Top PDF Fatigue behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete – a Review

Fatigue behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete – a Review

Fatigue behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete – a Review

Lee et al. (2004) investigated the fatigue behavior of plain and Fibre reinforced concrete. The tension, compression and bending tests were used to different loading arrangements. The loading pattern was applied on cyclic loading. The mechanism of fatigue failure of concrete was to be three distinct stages. The test results showed that the first stage involves the weak regions with in the concrete and Second stage is characterized by slow and progressive growth of the inherent flaws and the Final stage involved with a sufficient number of unstable cracks has formed and also fibres can benefit the fatigue performance of concrete. Common applications for FRC include paving applications such as in airports, highways, bridge decks & industrial floors.
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Flexural Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Tunnel Linings

Flexural Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Tunnel Linings

A review of previous studies revealed that a uniaxial line load causing flexure represents one of the most critical loading cases for tunnel linings (Mashimo et al., 2002) and proved to be a feasible method for evaluating the flexural response of full-scale tunnel lining segments. An experimental loading system was developed, comprising of a loading frame, two roller floor supports and a hydraulic actuator supported by two steel columns. The experimental method was used to study the load-displacement, load-strain, and crack propagation behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete tunnel liner segments subjected to uniaxial flexure loading conditions. Complementary standardized compressive and tensile cylinder and flexure beam tests were also performed to deduce the SFRC material properties in an attempt to replicate the segmented flexure tests with numerical methods. Additionally, computed tomography analysis techniques were employed to analyse and estimate the density fraction and fibre orientation of fibres in cored SFRC specimens. MicroView (3D image viewer software) was used in the visualization and analysis of the scanned cores, which used grey scale histogram profiles to capture the percentage of fibres in divided subsection. Finally, ABAQUS finite element models capable of analyzing the non-linear elasto-plastic behaviour of SFRC were investigated.
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Behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete slabs under impact loads

Behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete slabs under impact loads

Recently, various researchers show their interest in improvising properties HPC against impact loads with addition of different fibres. Earlier research shows that addition of fibres acts as crack arrester and also increases the energy absorption capacity of structural members (Sabale Vishal Dhondiram. B. B. Patil, 2012). Strength and Durability Properties of High Performance Concrete incorporating High Reactivity Metakaolin (HRM), with various percentage of HRM and replacement of cement by silica fume, GGBS and Fly Ash to 10% causes a significant increase in the mechanical properties of the HPC. (Prashant Muley, 2015; Kinayekar 2014) The Compressive Strength, flexural strength increases significantly for 1 % carbon fibre content. (Rajagopalan et al., 1995) investigated experimentally under repeated low energy impact loading on concrete beam 100x200x2300mm, M40. Impact head is instrumented with load cell, Accelerometer and LVDT are used to measure the dynamic response of the beam. The beam peak force reduces with increased number of impact blows for a giver energy of impact loading. (Anbuvelan, Yeol Yoo and Trevor D. Hrynyk 2012) the resistance of concrete slabs under impact loading by strengthening by Fiber Reinforced Polymer Sheets, steel fibre, Polypropylene fibre under impact loading shows a significant increase in the impact characteristic with respect to number of blows for first crack and also the ultimate load carrying capacity of the concrete member. The load carrying capacity of the specimen containing only steel fibre was increased by 19 % whereas the capacity increased by 30% in case of specimen containing steel fibre and fiber reinforced plastics. (Xue-Chao Zhu et al., 1996) Drop-Weight Impact Test on U-Shape concrete specimens from a drop height of 400 mm with four different masses
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Structural Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Steel Concrete Composite Walls

Structural Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Steel Concrete Composite Walls

