in education and the interventions necessary to support overcoming these. Working within education providers, they can apply their consultation skills to guide teachers, parents and carers towards planning, implementing and reviewing support (Wagner, 2008). However, Osborne et al. (2009, p21) writes, EPs ‘are considered by some to be primarily responsible for SEN rather than possessing a range of skills that could be applied to a number of areas within children’s services departments, including fostering and adoption.’ Jackson & McParlin (2006) also advocate that EPs ‘are well placed to explain to teachers and carers that disturbed behaviour may be a normal reaction to abnormal experiences and suggest the most effective way of dealing with it.’ Nevertheless, there is a dearth of research exploring the role of EPs in working with young people from care backgrounds. Only recently have EPs been mentioned in legal frameworks with regards to looked after children. Recent guidance advises VSHs to work in partnership with professionals such as EPs to promote mental health, well-being and academic achievement (DfE, 2018b).
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A Different kind of normal: parents' experiences of early care and education for young children born prematurely

A Different kind of normal: parents' experiences of early care and education for young children born prematurely

24 Half of all survey parents and the majority of interview parents had attended parent and toddler groups however, many parents did not attend these groups due to health concerns (for them or their child), perceived lack of understanding from other parents about premature birth, the unsuitability of the groups for children born prematurely and/or multiple births or lack of access to such groups in the area. The judgement from other parents or group organisers about children’s development represented a particular barrier that could be addressed with training for organisers of groups. Non-attendance at these groups sometimes had the effect of isolating parents from the communities whose primary purpose is to support them. A small number of parents had found specialist groups near to them which they found useful. However, these specialist groups are not provided for all parents in all locations and early years settings could consider providing the space and time for parents of prematurely born children to meet and share experiences.
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Education, health and care plans: A qualitative investigation into service user experiences of the planning process.

Education, health and care plans: A qualitative investigation into service user experiences of the planning process.

34 Figure 3.2 Case study: Taking responsibility for liaising with specialists 3.3. A need for greater transparency about reasons for delays Although only one in five parents and young people (20%) interviewed in the national survey reported that the process of getting the plan took more than 10 months, many of the parents interviewed in below average-rated local authorities during the qualitative phase reported that the process took this long. A few parents recognised that the length of time taken was partly because they had requested amendments or gone to tribunal over certain elements, and therefore felt that the time taken had had a positive impact on the quality of plan. However, for many parents it was unclear if the local authority was progressing their EHC plan at all during this period. These parents felt that a wait of more than 10 months was unsatisfactory because, during this time, they were acutely aware that their child was without the provision that they needed for their current and future development, and interpreted the delays as a lack of interest or concern for the child’s wellbeing. Most had been made aware of the 20-week timescale by their local authority or school and therefore expected the process to take some time, but they were surprised to find that provision had not been put in place during the same academic year.
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Education, Health and Care plans: A qualitative investigation into service user experiences of the planning process

Education, Health and Care plans: A qualitative investigation into service user experiences of the planning process

34 Figure 3.2 Case study: Taking responsibility for liaising with specialists 3.3. A need for greater transparency about reasons for delays Although only one in five parents and young people (20%) interviewed in the national survey reported that the process of getting the plan took more than 10 months, many of the parents interviewed in below average-rated local authorities during the qualitative phase reported that the process took this long. A few parents recognised that the length of time taken was partly because they had requested amendments or gone to tribunal over certain elements, and therefore felt that the time taken had had a positive impact on the quality of plan. However, for many parents it was unclear if the local authority was progressing their EHC plan at all during this period. These parents felt that a wait of more than 10 months was unsatisfactory because, during this time, they were acutely aware that their child was without the provision that they needed for their current and future development, and interpreted the delays as a lack of interest or concern for the child’s wellbeing. Most had been made aware of the 20-week timescale by their local authority or school and therefore expected the process to take some time, but they were surprised to find that provision had not been put in place during the same academic year.
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The health needs and healthcare experiences of young people trafficked into the UK

