Top PDF Flexural Behaviour of Hybrid Steel Basalt Fibre Reinforced Concrete

Flexural Behaviour of Hybrid Steel Basalt Fibre Reinforced Concrete

Flexural Behaviour of Hybrid Steel Basalt Fibre Reinforced Concrete

Reinforced concrete is increasingly used widely in civil engineering, but the workability, corrosion resistance and crack resistance of concrete have always been the problems difficult to resolve in the engineering industry. Ordinary plain concrete is weak in tension and contains numerous micro-cracks. The micro-cracks begin to propagate in the matrix when load is applied. The addition of randomly spaced discontinuous fibres help in restricting the propagation of the micro-cracks and macro-cracks. Fibres also improve the mechanical properties of plain concrete such as, resistance to impact, resistance to fracture and resistance to dynamic loads. In the present century, hybridization technology has also been an area of interest to researchers. Hybridization is the process of combining fibers with different characteristics, such as, length, diameter, aspect ratio, modulus of elasticity, material type and tensile strength, to produce a composite that derives benefits from
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The mechanical properties of steel polypropylene fibre composites concrete (HyFRCC)

The mechanical properties of steel polypropylene fibre composites concrete (HyFRCC)

Abstract: This paper discusses the experimental results on the mechanical properties of hybrid fibre reinforced composite concrete (HyFRCC) containing different proportions of steel fibre (SF) and polypropylene fibre (PPF). The mechanical properties include compressive strength, tensile strength, and flexural strength. SF is known to enhance the flexural and tensile strengths, and at the same time is able to resist the formation of macro cracking. Meanwhile, PPF contributes to the tensile strain capacity and compressive strength, and also delay the formation of micro cracks. Hooked-end deformed type SF fibre with 60 mm length and fibrillated virgin type PPF fibre with 19 mm length are used in this study.
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Experimental Study On Flexural Behaviour Of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete Member

Experimental Study On Flexural Behaviour Of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete Member

Water is an important ingredient of concrete as it actively participates in the chemical reactions with cement to form the hydration product, calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel. The strength of the cement concrete depends mainly from the binding action of the hydrated cement paste gel. A higher water-cement (w/c) ratio will decrease the strength, durability, water-tightness and other related properties of the concrete. The quantity of water added should be the minimum requirement for chemical reaction of unhydrated cement, as the excess water would end up only in the formation of undesirable voids (capillary pores) in the hardened cement paste of concrete. The strength of cement paste is inversely proportional to the dilution of the paste. Hence, it is essential to use a little paste as possible, consistent with the requirement of workability and chemical combination with cement.
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A Study on the Effect of Fly Ash on Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete A Paul Makesh1, Vellingiri Anusuya 2

A Study on the Effect of Fly Ash on Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete A Paul Makesh1, Vellingiri Anusuya 2

Fuat Ko Ksal et al (2007) experimentally investigated on the mechanical properties of concrete specimens produced by using silica fume and steel fibre. The main objective of this work was to obtain a more ductile high strength concrete produced by using both silica fume and steel fibre. Two types of steel fibre with aspect ratios (fibre length/fibre diameter) of 65 and 80 were used in the experiments and volume fractions of steel fibre were 0.5% and 1%. Additions of silica fume into the concrete were 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% by weight of cement content. Water/cement ratio was 0.38 and the reference slump was 120 ± 20 mm. Slump test for workability, air content and unit weight tests were performed on fresh concretes. Compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength tests were made on hardened concrete specimens. Load–deflection curves and toughness of the specimens were also obtained by flexural test performed according to ASTM C1018 standards. Flexural tests on beam specimens were achieved using a closed loop deflection-controlled testing machine. The use of silica fume increased both the mechanical strength and the modulus of elasticity of concrete. On the other hand, the addition of steel fibre into concrete improves toughness of high strength concrete significantly. As the steel fibre volume fraction increases, the toughness increases, and high values of aspect ratios give higher toughness. The toughness of
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Flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete beams with basalt fibre reinforced polymers

Flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete beams with basalt fibre reinforced polymers

Reinforced Polymer (CFRP), and Aramid Fibre Reinforced Polymer (AFRP), are compared with the modulus of common reinforcing steel as in Figure 1.4, the major differences become apparent. While the stress strain curves vary between the fibres, none of the FRP material has a higher elastic modulus than steel. Table 1.1 shows the comparison of average strength and modulus values for the commonly used fabrics, and this difference in modulus becomes apparent. However, while the initial modulus is less than that of steel, due to the linear stress-strain which these FRP materials experience and the lack of a yield point, these fabrics can reach much higher stresses before failure. This can be a great advantage over steel when rehabilitating and strengthening reinforced concrete beams, if the proper precautions are taken to ensure there is no brittle failure.
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Experimental Investigation on Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Partial Replacement of Cement by Silica Fume and Quartz Powder

Experimental Investigation on Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Partial Replacement of Cement by Silica Fume and Quartz Powder

ABSTRACT:Adding fibres to concrete greatly increases the toughness of the material. The use of fibres also alters the behaviour of the fibre matrix composite after it has cracked, thereby improving its toughness Secondary cementing materials like Reactive Powder can be used to partially replace cement because of pozzolanic nature. Materials like quartz powder best suites to sand due to its physical and chemical properties, fineness etc. Also these materials are known to increase durability, resistance to sulphate attack. Our main aim is study the materials Quartz powder, Silica Fume are best suitable for preparing durability of concrete for M40 Grade. In cement replaced by silica fume and quartz powder with various percentages like 10%, 15% and 20%. And additional strength purpose using crimped steel fibres and banana fibre with various percentages like 0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%. This study investigates mechanical properties like compressive strength, Split tensile strength, flexural strength and Durability properties like Acid attack test, Sulphate attack test and Alkalinity attack test and the comparative study of normal concrete and fibres concrete.
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Analysis of the Versatility of Multi-linear Softening Functions Applied to the Simulation of the Fracture Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Cementitious Materials

Analysis of the Versatility of Multi-linear Softening Functions Applied to the Simulation of the Fracture Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Cementitious Materials

All cementitious materials are based on having cement as their main binding constituent being also responsible of providing some of the most relevant properties such as their compressive strength and modulus of elasticity. These two properties are highly recommended for construction applications, but some other properties conferred by the cementitious matrix are not as beneficial as the two previous ones. For instance, the flexural strength and the tensile strength of the cementitious materials are limited and consequently might be enhanced if possible. This situation appears in concrete which boasts a remarkable compressive strength and a tensile strength that as a rule of the thumb can be estimated in a tenth of such value. Thus, when constructing structural elements that are subjected to bending moments the stresses that appear would crack the material and even fracture it if the tensile strength is surpassed. Obviously, such event would cause an economic impact on society and might also create a situation where physical damage on humans is inflicted. The traditional solution to such situations has been the use of steel bars placed inside the concrete element section forming reinforced concrete. This approach has been used in a wide variety of applications both in civil engineering and architecture. However, in the nineteenth century the possibility of creating a continuous reinforcement in concrete by adding fibres appeared. From that moment onwards the use of fibres became an option to be considered based on the positive effect of the randomly distributed fibres in the mechanical properties of concrete.
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Experimental and Numerical Study on Fracture Behaviour of Steel and Basalt Fibre Reinforced Concrete Beams

Experimental and Numerical Study on Fracture Behaviour of Steel and Basalt Fibre Reinforced Concrete Beams

