Top PDF Exploring the relationship between being a parent and the acceptance of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community

Exploring the relationship between being a parent and the acceptance of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community

Exploring the relationship between being a parent and the acceptance of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community

Due to existing homophobic discrimination and stigma, sexual and gender minorities suffer disproportionately from health disparities as compared to their heterosexual peers. Research shows that social determinants of health are strong indicators for health outcomes, specifically citing positive influences from stability in social and family support. Yet lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals risk damaging relationships with their parents when disclosing their sexuality. This study aimed to understand the relationship between parental status and acceptance of the LGBT community. It also assessed whether there was an interaction effect of gender (of an individual – non-parent or parent) with parental status that would affect overall LGBT acceptance. We hypothesized that there was an interaction between gender and parental status and that female parents were the most accepting of the LGBT community as compared with male or female non-parents and male parents. Using data from Acceptance Journeys, a social marketing campaign intended to increase LGBT awareness and decrease LGBT stigma, this study used logistic regressions to model the relationship between parental status and gender on LGBT acceptance. Results showed the odds of acceptance among non- parents to be marginally higher relative to parents (AOR = 1.22; 95% CI = 1.04, 1.41). Females showed more than double the odds of acceptance relative to males (AOR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.91, 2.58). Together, the interaction of parent and gender had a significant effect on LGBT
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Helping Families Support Their Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Children

Helping Families Support Their Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Children

The Family Acceptance Project (FAP) is a community research, intervention, education, and policy initiative started in 2002. FAP studies how family acceptance and rejection affect the health, mental health, and well- being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Results are used to (1) help diverse families decrease rejection and provide support for their LGBT children to decrease their children’s risk and to promote their well-being; (2) strengthen families and help maintain LGBT youth in their homes; and (3) develop a new family-related model of prevention and care for LGBT children and adolescents for use in a wide range of settings. FAP is affiliated with San Francisco State University. The work is carried out with guidance from health and mental health providers, families, youth, and community advocates.
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Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

ENTERTAINMENT: In 1998, Ellen DeGeneres’ show on ABC Family was canceled shortly after she publicly came out as a lesbian. Today she’s a household name and hosts her own nationally syndicated talk show daily. Meanwhile, shows that star LGBT characters, such as “Orange is the New Black,” “Transparent” and “Modern Family” are very popular with viewing audiences. Having grown up during this period of rapid cultural change, today’s children are aware of, and disclose, their LGBT identities in greater numbers and at younger ages. 11 While some of these young people thrive in supportive families, schools and communities, many more are not so fortunate. Our society’s continued failure to fully embrace and affirm LGBT youth is tragically reflected in the number of LGBT teen suicides in the United States. 12 Too often, acceptance lags behind visibility. Even formal legal equality, where it exists, cannot erase entrenched prejudice. As in other civil rights movements, progress is slow to reach the most disempowered and disadvantaged members of the LGBT community, including its youth.
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A Comparison of Attitudes Toward the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Populations

A Comparison of Attitudes Toward the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Populations

Cornelius & Whitaker-Brown, 2015; Maruca, Diaz, Stockmann, & Gonzalez, 2018). Specific to mental health counseling students, the use of role-play may better prepare students to work effectively with individuals exploring their sexual orientation as well as other social systems that might have an impact on those individuals’ lives (Greene et al., 2018; Newman et al., 2002). Across all departments of study, interprofessional education (IPE) enables students to work with one another to improve cultural competencies necessary for caring for vulnerable populations such as the LGBT community. IPE allows students the opportunity to become more aware of their own personal feelings, bias, or attitudes which may influence patient care in professional practice (Papadaki et al., 2015). Several recommended IPE activities include the use of role-play, interviews, case studies, and discussions related to caring for members of the LGBT population.
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The Relationship Between School Type and Mental Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Young Adults

The Relationship Between School Type and Mental Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Young Adults