Concrete is a well-known construction material that has high compressive strength and low tensile strength. The behaviour of this material has been studied for better properties and many new forms of this material has been developed and introduced to the industry namely Lightweight concrete, fiber reinforced concrete, Ultra-high performance concrete, Reactive powder concrete. The most common and well researched material is fibre reinforced concrete using different fibers. The concept of using fibers is to enhance the tensile behaviour of the concrete by bridging the cracks and improving the load carrying capacity of the structural members. Concrete properties exist in multiple length scales of nano, micro and macro sizes and the properties of each scale is derived from those of the next smaller scale.
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Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete

Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete

High performance concrete mix was designed to achieve around M80 grade concrete using admixture as per ACI Committee 211.4-08. Several trial mixes were carried out to achieve HPC using high range water reducing agent (HRWR) super plasticizer and silica fume. Water-cement ratio was adjusted to have slump 0f 100 ± 5 mm. The detail of the trial mixes are tabulated in Table 1. HRWR dosage of 1.4% by weight of cement and silica fume dosage of 11% by weight of cement provided a concrete mix with approximately compressive strength 80 MPa, under normal water curing after 28 days without fibre. Straight steel fibre in varying fibre volume fraction corresponding to 3%, 6%, 9%, and 12% of concrete material were used to produce steel fibre reinforced high performance concrete of higher grades using same mix proportion.
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Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete under Flexural Failure

Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete under Flexural Failure

The experimental program consists of casting and testing of 3 beams with steel fibers to compare our results with the steel fiber reinforced concrete. The beams used for tests were SFRC beam of size (700 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm) used hook end steel fibers in the concrete for determining flexural strength of concrete . The fiber reinforced concrete beam contains steel fibers in at the rate of 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% volume fraction of the beams. This experiment requires lots of trail work as I need to find out the maximum strength.
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Flexural Behaviour of Mono Fibre and Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete using Steel and Nylon

Flexural Behaviour of Mono Fibre and Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete using Steel and Nylon

This paper presents an experimental study on the effect of hybrid fibre addition to M40 concrete mix using the steel-nylon hybrid fibre reinforced system. The study is done by comparing the flexural behaviour of reinforced concrete beams without fibres, with steel fibres, with nylon fibres and with hybrid fibre combination of steel and nylon. M40 grade concrete was designed as the control mix. The main variables considered were the volume fraction of crimped steel fibres and nylon fibres. The mechanical properties of the mono fibre reinforced cast specimens were tested at four different volume fractions of fibre content i.e., 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0%. The optimum volume fraction of steel fibre addition was obtained as 1.5% and that of nylon fibre addition was obtained as 1%. Hybrid combinations of 1.5% by volume of steel fibre along with various volume fractions of nylon fibre, such as 0.1%. 0.15%, 0.2%, 0.25% and 0.3%, were cast in order to find the optimum percentage of the hybrid steel-nylon fibre combination. An optimum of hybrid combination of 1.5% steel with 0.2% of nylon was obtained. A total of 12 reinforced concrete beams were cast and tested. After conducting flexural strength test on the beams, the first crack load, deflection pattern, crack development pattern and ultimate load carrying capacity of the beams were studied and compared.
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Behaviour of reinforced concrete beams with kenaf and steel hybrid fibre

Behaviour of reinforced concrete beams with kenaf and steel hybrid fibre

Based on the results presented and discussed, it is evident that the combinations of kenaf fibres and steel fibres have the potential to serve as part of shear reinforcement in reinforced concrete beams. The increase in strength of the reinforced concrete beams was not consistent during the testing as the beams with fibres were not fully dried and hardened. Therefore, the full capability and capacity of the fibre reinforced concrete in increasing the strength consistently with the increase in the fibre content was not observable. However, for the case of three beams with reduce in shear reinforcement, it can be clearly seen that the fibres improved the load carrying capacity of the beam up to 29% and 25% for KFSF-RC beams with V f
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Structural Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete Filled Steel Box Columns

Structural Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete Filled Steel Box Columns