Modeling of the beam was done for the dimensions similar to that of the specimens cast. Materials used for analysis includes concrete and steel reinforcement bars. Constitutive models for both steel reinforcement and concrete are available in the ABAQUS material library. Beam was modeled as a three dimensional solid continuum element (C2D8R) which can be called as a brick element or hexahedron and was used for analysis of behavior of fibre reinforced concrete. The elements consisted of eight nodes and each node has three degrees of freedom i.e., translations in x, y and z directions. For the modeling of steel reinforcing bars, a two dimensional truss element was used (T3D2) with two nodes. Each node has three degrees of freedom same as that of the beam element. The properties given for steel reinforcing bars include an average value of yield stress of 500 MPa, Young’s Modulus of 210 GPa and Poisson’s ratio of 0.3. The properties of concrete input were Young’s modulus of 2000 MPa for plain concrete and for other beam models this value varied. The compressive strength, tensile strength and Poisson’s ratio varies with each beam model.
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Behaviour of reinforced concrete beams with kenaf and steel hybrid fibre

Behaviour of reinforced concrete beams with kenaf and steel hybrid fibre

Fibre reinforced concrete has been given due attention by researchers over the past few decades (Swamy and Lankard, 1974), (Sharma, 1986), (El-Niema et al., 1991), (Syed Mohsin, 2012). This is essentially due to its capability of enhancing the load carrying capacity and ductility of the concrete structures. It also changes the mode of failure, control cracking propagation as well as increasing energy absorption. Furthermore, recent findings suggest that that fibres also have the potential to serve as part of shear reinforcement in reinforced concrete structures (Syed Mohsin, 2012), (Azimi et al., 2014), (Abbas et al., 2014).
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Flexural response of concrete one way 
		slabs reinforced internally with basalt fibre reinforced polymer 
		reinforcements

Flexural response of concrete one way slabs reinforced internally with basalt fibre reinforced polymer reinforcements

Recently, basalt fibre reinforced polymer (BFRP) reinforcements are viable alternate to conventional steel reinforcements due to their high tensile strength, light-weight and good corrosion resistance. This paper presents the flexural response of concrete one-way slabs reinforced internally with BFRP and conventional reinforcements. A total of six concrete one -way slabs measuring 2000mm in length, 500mm in breadth and 100mm in depth were constructed. All slabs were tested under four -point bending over a clear span of 1800mm up to failure. The slab test results are described with regard to flexural capacity, deflection, crack width, and failure mode. It has shown that the ultimate load carrying capacity of BFRP slabs were greater than the conventional slabs. However, the BFRP slabs produce higher deflection and crack widths compared to conventional slabs.
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Experimental Investigation on Flexural Performance of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

Experimental Investigation on Flexural Performance of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

This research work focuses on the steel-polyester hybrid fibre reinforced system. In this system, steel fibre, which is stronger and stiffer, improves the first crack strength and ultimate strength, while the polyester fibre, which is more flexible and ductile, leads to improved toughness and strain capacity in the post - cracking zone 7-8 . Information

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Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Under Flexural Failure

Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Under Flexural Failure

Abstract: Steel fiber reinforced concrete (S.F.R.C) is distinguished from plain concrete by its ability to absorb large amount of energy and to withstand large deformations prior to failure. The preceding characteristics are referred to as toughness. Flexural toughness can be measured by taking the useful area under the load-deflection curve in flexure. Detailed experimental investigation was carried out to determine flexural toughness and toughness indices of SFRC the variables used in investigation were: reinforcement, steel fiber percentage by volume. The aim of this project is to present the findings of the investigation and equations obtained for predicting the desired flexural toughness and in turn the toughness indices for SFRC. These equations are dependent on the ultimate flexural strength, first crack multiple deflections and concrete specimen size. They are independent of the concrete matrix composition.
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Flexural Behaviour of Mono Fibre and Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete using Steel and Nylon

Flexural Behaviour of Mono Fibre and Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete using Steel and Nylon