GSAs differ markedly in function and ability to meet the needs of its members. Some GSAs are nothing more than a supportive counselor, while other GSAs seek to encourage LGBT youth to fight against heteronormative school processes (Currie, Mayberry, & Chenneville, 2012). Other factors may also determine how effective the individual GSA chapter can be. For instance, a school located in a community that embraces gay rights is more likely to be supportive of a GSA chapter than a school located in a less tolerant environment (Watson, Varjas, Meyers, & Graybill, 2010). There are also personality differences amongst GSA chapter advisors; some of these personality differences (e.g. extroverted versus introverted) make some advisors more effective in advocating for LGBT student rights than other GSA advisors (Watson et al., 2010).
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Legal Recognition of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Parents in Texas

Legal Recognition of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Parents in Texas

affirmative steps that LGBT parents can take to protect their legal relationship with their children. First, a person who enters into a different-sex marriage and has children may later divorce after discovering that he or she is lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. This situation is still quite common, and many LGBT people have children as a result of prior different-sex marriages. In such cases, the heterosexual or non-transgender parent may attempt to argue that the court should consider the sexual orientation or gender identity of the LGBT parent as a negative factor in determining custody. To ensure that trial courts do not allow subtle biases or misinformation to affect their resolution of a case, it may be necessary to present both legal arguments and expert testimony, as explained in more detail below.
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Child Custody and Visitation Issues for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Parents in Florida

Child Custody and Visitation Issues for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Parents in Florida

Second, same-sex couples who are raising a child or children together may separate and then become involved in a dispute over custody or visitation. As explained further below, because it is often the case that only one of the partners is a legal parent, the dissolution of a same-sex relationship involving children frequently raises unique legal issues that are not present in most custody disputes between heterosexual parents. Representing an LGBT person who has been functioning as a child’s parent but who is not recognized as a legal parent in a custody or visitation action is extremely challenging. Under current Florida law, there are no clearly established legal protections for such a client, and there are a number of appellate cases in which Florida courts have denied relief to individuals in this circumstance. There are some remaining legal theories that may be successful depending on the facts in a particular case, and it is probable that the law in this area will improve as more courts hear these cases and become more familiar with same-sex parent families. Nonetheless, attorneys representing a non-legal same-sex parent should be aware – and should communicate to their clients – that while current Florida law on non-legal LGBT parents is not entirely settled, most existing precedent is not favorable. Accordingly, practitioners should make every effort to settle the case and to avoid litigation except as a last resort.
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Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Health and Equity in the United States

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Health and Equity in the United States

LGBT individuals also encounter institutional obstacles with respect to relationship formation, parenting issues, immigration status, housing, eligibility for government benefits, taxes, employment, education, and safety (ODPHP, 2019; Knauer, 2012). Institutions have historically discriminated against LGBT people, yet there may be hope as the psychological and psychiatric professional communities has greatly changed their stance on LGBT being a mental health disorder. Hopefully this reversal in discrimination and diagnoses by the psychological community will stand as an example of change to the social, legal, and medical institutions to further eliminate health disparities and marginalization of the LGBT community (Herek, 2010).
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Exploring Cultural and Linguistic Aspects within the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Youth Community

Exploring Cultural and Linguistic Aspects within the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Youth Community

One participant stated, “You have chosen families instead of just the family you’re born into and I feel like that’s a big part of the LGBT community” (Participant 5, Survey Interview, March 2015). Another participant noted “…a lot of queer folks have to make their own family, outside of their biological

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The lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community online: discussions of bullying and self-disclosure in YouTube videos

The lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community online: discussions of bullying and self-disclosure in YouTube videos

There could be any number of reasons as to why a contributor feels the need to, or even wants to, disclose details of their own torment as well as that of others in an online community. A possible reason could be to seek solidarity, support, and engagement from viewers via commenting. Considering the perceived benefits and risks as discussed in previous research (Krasnova et al. 2010), it could be surmised that whilst the disclosures found in the present study are of a very personal nature, contributors could feel that making such statements will help to maintain their relationship within the YouTube community. Furthermore, it could allow the contributor the opportunity to form new friendships with others who have been in a similar situation. Therefore, the benefit and desire for support from another person could be a contributing factor in the decision to disclose such information.
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Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Equalities Initiatives: The Case of UK Local Government

