Top PDF Federal Law Enforcement Intelligence

Federal Law Enforcement Intelligence

Federal Law Enforcement Intelligence

The El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC) was established in 1974 in response to a Department of Justice study. The study, which detailed drug and border enforcement strategy and programs, proposed the establishment of a southwest border intelligence service center staffed by representatives of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the U.S. Customs Service, and the DEA. The original EPIC staff comprised 17 employees from the three founding agencies. Initially, EPIC focused on the U.S.-Mexico border and its primary interest was drug movement and immigration violations. Today, EPIC still concentrates primarily on drug movement and immigration violations. Because these criminal activities are seldom limited to one geographic area, EPIC's focus has broadened to include all of the United States and the Western Hemisphere where drug and alien movements are directed toward the United States. Staffing at the DEA-led center has increased to more than 300 analysts, agents, and support personnel from 15 federal agencies, the Texas Department of Public Safety, and the Texas Air National Guard. Information-sharing agreements with other federal law enforcement agencies, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and each of the 50 states ensure that EPIC support is available to those who need it. A telephone call, fax, or email from any of these agencies provides the requestor with real-time information from different federal databases, plus EPIC's own internal database.
Show more

36 Read more

The Politics of Policing: Ensuring Stakeholder Collaboration in the Federal Reform of Local Law Enforcement Agencies

The Politics of Policing: Ensuring Stakeholder Collaboration in the Federal Reform of Local Law Enforcement Agencies

DOJ's opposition to the intervention of community members and rank-and-file police officers in the Los Angeles Consent Decree suggests that there may be some hesitancy on the part of the[r]

59 Read more

Addressing the gender gap in federal law enforcement professions: The motivational attraction of women in computing

Addressing the gender gap in federal law enforcement professions: The motivational attraction of women in computing

When the women were asked if they had any mentors throughout their lives who they trusted and encouraged them, 96% of the women responded yes. However, one woman reported that because she had such a large family and many siblings growing up in the home, she essentially became self-sufficient in the areas of learning and education; she had no choice but to rely on herself. The responses were across the board between parental, academic, and co-worker mentors. The most common form of mentoring came from parents, as they were growing up, and families, as they were older. One woman noted that her mother was encouraging, but her father discouraged her and she always wanted to prove him wrong; he was a negative person, but not to her brother; her father always said she wouldn’t like federal law enforcement as a career. Another woman reported that she had significant mentors in her life, but not in the computer field. In fact, she said, “I thought that the computer field, both academically and professionally, were strangely isolated, competitive, and non-helpful, sort of like every man for himself.” In addition, one woman’s supervisor in her previous job was very encouraging in developing her knowledge and perseverance in the computing field. She stated, “I was hired simply to do a data entry project for my supervisor, but my supervisor taught me all about the company and the position in order to train me to eventually become a supervisor – anytime I doubted my abilities, I was encouraged and my supervisor made sure that I realized the extent of my knowledge.” Although one woman’s parents were supportive of her interests, her mother was concerned that federal law enforcement jobs were for men. One woman was supported and encouraged by the woman that hired her during her initial year of college. She said, “She worked with me as a peer and as a mentor; she encouraged me to learn and follow my career path in law and a government agency.”
Show more

64 Read more

Appendix A DRAFT INFORMATION MANAGEMENT PLAN

Appendix A DRAFT INFORMATION MANAGEMENT PLAN

The Australian authorities, through their counterpart mechanisms the National Fraud Desk (NFD) and the Australian Identity Protection Register (AIPR), have identified a significant shortfall in the intelligence process relating to fraudulent identities. Many Commonwealth Government Agencies and financial institutions are regularly experiencing losses caused by the use and creation of fraudulent identities which are generally produced to obtain a financial benefit or gain. Law enforcement agencies then attempt to investigate these offences and are hindered by a lack of coordination of this intelligence between the victim agencies and the jurisdictions.
Show more

14 Read more

Managing the Muddled Mass of Big Data

Managing the Muddled Mass of Big Data

The merger of information in the foreign intelligence and law enforcement context illustrates another method of privacy protection that Big Data renders ineffective. Historically, the law has distinguished between data held by private entities from data held government entities. It has also treated surveillance for law enforcement purposes under an entirely different set of rules than surveillance for foreign intelligence gathering. Big Data has merged all data together.