These parameters are: width–to-column wall thickness ratio, B/t; the length-to-column width ratio, L/B; the percentage of steel fibers in concrete, Vf%; and the eccentricity effect. The first parameter, B/t, represents how much does the tube thickness provide lateral support to the concrete core, it has been considered to vary from strong lateral support of B/t equals 20 (compact steel section) to relatively weak lateral support of B/t equals 40 (non-compact steel section). While the second parameter, L/B, shows the effect of the column slenderness ratios to the ultimate capacities of steel fiber reinforced concrete filled steel box columns. In this case, three ratios equal to 8, 15, and 30 are considered for short, medium and long respectively for different B/t ratios. The third parameter concerns with the effect of percentage of steel fiber in concrete, Vf %. The percentage of steel fibers in concrete is taken equal to 0% up to 4%.
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Problems associated with plate bonding methods of strengthening reinforced concrete beams

Problems associated with plate bonding methods of strengthening reinforced concrete beams

Abstract: This paper reviews works on problems associated with plate bonding or plating methods of strengthening reinforced concrete beams. Every structural element should be designed for a particular type of loading. However many civil structural elements, like reinforced concrete beams are often required to be upgradedor strengthened due to increased load requirements. Strengthening is becoming both environmentally and economically more preferable than replacement. Different types of materials and methods such as sprayed concrete, ferrocement, steel plate and fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) are available for strengthening existing reinforced concrete beams. However, plating methods of steel plate and FRP laminate are the most popular methods amongst the other methods. In this paper, strengthening of plating methods by using steel plate and fibre reinforced polymer (FRP), and the methods of applying these materials are reported. The advantages and disadvantages of these materials are also reported. Furthermore the problems associated with this plating methods by using two these two materials (steel and FRP) are briefly discussed in this paper.
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Mechanical performance of steel fibre reinforced rubberised concrete for flexible concrete pavements

Mechanical performance of steel fibre reinforced rubberised concrete for flexible concrete pavements

This work aims to develop materials for flexible concrete pavements as an alternative to asphalt concrete or polymer-bound rubber surfaces and presents a study on steel fibre reinforced rubberised concrete (SFRRuC). The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of steel fibres (manufactured and/or recycled fibres) on the fresh and mechanical properties of rubberised concrete (RuC) comprising waste tyre rubber (WTR). Free shrinkage is also examined. The main parameters investigated through ten different mixes are WTR and fibre contents. The results show that the addition of fibres in RuC mixes with WTR replacement substantially mitigates the loss in flexural strength due to the rubber content (from 50% to 9.6% loss, compared to conventional concrete). The use of fibres in RuC can also enable the development of sufficient flexural strength and enhance strain capacity and post-peak energy absorption behaviour, thus making SFRRuC an ideal alternative construction material for flexible pavements.
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Shear behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete simply supported beams

Shear behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete simply supported beams

As mentioned earlier, an extensive range of calibration studies was carried out at both the material and structural levels at the initial phase of the present investigation. Full details of these calibrations are available elsewhere (Syed Mohsin, 2012). The details of the case study adopted for the present paper were discussed in the preceding Section 3.2. Nevertheless, two further case studies are presented in Figures 3 and 4, which demonstrate the accuracy of the FE model predictions compared to existing experimental data on beams that failed in bending and shear modes, respectively. Figure 3(a) depicts the arrangement of the SFRC simply supported beam tested by Cho and Kim (2003), while the corresponding calibration results are presented in Figure 3(b). The concrete cylinder compressive strength was 25.3 MPa, the yield and ultimate strengths were 400 MPa and 600 MPa, respectively, for both longitudinal and transverse rein- forcement bars used. Steel fibres adopted were hooked-end with 36 mm length and 0.6 mm diameter added at a volume fraction of V f ¼ 1%: Figure 4(a) shows the arrangement of the SFRC beam
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Experimental and Numerical Study on Fracture Behaviour of Steel and Basalt Fibre Reinforced Concrete Beams

Experimental and Numerical Study on Fracture Behaviour of Steel and Basalt Fibre Reinforced Concrete Beams