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Equalities Initiatives: The Case of UK Local Government

Substantial progress in sexualities equalities in the UK (at strategic Substantial progress in sexualities equalities in the UK (at strategic level, mainstreaming, different service areas, impact assessments, level, mainstreaming, different service areas, impact assessments, partnerships, community engagement)

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SOCIAL WORKERS\u27 ATTITUDES TOWARDS LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER ADOPTIONS

SOCIAL WORKERS\u27 ATTITUDES TOWARDS LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER ADOPTIONS

Respondents who were neutral stated, “I am neutral on the subject. I think they should adopt through the foster system or from birth parents who specifically request a homosexual couple”, and “I don’t have any beliefs towards this population adopting. I think it’s good that this population is able to adopt” (Respondent 1, personal communication, March 2015; Respondent 20, personal communication, March 2015). In these statements, it does not appear that the respondents had conflicting views of LGBT adoptions, rather they did not agree nor disagree with the progression of these cases. The first response implies that LGBT parents should adopt through public agencies, opposed to private adoption agencies. Additionally, this respondent feels that children should not be placed with LGBT parents, unless the birth parents explicitly ask for their biological children to be placed with a member of the LGBT community. The other neutral respondent feels that LGBT parental adoption is a positive progression, however he or she is still neutral on this matter.
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Barriers to application for judicial appointment research: lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender experiences

Barriers to application for judicial appointment research: lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender experiences

The objective was to generate data from re- spondents who identified themselves as LGBT. To ensure success, details of the sur- vey were circulated via email though existing LGBT legal professional networks, including the InterLaw Diversity Forum, the Bar Lesbi- an and Gay Group (“BLAGG”) and the Lesbi- an and Gay Lawyers Association (“LAGLA”). To widen the pool of LGBT respondents out- side of these groups information was circu- lated to all solicitors by The Law Society via their Professional Update newsletter. The Bar Council also circulated details of the survey through the Council’s Equality and Diversity Committee, via Chambers’ Equal Opportuni- ties Officers.
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Getting To Rights:The Rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Persons In Africa

Getting To Rights:The Rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Persons In Africa

Anglican and other churches are often strictly hierarchical organizations that demand strict discipline and obedience towards superiors. Priests and bishops who step out of line on the issue of homosexuality risk losing their positions and their livelihoods. Bishop Ssenyonjo’s involvement (in the 1990s) with Integrity Uganda, an Anglican group that provided religious counselling to LGBTI persons led Archbishop Orombi to accuse him of doing this for the money and to ban him from preaching. 162 He was reportedly seen by many Ugandans as having been “bought” by westerners in favour of lesbian and gay rights. Bishop Ssenyonjo was reportedly denied a pension despite having served the COU for 50 years. 163 The harsh treatment given to Ssenyonjo and other dissenting clerics may actually mean that the appearance of a unified anti-LGBTI front is more apparent than real. Other sympathetic clergy may be present in the churches, but feel unable to speak out because of the consequences. For programmatic purposes, this means that individual priests would not be able to participate in dialogue processes on this issue without the permission of a bishop. It is thus necessary to open doors at the senior level. Some Anglican groups that do not have a specific LGBTI constituency have nevertheless been supportive. Anglican Bishops of Southern Africa issued a statement condemning the AHB in Uganda. 164 Many of the foremost and most courageous advocates of tolerance in Africa today are religious figures, including prominent ones such as Ugandan Bishop Christopher Ssenyonjo, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, as well as authors and campaigners such as Fr. Kapya Kaoma, who recommends that:
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Motivations to Attend College Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, And Queer Students

Motivations to Attend College Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, And Queer Students

