Top PDF Extended HOPE Service. Evaluation report, July 2017

Extended HOPE Service. Evaluation report, July 2017

Extended HOPE Service. Evaluation report, July 2017

Regarding the first secondary outcome, young people and parents felt empowered by having someone to talk to and someone who listened to their needs. A small team meant that service users were familiar with Extended HOPE clinicians. In terms of implication and recommendation for this secondary outcome, wider dissemination of information about Extended HOPE would help the innovation to be embedded and to reach a greater number of young people and carers. Funding for this should not present a challenge, since the service has secured funding for at least 2.5 years. However, it would be important to maintain the familiarity that parents and young people feel with Extended HOPE’s staff, even with larger numbers of service users, as this emerged as crucial for young people and parents. Both parents and young people reported high levels of satisfaction with Extended HOPE. Parents appeared to report a more positive experience of the service than young people, which may suggest that Extended HOPE is more appropriate for parents when their child is in crisis. Regarding implications and recommendations for the experience of service, the results of this evaluation suggest that service users experienced Extended HOPE as meeting parents’ needs more fully than young people’s needs.
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Implementation evaluation of Doncaster Children’s Services Trust. Final report, July 2017

Implementation evaluation of Doncaster Children’s Services Trust. Final report, July 2017

Changes to the remit of the Assessment and Child Protection Service (ACPS), both before and following the launch of the Trust, presented challenges to practitioners’ ability to effectively support children. Prior to the Trust going live, the work of the ACPS in the Council was extended so they did the first and only assessment (previously R&R did the initial assessment and ACPS did the core assessment). ACPS practitioners experienced a further change in their responsibilities following the establishment of the Trust. The remit of ACPS practitioners widened further to include taking cases from referral, through assessment to permanence; the latter a role previously undertaken by Children in Care (CIC) social workers. Concern was expressed by social workers and team managers of the need to develop further expertise within the team to undertake this work and lack of communication about planned training for social workers about timescales, administrative procedures and expectations of court work. While their responsibilities and workload had increased, the staffing of the teams within the service had not grown to accommodate this demand and social workers would have preferred a greater amount of consultation prior to changes.
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Cornerstone Adoption Support Programme. Evaluation report, July 2017

Cornerstone Adoption Support Programme. Evaluation report, July 2017

Research evidence on enhancing the agency capacity to deliver adoption support Current adoption policy reform rests on the assumption that adoption support is best secured by targeting funding through the ASF, itself established as an independently managed system for commissioning therapeutic interventions in the individual case, once the adoptive family is formed, and specified support needs have been assessed (see First4adoption, 2016). This approach to adoption support assessment and provision is consistent with the primarily reactive statutory duties and powers for adoption support placed on local authorities. However, it means also that policy and research attention has come to focus on the need to achieve growth in what is now called the ‘adoption support market’, and in ways that are not simply piecemeal (Lewis and Ghate, 2015). Lewis and Ghate (2015) provide a reminder that service innovation must be evaluated by reference, not only to the intrinsic merits of its therapeutic elements, as evidenced by their impact at the case level, but also for its impact on the service system as a whole. However, the systemic impact of the Cornerstone programme cannot be addressed by reference to research relevant to the dominant model of the adoption support market embodied in current policy.
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Creating Strong Communities in North East Lincolnshire. Evaluation report, July 2017

Creating Strong Communities in North East Lincolnshire. Evaluation report, July 2017

Restorative Practice has made a significant mark on operational practice areas across the authority with three-quarters (74%) of staff responding to the survey (total responses, 59) trained indicating that it has changed the way they manage staff and 88% indicating that they are actively using it to implement change. The Restorative Schools Programme involved the introduction of Restorative Practice to primary and secondary staff and pupils in North East Lincolnshire at six schools. During the initial period of evaluation, five schools completed surveys. During the extended evaluation period, two school were selected as case study sites, and one of these schools completed further surveys. The case studies show positive outcomes, with both schools reporting improved pupil behaviour and communication as a result of the implementation of Restorative Practice among teaching staff.
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Leeds Family Valued. Evaluation report, July 2017