The cube moulds of required size 100 mm were made in so that the two parts get separated. Cube moulds were provided with a base plate and they were as per IS:10086- 1982. The tamping rod was made of mild steel and its diameter was 16±0.5 mm and was of length 600±2 mm. the rod end was rounded for the ease of tamping. The compression testing machine was used for testing recommended by code. The compression testing machine was capable of applying the uniform load manually or automatically at the specified rate. Results showing compressive strength are shown in table 7.
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Flexural Behaviour of Hybrid Steel Basalt Fibre Reinforced Concrete

Flexural Behaviour of Hybrid Steel Basalt Fibre Reinforced Concrete

steel fibre content increased from 1.5 % to 2%, the toughness index reduced from 2.89 to 2.545. But in case of Basalt fibre reinforced concrete beams, the toughness index increased from 2.155 to 2.517. In case of a hybrid fibre content of 2 %, the toughness index first decreased from 3.913 to 3.55 and then increased to 3.72. The maximum value of toughness index was obtained for the Hybrid fibre reinforced concrete beam at a fibre content of 2% consisting of 60 % steel fibre and 40 % basalt fibre. The reason could be attributed to the increased strength and ductility as a result of hybridizing steel and basalt fibres. Also, both macro and micro cracks of the concrete are arrested ensuring proper toughness.
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Post-cracking tensile behaviour of steel-fibre-reinforced roller-compacted-concrete for FE modelling and design purposes

Post-cracking tensile behaviour of steel-fibre-reinforced roller-compacted-concrete for FE modelling and design purposes

Three different fibre types were used: one RF, and two IF. The recycled fibres from tyres used in this study had diameters in the range of 0.1 to 0.23 mm and a tensile strength of around 2000 MPa. These fibres have irregular shapes and lengths, so their length distribution is determined using optical measurements (8). In this study, 85% of the fibres had length in the range of 10 to 25 mm, and 50% of them in the range of 15–25 mm. Details of sta- tistical length distribution can be found in Jafarifar et al. (14). Ecolanes (11) determined the optimum practical amount of recycled fibres in the range of 50–60  kg per cubic meter of concrete (or around 2–2.5% by mass). However, higher percentage of recycled fibres (4% and 6% by mass) and plain concrete mixes were also examined. For IF, 2% of fibres by mass of concrete is commonly used for suspended slabs. Two types of industrial fibres were examined: twincone (diameter 1mm, length 54 mm) and hooked-end (diameter 1mm, length 50 mm), all with the same nominal tensile strength (1100 MPa).
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A Practical Investigation on the Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete

A Practical Investigation on the Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete

From the graphs it can be observed that with the increase in the percentage of fiber to 1.00%, the split tensile strength has increased by 70.20 % over plain concrete. At 0.5%fiber the split tensile strength has increased by 25.78 % and at 1.50% fibre the split tensile strength has increased by 35.81 %. Hence 1.00% of fibre can be taken as optimum content. Also it can be observed that with 1.50% of addition of fibre the split tensile strength has decreased when compared to that at 1.00% fibre. This phenomenon is due to the balling effect that takes place due to the increase in the fibre volume.
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Flexural Fatigue Strength of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Containing Blends of Limestone Powder and Silica Fume

Flexural Fatigue Strength of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Containing Blends of Limestone Powder and Silica Fume

Abstract— Based upon the statistical distribution of flexural fatigue life data and flexural fatigue strength of the steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) containing blends of limestone powder (LP) and silica fume (SF), the influence of these inserts on the flexural fatigue performance of concretes is probed. Concrete mixes were proportioned to replace 30% cement with these mineral inserts in different trends. The flexural fatigue performance of plain concrete (PC) and SFRC of comparable fibre size, as reported in previous studies is made to compare with the fatigue performance of present mixes to demonstrate the effect of addition of LP and SF as partial replacement of cement. It has been ascertained that distribution of fatigue life of concretes under study can be modeled by two-parameter Weibull distribution. The increased values of shape parameter for concretes containing mineral inserts correspond to its more homogenous micro- structure as compared to control concrete. The pozzolanic and filler effect of SF in the cement improves the bulk matrix and strengthens the interfaces between fibre and cement paste and aggregate and cement paste. The modified pore structure of LP based concretes is attributed to its filler effect. The fatigue life data has also been presented in the form of S-N diagram and the two-million cycles fatigue strength/endurance limit for mixes was estimated.
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A Review on Shear Behaviour and Durability Aspect of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