This paper presents an experimental study on the effect of hybrid fibre addition to M40 concrete mix using the steel-nylon hybrid fibre reinforced system. The study is done by comparing the flexural behaviour of reinforced concrete beams without fibres, with steel fibres, with nylon fibres and with hybrid fibre combination of steel and nylon. M40 grade concrete was designed as the control mix. The main variables considered were the volume fraction of crimped steel fibres and nylon fibres. The mechanical properties of the mono fibre reinforced cast specimens were tested at four different volume fractions of fibre content i.e., 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0%. The optimum volume fraction of steel fibre addition was obtained as 1.5% and that of nylon fibre addition was obtained as 1%. Hybrid combinations of 1.5% by volume of steel fibre along with various volume fractions of nylon fibre, such as 0.1%. 0.15%, 0.2%, 0.25% and 0.3%, were cast in order to find the optimum percentage of the hybrid steel-nylon fibre combination. An optimum of hybrid combination of 1.5% steel with 0.2% of nylon was obtained. A total of 12 reinforced concrete beams were cast and tested. After conducting flexural strength test on the beams, the first crack load, deflection pattern, crack development pattern and ultimate load carrying capacity of the beams were studied and compared.
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Flexural strength of basalt fibre reinforced recycled aggregate concrete

Flexural strength of basalt fibre reinforced recycled aggregate concrete

being exposed to accelerated conditioning environments. Cory High et al. (2015) investigated the use of basalt fiber bars as flexural reinforcement for concrete members and the use of chopped basalt fibers as an additive to enhance the mechanical properties of concrete. Chaohua Jiang et al. (2014) studied the effects of the volume fraction and length of basalt fiber (BF) on the mechanical properties of FRC. Coupling with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP), the microstructure of BF concrete was also studied. Fathima Irine et al. (2014) investigated the mechanical properties of Basalt fiber concrete and compare the compressive, flexural and splitting tensile strength of basalt fiber reinforced concrete with plain M30 grade concrete. Jon sung Sim et al. (2005) investigated the applicability of the basalt fiber as a strengthening material for structural concrete members through various experimental work for durability, mechanical properties and flexural strengthening. Kunal Singha (2012) presented a short review on basalt fiber. Mehmet Emin Arslan (2016) investigated the fracture behaviour of basalt fiber reinforced concrete (BFRC) and glass fibre reinforced concrete (GFRC). In the experimental study three-point bending tests were carried out on notched beams produced using BFRC and GFRC.Gore Ketan et al. (2013) evaluated the performance of high strength concrete (HSC) containing supplementary cementations materials. Concrete had a good future and is unlikely to get replaced by any other material on account of its ease to produce, infinite variability, uniformity, durability and economy with using of basalt fiber in high strength concrete. Nasir Shafiq et al. (2016) presentenced the flexural test results of 21 fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) beams containing Poly vinyl alchol (PVA) and basalt fibers (1-3% by volume) Fiber reinforced concrete was made of three different binders. Experimental results showed that the addition of PVA fibers significantly improved the post-cracking flexural response compared to that of the basalt fibers. Amuthakkannan et al. (2013) focused on the effect of fibre length and fibre content of basalt fiber on mechanical properties of the fabricated composites. TianyuXie and Togay Ozbakkaloglu (2016) conducted experimental study on the axial compressive behavior of concrete filled FRP tubes (CFFTs), prepared using different amounts of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA).
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Fatigue behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete – a Review

Fatigue behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete – a Review

Samer et al. (2010) investigate the viability of extending beams length using steel fibre reinforced concrete. The experimental was conducted with sixteen large scale welded beams and four control beams under three points loading. Totally thirty six prismatic concrete elements were designed the volume of fraction of steel fibre was 2% and 3%. Two different welded beams were tested. One welding joint at mid span of the beam and two welding joint At third point of the beam. Cyclic loading was applied on all the specimens. Load-deflection curve, failure and cracking behaviour and ultimate flexural capacity of the beams were monitored. Finally the test results suggested that increase in strength and ductility of the welded beam and the behaviour of moment-curvature capacity of the welded beams with curved joints were better than those with the zigzag joints.
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Flexural Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Tunnel Linings