9 Read more

AN APPROACH TO CRIME DATA ANALYSIS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

AN APPROACH TO CRIME DATA ANALYSIS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

There are a number of factors responsible for the rising of crimes at an alarming rate in India like illiteracy, poverty, unemployment, migration, frustration & corruption. Intelligence agencies search the database manually, which is a tedious task and consume more time. New advanced technologies & tools are used for combating crimes and to identify criminals. This paper reviewed the use of data mining techniques and tools for identifying crime patterns. New methodologies and analytical techniques should be explored to address the fundamental challenges of criminal data, and to leverage big data to facilitate criminal investigations. Big data analytics has the potential to transform the way that law enforcement and security intelligence agencies extract vital knowledge (e.g., criminal networks) from multiple data sources in real- time to support their investigations.
Show more

8 Read more

Illegal Immigration: Employer Sanctions and Related Proposals

Illegal Immigration: Employer Sanctions and Related Proposals

The ineffectiveness of federal immigration law enforcement is shown by the growing number of states that have enacted laws to prevent employment of undocumented aliens. 5 [r]

29 Read more

Recent Decisions on the Right of Federal Law Enforcement Officers to Search without Warrant

Recent Decisions on the Right of Federal Law Enforcement Officers to Search without Warrant

Recent Decisions on the Right of Federal Law Enforcement Officers to Search without Warrant Search of a Fixed Residence On the crucial question of what latitude to allow federal agents i[r]

5 Read more

National Academy of Sciences Needs of the Forensic Sciences Community Committee

National Academy of Sciences Needs of the Forensic Sciences Community Committee

With the increase in mission to provide forensic services to law enforcement and intelligence agencies worldwide, adequate resources are not available to provide the research and dev[r]

31 Read more

Connecting the Dots. Intelligence and Law Enforcement since 9/11

Connecting the Dots. Intelligence and Law Enforcement since 9/11

deal, has an inquiring mind, and puts it to the task of potential problems. Alternatively, a problem may spring into relief as something new emerges. Or, it may come at the request of a consumer who, engaged in practical matters and negotiations, inevitably lacks some piece of information. The second stage is analysis of the problem, not only to discover and discard what is irrelevant, but also to shape the problem so that a solution will be applicable. Third is the collection of data, which may mean requesting it from someone who has it, or may initiate a surveillance operation to obtain the data. The fourth stage is evaluation of data. This, he notes, is complicated when the source of information is overly protected. He gives the pointed example of a French political figure’s speech decrying the misery in a US-protected city in Algeria. In a report the speaker was rated “unreliable” because the evaluator knew the conditions were not that bad, but the real value of the report was that a supposed ally was promulgating “violent adverse criticism” and the issues of trust and trustworthiness this raised. Kent’s fifth stage is the hypothesis. “[W]hat is desired,” he expounds, “is…quantity and quality,” so that there are as many interpretations of the data as possible. Kent contended, as everyone still does today, that too much security and internal rivalries block this from happening because these impede information from reaching the analyst. How alternative hypotheses are created, and what happens to them, is related to another important question: how intelligence supports policy and how policy directs intelligence. Kent noted that there was always the next-to- last stage, “more collecting and more testing of hypotheses” and gives his sixth stage as presentation of the hypothesis, “a new and better approximation to the truth.” 32
Show more

170 Read more

Much Ado About Doing Nothing: DOJ s Latest Memorandum Cracks Open Door to Marijuana Development on Tribal Lands

Much Ado About Doing Nothing: DOJ s Latest Memorandum Cracks Open Door to Marijuana Development on Tribal Lands

Both recreational and medical marijuana are legal under state law. In this final scenario, tribal and state marijuana enterprises are on roughly equal footing. The federal government may still prosecute, but the risk for marijuana enterprises is at its lowest in this scenario. Conversely, tribal market advantage is also at its lowest; state-authorized marijuana would compete with tribal marijuana for all uses. However, marijuana business on tribal land may offer some advantages even in states where marijuana is fully legal. For example, while the federal government can prosecute even state-authorized marijuana enterprises with little or no warning, the federal government has created deferential consultation procedures before taking enforcement action on tribal lands. In addition, tribes have the ability to apply their own system of regulation and taxation on their lands, which may be more favorable to marijuana business than the state regulatory and taxation system.
Show more