A Review on Shear Behaviour and Durability Aspect of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

A/c to M.P. karthik(KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering,(2015)Korean Society of Civil Engineers)-The test result first indicated that at low fibre volume fraction, it is possible to obtain material with enhanced strength and improved toughness from hybrid fibres.The better workability of fresh concrete was obtained in the combination of Steel and PP. The best composite properties were obtained from the hybrid containing polypropylene and steel fibres, which had the greatest strength. The interaction between the Steel and the PET fibres is lower than the Steel and PP fibres, because of observing the water and the balling effects were made the quality of concrete as poor. The addition of steel fibres is the mainly working as the strength material, the PP and PET fibres were working as the crack resistor. The experimental results show that increasing the side concrete cover to stirrup leads to wider diagonal crack spacing and partial absence of shear crack opening control at the surface of the elements. Diagonal cracking is mainly noted the main reason causing the difference in crack opening displacements at the same stirrup strain.
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Analysis of the Versatility of Multi-linear Softening Functions Applied to the Simulation of the Fracture Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Cementitious Materials

Analysis of the Versatility of Multi-linear Softening Functions Applied to the Simulation of the Fracture Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Cementitious Materials

The test specimens for the numerical simulations were produced in previous experimental campaigns. Two types of cementitious matrixes were used: one for steel and polyolefin fibres and a mortar for GRC. In the case of steel and polyolefin macro fibres, a self-compacting concrete was designed. The mix proportioning was previously achieved with the objectives of maintaining self-compactability even after adding the fibres but also with moderate cement and admixture contents. The aggregate distribution was designed by the maximum dry density criterion and the paste design required 375 kg/m³ of cement. In addition Sika Viscocrete-5720 admixture with a 1.25% of cement weight of and 200 kg/m³ of limestone powder addition were used. The mix proportioning can be observed in Table 1. The tests were performed in accordance with RILEM TC-187 SOC [34]. According to the standard, a notch of a third of the height of the sample was performed in the centre of the sample and the relation between span and height in the test was set as 3.0. The loading cylinder was placed in the centre of the sample. For every concrete type, three prismatic specimens of dimensions 430 x 100 x 100 mm³ were cast and tested. The simulations were performed with the average curve of each concrete type.
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Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Under Flexural Failure

Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Under Flexural Failure

professional fields of construction, irrigation works and architecture. There are currently 300,000 metric tons of fibers used for concrete reinforcement. Steel fiber remains the most used fiber of all (50% of total tonnage used) followed by polypropylene (20%), glass (5%) and other fibers (25%) (Banthia, 2012). Steel fiber reinforced concrete under compression and Stress-strain curve for steel fiber reinforced concrete in compression was done by Nataraja.C. Dhang, N. and Gupta, A.P. They have proposed an equation to quantify the effect of fiber on compressive strength of concrete in terms of fiber reinforcing parameter. Mechanical properties of high-strength steel fiber reinforced concrete were done by Song P.S. and Hwang S. They have marked brittleness with low tensile strength and strain capacities of high strength concrete can be overcome by addition of steel fibers. Tdyhey investigated an experimental study were steel fibers added at the volume of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0%. The observation indicate that compressive strength of fiber concrete reached a maximum at 1.5%volume fraction, being 15.3% improvement over the HSC. The split tensile and Flexural Strength improved 98.3% and 126.6% at 2.0% volume fraction.
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