Leeds Family Valued. Evaluation report, July 2017

particularly helpful feature of the new structure. It is a two-way process. For instance, the probation service provide information about anyone they are currently dealing with but also take information from the meeting that can be used for preparing pre-sentence reports. They also alert the meeting to cases where bail conditions have been violated or restraining orders have been breached so that offenders can be recalled into custody. Observations of daily meetings and research interviews confirmed that often a great deal is known by different agencies about abusive men’s histories of offending and addictions (for instance, by housing), and their likely willingness to engage with services. These integrated multi-agency discussions and practices are able to focus on offenders in a rigorous (and innovative) way. They seek to ensure there is proactive engagement with the perpetrator; that they are held to account and that women and child victims are kept safe:
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The Islington ‘Doing what counts : measuring what matters’. Evaluation report, July 2017

The Islington ‘Doing what counts : measuring what matters’. Evaluation report, July 2017

• to avoid conflict, where competing perspectives about case direction might arise: ‘I think it would be difficult if it was somebody who was actually involved in a case and giving you direction and had their own thoughts and views on that case, I think it'd be more difficult for them to be objective about your approach’ (Social Worker) However, separation might be expected also to reinforce, not reduce, the split in the agency between the dual role of managerial oversight of practitioner achievement of service standards, and professional accountability for practice quality enhancement. The alternative view is that accountability in the statutory social work role is inclusive of both aspects at the same time. Moreover, these requirements include performance measured by reference to standard legal rules, as well as bespoke definitions of practice quality. For example, consultation with children is a statutory obligation, and not simply an aspect of the MSW practice model, and is required to be addressed within the performance management process. By keeping the 2 approaches to performance measurement separate,and focusing only on MSW practice evaluation, the project was distracted from the need to simultaneously enhance LPIR capacity to track child safety and permanence outcomes .
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Specialist Health and Resilient Environment (SHARE) Service. Evaluation report, July 2017

Specialist Health and Resilient Environment (SHARE) Service. Evaluation report, July 2017

much needed gap. On the other hand, the novelty of the service means that processes and procedures had to be developed from scratch, with lessons learnt and implemented along the way. Still, freedom to have this flexibility meant that challenges could be efficiently and effectively addressed. Likewise, transparency and clarity of aims were crucial in maintaining boundaries to this flexibility. Nonetheless, developing new processes was described by some as being unwieldy in the first instance, as they required refinement over time. Examples included referral processes, crisis management, and location and facilities.
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Compass Service. Evaluation report, July 2017

Compass Service. Evaluation report, July 2017

parents. It will be crucial to maintain the level of care with larger numbers of service users. Dissemination would also mean that more young people and families would access Compass, and hence more resources would be needed in order to cope with future staffing and demand. Parents noted this and described a need for the service to expand, as the demand for the service is growing while the capacity has remained the same. Currently, the VRS has been jointly commissioned by NCC and the 5 Norfolk CCGs for the next 5 years, in which they are required to submit data on the pupils’ outcomes to ensure satisfactory performance against their Key Performance Indicators. Compass team has no reason to believe that this arrangement will not continue after that time. On the other hand, COS’ funding agreed with NCC is on a recurrent budget basis, which has led to contract negotiations between NCC and NSFT. The terms of the contract are being widened to include the LAC of the CAMHS service for Norfolk and Waveney as well as the Perinatal, Infant Mental Health Attachment Team (which was initially funded by the Department of Communities and Local Government and is now operationally managed within the wider Compass Service).
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Transparency and Oversight of the Council’s Budget: Council executive powers  CEPS Research Report No  2017/11, July 2017

Transparency and Oversight of the Council’s Budget: Council executive powers CEPS Research Report No 2017/11, July 2017

Table 1 illustrates a series of unanswered and often repeated questions posed by the Parliament. For the 2009 discharge, during the transition to the European External Action Service (EEAS), there was a series of questions on focused cost. The financing of EU Special Representatives had for years been contentious as the ECA had itself noted: “The question of defining administrative expenses compared to operational expenses has not been resolved. Although a budgetary line has been introduced since 1998…to cover preparatory expenses (previously considered as administrative), the Council decided that the expenses linked to the Special Representatives of the EU (EUSR) had to be from here on considered as administrative and, to that end, financed through the budget of the Council’s Secretariat-General” (Cour des Comptes, 2001: 6).
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Volume 05 Issue 07 (2017) July 2017