Flexural Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Tunnel Linings

The promotion of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) as a construction material for tunnel linings has prompted a number of researchers to focus on methods of evaluating their flexural strength and stiffness. This thesis presents the results of an experimental and numerical investigation of the flexural behaviour of full-scale steel fibre reinforced concrete tunnel lining segments. A series of a three-point flexure tests were performed to evaluate the maximum load carrying capacity, the load-deformation behaviour and crack propagation characteristics of these segments. The material properties of the steel fibre reinforced concrete were also studied, using both destructive and non-destructive methods. Element compression and tension tests were conducted to characterize the compressive and tensile strength properties of the SFRC. Additionally, computed tomographic scanning was conducted to analyse and estimate the density fraction and fibre orientation of the fibres in SFRC cores. Three-dimensional finite element analyses were conducted to calibrate a concrete damage plasticity constitutive model and provide better understanding of the segment flexural behaviour. The experimental program indicated that the variation in structural performance of the segments was likely due to an inhomogeneity of fibre distribution and orientation. Modifying the numerical model to account for these variations resulted in a more accurate analysis. Furthermore, from the numerical finite element analysis it was found that the non-linear elasto-plastic concrete damage plasticity model in the crack zone of the beam was mesh dependent. Parametric analyses also revealed that the model was particularly sensitive to small changes to the tensile material property input parameters.
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An Experimental Study of Basalt Chopped Fibers Reinforced Concrete with Replacement of GGBS on Compressive, Tensile and Flexural Behaviour

An Experimental Study of Basalt Chopped Fibers Reinforced Concrete with Replacement of GGBS on Compressive, Tensile and Flexural Behaviour

carried out to study the behaviour of basalt fibre reinforced concrete with GGBS replacement of fine aggregates by various percentages as 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% on compressive, flexural and split tensile strength with plain M40 grade concrete. Total 108 No's of specimens are casted for M40 grade concrete (36 cubes, 36 cylinders and 36 prisms). A design mix of M40 is prepared by using the IS 10262:2009. 28 days water curing is adopted for all the testing specimens. From this experimental work, it can be concluded that constant percentage of fibre 1.5% for cubes and cylinders and 2% for prisms the optimum dosage of GGBS for the compressive strength of cubes, split tensile strength and flexural strength is 25%.
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Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete under Flexural Failure

Behaviour of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete under Flexural Failure

Olivito.R.S., 2007, the failure mode is affected by the presence of fibers, while concrete elements usually fails suddenly and break in their middle section, steel fiber reinforced specimen started micro-cracking symmetrically on their side and fiber bridging effect abounded the sudden failure. From that, the steel fibers can improve the tensile strength of the concrete.

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Bearing stregth of basalt fibre reinforced recycled aggregate concrete

Bearing stregth of basalt fibre reinforced recycled aggregate concrete

Concrete is the most important part in structural construction, the aggregate content should be in a form of good strength for structural purposes. Concrete is made up of with combination of aggregate, cement and water in this combination, three- quarter of the mix is governed by aggregate. The aggregate itself is categorized as fine and course aggregate. In recent years certain countries have considered the re-utilisationof construction and demolition waste as a new construction material as being one of the main objectives with respect to sustainable construction activities. In resent the use of Recycled Concrete (RC) aggregate as a coarse aggregate fraction in structural and non-structural concrete is encouraging by the state and central government. In this view the present experimental was planned to use Recycle aggregate(RA) in different proportions in the place of natural aggregate (NA). From the literature it is also noticed that the strengths are varying by using the recycle aggregate in the place of natural aggregate.
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The effect of fibres on the properties of concrete with oil contaminated sand

The effect of fibres on the properties of concrete with oil contaminated sand

Portland cement concrete is relatively strong in compression but weak in tension and tends to be brittle (Domone & Illston (eds.) 2010). Fibres are added to concrete to reinforce the matrix in order to make the material more capable of carrying tensile loads (Holcim Australia 2015). The presence of fibres having adequate tensile strength and being homogeneously distributed within the concrete builds a micro-scaffolding that; 1) controls crack formation due to shrinkage and 2) leads to concrete ductility (Maccaferri 2015). FRC also exhibits greater durability, fatigue life, resistance to impact and gauging compared to conventional reinforced concrete, thus, expanding its application options.
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