The health needs and healthcare experiences of young people trafficked into the UK

a b s t r a c t Young people who have been trafficked may have experienced significant trauma and vio- lence but little is known about their health and healthcare needs. This UK study aimed to address that gap. It included a health survey and qualitative interviews with 29 young peo- ple aged 16–21 trafficked into the UK from other countries who were recruited through voluntary organisations and children’s social services. These data were supplemented by interviews with relevant professionals. Over half the young people had been trafficked for sex work but sexual violence had also been experienced by those trafficked for domes- tic servitude and labour exploitation. Physical violence, threats, restrictions of liberty and deprivation were also widespread, as were experiences of physical and sexual violence prior to being trafficked. Five young women had become pregnant whilst trafficked; three were parents when interviewed. Two-thirds screened positive for high levels of psycho- logical distress, including PTSD. Twelve reported suicidal thinking. Whilst some were keen for opportunities to talk to health professionals confidentially and wanted practitioners to treat their accounts as credible, others wanted to forget abusive experiences. Complex gatekeeping systems, language barriers and practitioners who failed to take them seriously limited access to healthcare. Support and advocacy were helpful in assisting these young people to navigate healthcare systems. Health professionals need to recognise and respond appropriately to trafficked young people’s often complex mental health needs and refer them to relevant services, as well as facilitating care at later times when they might need support or be more ready to receive help.
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The health needs and healthcare experiences of young people trafficked into the UK

The health needs and healthcare experiences of young people trafficked into the UK

a b s t r a c t Young people who have been trafficked may have experienced significant trauma and vio- lence but little is known about their health and healthcare needs. This UK study aimed to address that gap. It included a health survey and qualitative interviews with 29 young peo- ple aged 16–21 trafficked into the UK from other countries who were recruited through voluntary organisations and children’s social services. These data were supplemented by interviews with relevant professionals. Over half the young people had been trafficked for sex work but sexual violence had also been experienced by those trafficked for domes- tic servitude and labour exploitation. Physical violence, threats, restrictions of liberty and deprivation were also widespread, as were experiences of physical and sexual violence prior to being trafficked. Five young women had become pregnant whilst trafficked; three were parents when interviewed. Two-thirds screened positive for high levels of psycho- logical distress, including PTSD. Twelve reported suicidal thinking. Whilst some were keen for opportunities to talk to health professionals confidentially and wanted practitioners to treat their accounts as credible, others wanted to forget abusive experiences. Complex gatekeeping systems, language barriers and practitioners who failed to take them seriously limited access to healthcare. Support and advocacy were helpful in assisting these young people to navigate healthcare systems. Health professionals need to recognise and respond appropriately to trafficked young people’s often complex mental health needs and refer them to relevant services, as well as facilitating care at later times when they might need support or be more ready to receive help.
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The health needs and healthcare experiences of young people trafficked into the UK

The health needs and healthcare experiences of young people trafficked into the UK

a b s t r a c t Young people who have been trafficked may have experienced significant trauma and vio- lence but little is known about their health and healthcare needs. This UK study aimed to address that gap. It included a health survey and qualitative interviews with 29 young peo- ple aged 16–21 trafficked into the UK from other countries who were recruited through voluntary organisations and children’s social services. These data were supplemented by interviews with relevant professionals. Over half the young people had been trafficked for sex work but sexual violence had also been experienced by those trafficked for domes- tic servitude and labour exploitation. Physical violence, threats, restrictions of liberty and deprivation were also widespread, as were experiences of physical and sexual violence prior to being trafficked. Five young women had become pregnant whilst trafficked; three were parents when interviewed. Two-thirds screened positive for high levels of psycho- logical distress, including PTSD. Twelve reported suicidal thinking. Whilst some were keen for opportunities to talk to health professionals confidentially and wanted practitioners to treat their accounts as credible, others wanted to forget abusive experiences. Complex gatekeeping systems, language barriers and practitioners who failed to take them seriously limited access to healthcare. Support and advocacy were helpful in assisting these young people to navigate healthcare systems. Health professionals need to recognise and respond appropriately to trafficked young people’s often complex mental health needs and refer them to relevant services, as well as facilitating care at later times when they might need support or be more ready to receive help.
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Mental health problems in young people with learning disabilities: The perspectives & experiences of parents

Mental health problems in young people with learning disabilities: The perspectives & experiences of parents