The available research on LGBTQ college students focuses on their development after starting college, particularly in leadership roles. Renn (2007) conducted a study on LGBT  student  leaders  and  found  that  increased  involvement  led  to  increased  “outness,”   which in turn encouraged them to get more involved and obtain leadership roles. She also found that initial motivations for getting involved in student groups were wanting to explore identity, seeking social support, and seeking a voice on campus, to name a few. These motivations for  involvement  could  be  similar  to  LGBTQ  students’  reasons  for  attending   college,  particularly  if  they  have  not  “come  out”  or  disclosed  their  identity.  In 2004, Stevens assessed gay identity development in the college environment. A large component of finding support  networks  in  college  is  disclosure  of  one’s  sexual  identity.  In  this  sample,  first  
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Depression and anxiety in gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex people (GLBTI)

Depression and anxiety in gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex people (GLBTI)

In our society, it is assumed that gender is fixed, so it can be challenging for other people to understand when someone explores different ways of expressing gender, or changes gender altogether. This can make it difficult for transgender people to achieve positive social or legal recognition for their preferred gender. Many people experience confusion and emotional distress as a result of their gender identity, which is not helped by the fact that gender identity issues traditionally have been misrepresented or sensationalised by the media.

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Educational Program to Improve Care for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Patient

Educational Program to Improve Care for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Patient

providers’ bias and sexism aimed at the LGBT individual. For this reason, Kurt Lewin’s Change Theory was applied. This theory has three concepts: driving forces, restraining forces and equilibrium (Lewin, 1935). Driving forces are those elements that move and cause change. Restraining forces hinder change. Equilibrium is the space in between driving and restraining forces (Sarayreh, Khudair & Barakat, 2013). By studying the aforementioned constructs, one can understand the three principles of the change theory: unfreezing, change and freeze. During the “unfreezing” stage, the participants are
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Role Strain Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer Couples Diagnosed with Cancer

Role Strain Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer Couples Diagnosed with Cancer

Martial dissatisfaction depended on the structure of the relationship before the diagnosis with an illness (Badr et al., 2016; Granek et al., 2014). Some couples who reported having marital problems like poor communication continued to have problems after the diagnoses (Badr et al., 2016; Granek et al., 2014). According to Stenberg et al. (2014), the diagnoses of cancer affected a couple less physiologically when they have good communication skills, which allowed them to discuss the needed adjustments to their lifestyle. In a strained relationship, caregivers felt emotional stress affecting how they felt about the partnership (Fagundes, Berg, & Wiebe, 2012; Sautter et al., 2014). Couples with a child diagnosed with cancer who reported being in healthy marriages before the diagnoses stated they experienced problems with poor communication based on lengthy periods of separation causing marriage conflict and struggles with other members of the family (Granek et al., 2014). Studies reported couples with a child battling illness who had previous marital conflict had an increase in divorce (Granek et al., 2014). As couples attempt to share the role of caregiver for their ill child, stress within their relationship occurred as a result of the father’s unsureness when it came to caring for a sick child (Granek et al., 2014).
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The Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Students in Social Work Programs

The Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Students in Social Work Programs

The majority of participants indicated that their educational institution was friendly toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer people (LGBQ; 76.7%). However, when asked about their institution’s friendliness toward transgender people, the proportion of friendly schools was notably lower (34.8%). With regard to institutional nondiscrimination policies, 68.3% of participants reported a policy based on sexual orientation and 37.7% of participants reported a policy based on gender identity. However, in either instance large proportions of participants (30.5% and 53.5%, respectively) did not know whether their schools had such policies in place (see Appendix 2).
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A Global Gaze: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Grantmaking in the Global South and East

A Global Gaze: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Grantmaking in the Global South and East

Other grantmakers have intentionally and strategically supported LGBTI efforts, frontline workers, and leaders in Global South and East, but have not yet been able to be out as LGBTI funders –either due to a well- founded concern for their grantees’ safety on the ground or because they are afraid of disaffecting their own funders. Grantee wellbeing is paramount (see below) and keeping donors engaged is no small thing. These are legitimate concerns at the center of funders’ work. At the same time, if one of the collective and ultimate goals of the LGBTI grantmaking sector is the empowerment of all people, and if other funders can be encouraged by example, it will become increasingly important for funders to find to ways let their support of LGBTI advocates, activists, and cultural workers be known – provided they can do so without endangering the lives, well-being, or efforts of those individuals.
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