5 Read more

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND REGULATORY AGENCY SUPPORT GUIDELINES SUMMARY OF GUIDELINES

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND REGULATORY AGENCY SUPPORT GUIDELINES SUMMARY OF GUIDELINES

APPLICABILITY OF GUIDELINES: These guidelines are intended only to facilitate the timely, orderly receipt and processing of federal, state or local law enforcement, regulatory agency, or court (“Submitting Agency”) issued subpoenas, summons, court orders, civil investigative demands, agency orders, search warrants and production orders (“Legal Demands”) and Exigent Circumstance Requests (as hereinafter defined on page 4 and for which a Legal Demand must be transmitted as soon as circumstances permit after Inteliquent’s response) seeking customer-related information concerning telephone numbers in service with Inteliquent (as hereinafter defined). A valid Legal Demand will cite to appropriate authority, and be entirely complete, legible, and timely served. By transmitting a Legal Demand (via email) or an Exigent Circumstances Request (via Inteliquent’s website) as invited by these guidelines, a Submitting Agency acknowledges the applicability of the same, which establish certain necessary details (page 3) and conditions for Inteliquent’s acceptance and processing. For Legal Demands transmitted inconsistent with specified conditions and detail
Show more

7 Read more

The Belgian approach to tackling violent radicalisation: a practitioners’ perspective  Institute for European Studies Policy Brief Issue 2018/02, November 2018

The Belgian approach to tackling violent radicalisation: a practitioners’ perspective Institute for European Studies Policy Brief Issue 2018/02, November 2018

The plan provides some key working definitions. Radicalisation is explained as “striving to and/or supporting drastic changes in society, which may pose a threat to the democratic system of law (the goal), potentially by using undemocratic methods (the means), which may harm the functioning of the democratic system of laws (the effect)”. More generally, “radicalism is the willingness to accept the ultimate consequences of a certain way of thinking and putting it into practice.” Primarily the plan focuses on mapping various actors involved in CVE and describes the modes of collaboration and coordination among them. More precisely, aiming to improve the interaction among various Belgian actors, such as law enforcement and intelligence services, social and youth workers, municipal administrations, sports clubs and religious communities, the plan describes a mechanism consisting of three pillars: 1) national task force; 2) local task force and 3) local integrated security cells – all built up on efficient data sharing between law enforcement, practitioners and the public sector.
Show more

8 Read more

Shadow Immigration Enforcement and Its Constitutional Dangers

Shadow Immigration Enforcement and Its Constitutional Dangers

Recent years have seen the dramatic rise of shadow immigration enforcement by state and local police, troopers, and sheriffs. These officers’ day-to-day involvement in ascertaining and communicating immigration information to federal authorities has significantly distorted local law enforcement, adding routine racial profiling and hyper- enforcement against Latinos and others perceived to be “foreign.” Despite its pervasiveness, this distortion most often remains unacknowledged and “under the table,” both because immigration arrests and referrals are not part of the explicit enforcement mandate of state and local officers, and because they are so easily masked by pretextual enforcement of traffic and other laws. It is essential that this dynamic be recognized and aggressively addressed, however, because its victims are constitutionally vulnerable and its consequences for communities and for effective law enforcement are severe. The victimization and alienation of some members of our communities prejudice law enforcement effectiveness and the sense of security we should all feel. Activists, advocates, judges, law enforcement administrators, governmental officers, and attorneys at all levels must use all tools at their disposal to defend with resolute loyalty the principle that all persons in our communities are entitled to the equal protection of the law and to fair treatment by those charged with enforcing it.
Show more

57 Read more

Big Brother and His Science Kit: DNA Databases for 21st Century Crime Control

Big Brother and His Science Kit: DNA Databases for 21st Century Crime Control

The "principal purpose of the DNA database is to assist federal, state, or local criminal justice or law enforcement agencies in the investigation or prosecution of sex-related offenses [r]

57 Read more

FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE: WOULD FEDERALIZATION OF GUARDS IMPROVE SECURITY AT CRITICAL FACILITIES? HEARING BEFORE THE

FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE: WOULD FEDERALIZATION OF GUARDS IMPROVE SECURITY AT CRITICAL FACILITIES? HEARING BEFORE THE