Chapter 2 ~ Method Researcher’s Perspective It is good practice in qualitative research for the researcher to state their personal biases that might have an influence on the research (Elliot, Fischer & Rennie, 1999). The idea for this research was influenced by aspects of my clinical work in adult mental health, and then in learning disabilities. As an Assistant Psychologist on a psychiatric intensive care ward, I was struck by the inadequacies of such a unit for those who had learning disabilities as well as an acute mental health problem. Even for those without learning disabilities, the experience of the ward seemed to be one of confusion and bewilderment, but for those with dual diagnosis, the effect appeared to be multiplied due to cognitive, communication and social difficulties. Many of these inpatients were young adults, mostly under the age of 25. Then, whilst completing my placement in learning disabilities, I became aware of some of the challenges that are faced by parents of young people with learning disabilities and mental health problems. I witnessed this both on an individual level, through working with parents of young people, and on a service level, through work with the Transition to Adulthood Social Service team. In trying to understand the experiences of these young people and their families, I was struck by the dearth of research. Systemic models of working, including social constructionist thinking, have been influential in shaping my approach to this work.
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Urgent care out of hours: A comparison of the experiences of older people and parents of young children in a semi rural area

Urgent care out of hours: A comparison of the experiences of older people and parents of young children in a semi rural area

Aim: Older people and parents of young children are the most frequent users of out of hours care. However, their needs and expectations of care may be different. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the experiences and views of these two groups following the transfer of responsibility for out of hours services from General Practi- tioners (GPs) to a Primary Care Trust (PCT). Methods: Qualitative research using semi-structured interviews with 19 informants living in a geographically large, semi- rural PCT area in England served by 15 GP practices. Interviews were taped, tran- scribed and analysed using a thematic framework. Findings: Older people presented with more complex health problems than young children, and expressed more reluctance at calling the service. Both groups experienced similar access problems for using the primary care centre (PCC). Older people reported fewer difficulties obtaining a home visit, though experienced continuity problems when illness episodes lasted longer than one shift. Both groups questioned the ability of a doctor to diagnose accurately using only telephone assessment. Conclusion: Despite differences in presenting symptoms and attitudes to service use, older people and parents with young children experienced similar problems in accessing care at the PCC. Older people more frequently received home visits than parents with young children, and it may be that social context is not sufficiently taken into account when assessing need for a home visit. Practitioners should be aware that older people tend to minimise symptoms and should be cautious of relying on lay interpretations of illness when carrying out telephone assessments with this group.
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Experiences and satisfaction of children, young people and their parents with alternative mental health models to inpatient settings : a systematic review

Experiences and satisfaction of children, young people and their parents with alternative mental health models to inpatient settings : a systematic review

Identified and synthesised interventions in this systematic review showed that most interventions could be applied to urgent and emergency mental health care with CYP. For example, both the Family-based crisis intervention and the SAFETY program are short-term in duration of treatment and such can be successfully delivered both in A&E and out- patient community settings and, therefore, reduce the need for hospitalisation and inpatient admission. Furthermore, these two interventions decrease the carer’s burden, while showing improvement in functioning and increased satisfac- tion by both CYP and their familes. When the whole fam- ily receives support and intervention during a crisis event, there is a visible improvement with levels of satisfaction with service provision, a reduction in both burden and stress in carers, empowerment of family members and improved communication and overall functioning [25, 31, 33, 45].
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Hidden young people in Salford : exploring the experiences of young people not in employment, education or training (NEET) and not claiming benefits

Hidden young people in Salford : exploring the experiences of young people not in employment, education or training (NEET) and not claiming benefits

Recognising the key role of parental influence on many hidden young people, several stakeholders suggested that more should be done to inform parents both about local employment, education and training opportunities, and about the support and services available through Jobcentre Plus and other local support agencies. One suggestion was to produce a guide for parents, which could be sent to the parents of all school leavers. Where parents were relying on young people for care, it was advocated that there should be an initiative to raise awareness among the parents of the impact on their child’s career prospects, and what other support options could be available. Developing trust with parents in local communities was also seen as critical. Supporting local adults to become mentors as part of local youth services was presented as one idea for fostering a higher level of trust.
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Child-friendly health care: the views and experiences of children and young people in Council of Europe member States