Volume 05 Issue 07 (2017) July 2017

proportion of US shale oil production from Nigeria in US crude oil import will lead to a 367.7% increase in Nigerian crude oil export. Conclusions and Recommendations The relationship between shale oil production in US and the Nigerian crude oil export is positive based on our findings. This result is contrary to other authors, news report and other evidences which state that the development of shale oil in the United States is surely a danger to the Nigerian economy. Based on our findings, an increase in the production of shale oil will invariable lead to an increase in Nigerian crude oil export. This can only be true if the prices of crude oil are more attractive to other refiners by reducing production costs resulting in a decrease in oil price.
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Report on the Evaluation-as-a-Service (EaaS) Expert Workshop

Report on the Evaluation-as-a-Service (EaaS) Expert Workshop

The FP7 project VISCERAL 6 is organizing a series of benchmarks on the processing of large- scale 3D radiology images [9]. The tasks include the segmentation of images, the detection of lesions in the images and the retrieval of similar cases including images and semantic terms as queries. VISCERAL is making use of an innovative cloud-based evaluation approach where all data are stored in the cloud. Participants in the tasks get virtual machines (VMs) to install their software and access to training data via the cloud. For the test phase the virtual machines are blocked for the participants and the organizers take over the VMs and run the executables in a defined format connecting the VM to a different storage with the test data. The idea is to bring the algorithms to the data instead of bringing the data to the algorithms [6]. The approach has several advantages as it first avoids sending hard disks with large amounts of data and allows working on confidential data as participants only get to see the training data set. In terms of science the availability of the data set and a working executable allows reproducibility of the approaches. The executables are also used in collaboration with the participants to run the algorithms on more non-annotated data sets with a goal to use label fusion and create more ground truth by fusing the output of all participant approaches. The ground truth created in this way is called the silver corpus, as opposed to the gold corpus that is created through manual annotation of the images by radiologists.
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Evaluation of the Citizens Signpost Service. Final report

Evaluation of the Citizens Signpost Service. Final report

Added-value: the Citizens Signpost Service can be considered to add value to services that are available at the national level given that there is no equivalent service available at the Member State level. Furthermore, crucially, most EU Member States do not offer Citizens Advice Bureaux services to their citizens. The exceptions are the UK, Ireland, Poland, Lithuania and the Czech Republic. Whilst some other countries may have websites that provide information that could be useful help citizens to deal with national administrative requirements, they are often not targeted to suit the needs of foreign nationals, and whilst some provide an e-mail helpdesk, generally the sites do not provide a telephone helpline. Thus, it can be considered that in the majority of cases there is no structured advice provision that reflects the scope of service provided by CSS. It is, however, important to take into account that the services interviewed reported that they are able to answer cross border questions, which raises questions as to the current added-value of CSS to these services. However, these services did report that they believed that CSS could add value if there was greater awareness of what CSS could do. Those responsible for CSS could consider similar promotional exercises as those carried out by SOLVIT, whereby Commission representatives went to national CABs and gave presentations on the Service, this not only generated a level of awareness it also led to links being established on their web sites. Several of the CABs suggested that CSS could help by discussing how to link in with their national services. Ideas include:
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Citizens' Signpost Service. Progress report — July 2003 to June 2004

Citizens' Signpost Service. Progress report — July 2003 to June 2004

Progress report — July 2003 to June 2 0 0 4 Directorate General for the Internal Market, Unit A 4 Internal and external communication Introduction The new version of the Citizens' Signpost Service (CS[.]