When guards were inspected each CG would have to provide evidence of being lawfully present—employed by a security contractor of the Federal Government, possessing of the appropriate law enforcement agency commission (city or State) and certification of firearms qualifications. Inspections also included determinations of the CG’s knowledge of and ability to perform duties according to post orders. These included proper physical condition (asleep/intoxicated?), necessary equipment (weap- on/equipment/keys), and contraband items (reading materials or the presence of a television). GS–083’s were responsible to the command for documenting these find- ings usually on a daily, shift-to-shift basis—24 hours per day, 7 days per week. In general, the private security guards—CG’s—were only used at GSA-owned Federal office buildings and complexes. The in-service staff, both security specialists and Federal Police officers was in marked decline in the years preceding the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. The assumption was that Federal employees and buildings could be protected in the same manner as commercial property with contractors in ‘‘soft’’ uniforms. It was dead wrong then and it is wrong today!
Show more

71 Read more

Steven C. McCraw Director Texas Department of Public Safety March 20, 2014 Combating Human Trafficking in Our Major Cities

Steven C. McCraw Director Texas Department of Public Safety March 20, 2014 Combating Human Trafficking in Our Major Cities

The  State of Texas has  committed  substantial resources  to  assist  our  federal law enforcement  partners  with  its  vital  mission  of  securing  our  border  with  Mexico.  This  effort  is  essential  to  public  safety,  homeland  security  and  combatting  human  trafficking  in  our  major  cities  and  elsewhere.   We will continue  to  proactively  address  significant threats to  the  people  of  Texas  with  our  local  and  federal  partners  rather  than  react  to  them.    In  Texas,  there  is  no  greater  priority  than  protecting  our  children,  so  we  recently  established  the  Texas  Crimes  Against  Children  Center  (TCACC)  in  Austin  within  the  Texas  Ranger  Division  at  DPS  as  part  of  a  multidisciplinary  approach  to  identify  and  rescue  child  victims  of  sex  trafficking  and  sexual  assault  along  our  highways  and  in  our  cities.  The  TCACC  also  provides  information  and  resources  related  to  these  crimes that  result  in  the  incarceration  of  the  vilest  criminals in  our  state who seek to rob the innocence of children – our most precious resource.   
Show more

5 Read more

STATE OF LOUISIANA STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE. Statewide Credentialing/Access Program. All Hazards Access

STATE OF LOUISIANA STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE. Statewide Credentialing/Access Program. All Hazards Access

Federal, State, and local government agencies and law enforcement officials agree to recognize specific identification from critical infrastructure owners and operators, and their contractors, subcontractors and assigns as they seek access into a restricted disaster area. Relying parties (e.g. law enforcement, National Guard) will require constant communications with local and State EOCs so that proper admittance is granted. Once identity and attributes are authenticated, access is granted at the discretion of the relying parties. In furtherance of this access program, Federal, State, and private sector partners all agree to take action in support of this SOP. The following actions are required:
Show more

7 Read more

AUDIT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE S IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INTEGRATED WIRELESS NETWORK

AUDIT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE S IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INTEGRATED WIRELESS NETWORK

project without the originally planned integrated involvement of federal law enforcement from other Departments, including DHS. This report also recognizes the deployment of the Northwest system in Washington and Oregon and the Southern California system, and both systems were also included as a part of our prior 2007 report. With respect to the IWN project’s deployment of the National Capital Region (NCR), the expected operational date was October 2010. However, this system has yet to be fully implemented as of January 2012. In addition, while we agree that DHS participates in the Northwest and Southern California systems, DHS was not involved in the development of the NCR. Instead, DHS involvement with the NCR was strictly after the fact and has been limited to an expression of
Show more

75 Read more

FM 7 15 The Army Universal Task List pdf

FM 7 15 The Army Universal Task List pdf

1-13. PIO uses the intelligence cycle to produce actionable police intelligence products used by MP leaders in tactical and non-tactical environments. Intelligence products include criminal threat assessments based on the PIAP; strategic and operational plans to support local host nation law enforcement in combating crime and/or neutralizing criminal threats to military operations based on trend and pattern analysis; and disseminating police intelligence information to law enforcement entities. Police intelligence products serve to focus police operations, which, in turn contributes to force protection and mission success. PIO provides the developed criminal intelligence product to the MI community for incorporation and fusion, which contributes to the overall intelligence picture. (FM 3-19.1) (USAMPS)
Show more

450 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...