Child-friendly health care: the views and experiences of children and young people in Council of Europe member States

Introduction The Council of Europe guidelines on child-friendly health care are designed to provide a framework to ensure that health care systems operate in line with best practice in children’s health care and fulfil commitments under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) and other international standards. At its meeting in December 2010, the Committee of Experts mandated to draft the guidelines agreed to consult children and young people on their opinions and experiences of health care. A literature review on the existing research evidence on children’s rights in health care (completed by the author and submitted to the Group in December 2010) noted that although much research had been undertaken, especially in English-speaking countries, about children’s participation in clinical decision- making, little was known about children’s experience of health care more broadly, including their involvement as service-users. Moreover, the research noted that little was known about children’s experiences of health care in certain parts of the Council of Europe. For this reason, a Council of Europe consultation was planned, chiefly by means of a survey, with a view to recording the views of as wide a group of children as possible. The survey was developed, piloted on a small scale, and made available to the Council of Europe’s national partners in the health care and children’s sectors. The survey was then placed on line at the start of June 2011 where it was available in 14 languages. This report presents the findings of that consultation process.
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Toward Youth Friendly Services: A Survey of Young People in Primary Care

Toward Youth Friendly Services: A Survey of Young People in Primary Care

Our findings confirm results from previous studies indicat- ing that youth consult family doctors mostly for somatic complaints. 4, 12, 13 Only 10% of young people presented with psychological complaints. Despite not presenting for such reasons, a quarter of participants perceived they had a mental illness when asked to evaluate their mental health status. This suggests that a substantial proportion of youth may be aware of their mental health problems, but not of the potential role that a family doctor can play in addressing them. 29–32 Young people also often lack knowledge of what constitutes a treatable mental health problem. 29 Fear of stigma and low awareness of the treatment options are other common barriers to seeking mental health services. 33 Alternatively, young people may not expose their mental health problems to the family doctor because they do not trust the doctor to be competent in helping them with such issues or may be embarrassed to bring up this theme in the consultation. 31, 32, 34 Either negative previous experiences or lack of trust in the current manage- ment options, or both, have been shown to affect young people ’s willingness to seek help for their mental health problems. 33 Table 4. Expectations from the Consultation in 450 Primary Care
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Journeys of resilience? Aimhigher and the experiences of young people looked after and in alternative education

Journeys of resilience? Aimhigher and the experiences of young people looked after and in alternative education

16 Although the study may have had an evaluative feature initially (while Aimhigher was still running), as it progressed, the analysis of the data collected from the nineteen young people and nine professionals guided the exploration, shifting the focus from the impact of Aimhigher interventions as a stand-alone factor to a more holistic view of young people’s experiences of going through life, making transitions through both the education and care system and entering adulthood. This is an important point in understanding the development of the research. Additionally, the rising interest in operationalising the resilience framework with a view to make the services around vulnerable young people more effective makes this study relevant to the practitioners across several fields (Schofield and Beek, 2005). The latter include both state-run and charitable provision set up to support the child, including social work, education, youth work and health services. Therefore, what started as an ambition to position Aimhigher impact within policy-related research with the help of a qualitative method, has ultimately shed light onto very important aspects of young people’s journeys, and how they see themselves on these journeys.
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The Role of Appearance in Adolescents’ Experiences of Neurofibromatosis Type 1: A Survey of Young People and Parents

The Role of Appearance in Adolescents’ Experiences of Neurofibromatosis Type 1: A Survey of Young People and Parents

Little research has directly explored the role of appearance and NF1 during adolescence. Previous exploratory interviews with young people with NF1 (Barke et al. 2014), and parents of young people with the condition (Barke et al. 2016), have identified that thoughts and feelings about appearance, their confidence in managing appearance-related issues and experience of social situations are central to young people’s well-being and experiences of NF1. The role of noticeability appeared to differ between the two groups. Parents reported that visible NF1 had a significant impact on their child's life whereas young people themselves reported that how their appearance might or might not change in the future was more of a concern than was the current noticeability of the condition. In the current study we built on this qualitative work to explore the role of appearance and experience of social situations focusing on the impact of subjective noticeability from the viewpoint of young people with NF1 and parents. Specifically we aimed to explore the following:
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