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Vol 7 No 3 (2017): July-September 2017

Vol 7 No 3 (2017): July-September 2017

Effect of different incubation temperatures on α - amylase production (U/ml) by Aspergillus flavus isolated from water habitats in Saudi Arabia using mandarin peel wastes as submerged[r]

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Volume 05 Issue 07 (2017) July 2017

Volume 05 Issue 07 (2017) July 2017

Other proposes a typology of modality that reflects the different layers of the clause structure in the functional grammar tradition. That is, modal elements can be seen as modifiers (also called operators) at different layers of the clause (predication, event or proposition). Two classifying parameters: the target of evaluation and the domain of evaluation. The target of evaluation is crucially the part that represents these different layers of modification in the clause. It is thus constituted of three different parts:
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A Program Evaluation of the Hope House

A Program Evaluation of the Hope House

interviewed (83.3%). These staff presented as having great care, respect, and empathy for the women residents they served. Further, these staff exhibited a desire to support and empower them. This theme was evident many times throughout the staff members’ interviews and helped to give perspective into how the staff viewed their role in working at the Hope House. One staff member explained that she enjoys supporting the women by giving them life experience. Multiple women reported they try to foster empathy for each woman resident they meet with, stating “if I was in their situation I would want advice too”, the importance to “just really put yourself in their shoes to have a better understanding of what they’re facing,” and “you just have to meet them where they’re at.” Another staff member explained that she will “build a trust with them, where you they can talk about the things that they haven’t been able to process …. and encourage them to learn to make informed choices about the path they want to take.” Multiple women mentioned being willing to advocate for the residents for what they need in the
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Evaluation of Growing Futures : Research Report. March 2017.

Evaluation of Growing Futures : Research Report. March 2017.

Whole family working is a hallmark of the Growing Futures approach. Whole family working is in antithesis to practices described by Hester (2011) in her Three Planet model. Whole family working involves services working with all members of a family in a holistic, joined-up way toward common goals. It attempts to manage potential tensions between the individual priorities of professionals from different services as well as different family members. Whole family working was evident in a number of ways in which DANs work. DANs engage with families on a voluntary basis, on the understanding that families want to change. The need to ‘meet families where they are at’ rather than starting with expectations of where they ‘should be’ was repeatedly emphasised in interviews with Growing Futures’ professionals and DANs in particular. All Growing Futures’ professionals and Board members were unanimous in their view that whole family therapeutic working represents the best hope of tackling DVA.
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Tacis Interim Evaluation  Synthesis Report  July 1997

Tacis Interim Evaluation Synthesis Report July 1997

POs participating in the workshops during this evaluation have indicated a number of areas where they see scope for further improvements in Tacis Programme transparency. The project formulation process is not very transparent to the POs. In the past, they were often consulted mainly with respect to the first drafts of the TOR. Although formally they expressed their agreement by signing the Statement of Endorsement, they felt that their views were not sufficiently reflected. The POs have little insight into the budget of the contractor, which complicates their ability to play the role of equal partners in the management of the project. During implementation, the feedback from the Commission about programme issues raised in progress reports is considered satisfactory but slow. Reasons given for decisions about requests for project extensions are not always well communicated or produced in a timely manner. Such delays and misunderstandings have been known to cause confusion and controversy in the final stages of projects.
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TBAP Residence evaluation. Interim research report. March 2017

TBAP Residence evaluation. Interim research report. March 2017

This interim report is an extension of the initial evaluation (which ended in March 2016), and this extension will continue until August 2017. The extension has permitted further fieldwork visits which will support a greater understanding of how the intervention has evolved over time and any medium-term outcomes for learners that may be emerging. Further attempts will be made to interview former Residence learners in the remaining 7 months of the extended evaluation. The extension will increase the sample sizes of treatment and comparison learners for any quantitative work completed, which will likely increase the representativeness and validity of this strand of work. It is also intended to undertake cost-effectiveness case studies to allow a longer-term assessment of
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Evaluation of the Pupil Deprivation Grant. Final report, December 2017

Evaluation of the Pupil Deprivation Grant. Final report, December 2017

2.8 Ceir mentrau tebyg sy'n gysylltiedig â llwyddiant: er enghraifft, dangosodd adroddiad Ofsted ar y Premiwm Disgybl yn Lloegr fod cyflwyno'r Premiwm Disgybl wedi cyd-fynd â gwelliannau[r]

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