Top PDF Focusing on Organizational Change

Focusing on Organizational Change

Focusing on Organizational Change

Once you have collected the data from tops, middles, and frontline workers, it is useful to aggregate that data by the three levels and for the overall organization. If you are graphically minded, it can be helpful to construct a radar chart depicting the eight dimensions of organizational capacity for change by adding up the mean score for the four items in each dimension. Since a minimum score would be 4 across the four items and a maximum score would be 40, your organizational score will be somewhere between these two extremes. As can be seen in , descriptive statistics are provided for each of the eight dimensions for the over 200 strategic business units that have been previously assessed using the instrument in . Notably, Communication Systems is often the lowest evaluated dimension of the eight, and Trustworthy Leadership is typically the highest evaluated dimension. This suggests that improving your communication before, during, and after change initiatives offers the biggest opportunity for improvement. In addition, it is interesting to point out that the coefficient of variation is highest for systems thinking and communication systems , which suggests that strategic business units vary the most on these two dimensions.
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Impact of Change, Culture and Organizational Politics on Organizational Learning

Impact of Change, Culture and Organizational Politics on Organizational Learning

The research article in hand discusses the role and relationship between different organizational factors in context of learning environment of an organization which plays a vital role in development and effectiveness of an organization. Data collected from multiple industries have strong implications for managers. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of organizational change, organizational culture, organizational politics and organizational learning on organization. The study extends the existing research in this area by focusing on the impact of these forces on organization. Our objective is to make our research a useful resource for scholars who want to have well-incorporated reviews of the literature, advancement in research methods, and thoughts about practice which will open new ways of working within organizations to create successful change. To analyze the role of organizational change, organizational culture, and organizational politics on organizational learning, 300 questionnaires were distributed in Manufacturing, Education, Energy, Banking and Telecommunication sector in Pakistan. Two hundred and sixty four completed surveys were received at the response rate of 88%. Pearson’s moment correlation, descriptive statistics and linear regression was applied to determine the role of organizational change, organizational culture, and organizational politics on organizational learning. Results showsignificant impact and strong implications of this study.
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Skill bias, age and organizational change

Skill bias, age and organizational change

The paper begins by using EUKLEMS data to investigate the impact of ICT on demand for various types of workers, including a split by gender, three skill groups and age. We use the specification in O’Mahony, Robinson and Vecchi (2008) in this first analysis and consider results for 9 countries and 11 industry groups. These first results suggest there may be a bias against older male workers and specifically older males with university education arising from ICT. The second part of the paper attempts to delve more into the reasons why this might have occurred, focusing on training and organisational changes. This analysis uses data from the EU Labour Force Survey (EU LFS) on training matched with EUKLEMS data. We consider whether training combined with ICT use affects wage premiums. We then consider if lower training for older workers appears to be driven by reluctance on the part of firms to train these people or reluctance of the workers themselves to undertake training.
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Paradox in Positive Organizational Change

Paradox in Positive Organizational Change

compared to positive phenomena—that is, the bad has stronger effects than the good (Baumeister et al., 2001)—so it is understandable that researchers focus on the strongest factors accounting for the most variance. Negative effects usually dominate heliotropic inclinations, they account for a larger amount of variance in behavior change, and they capture more attention in scholarly analyses. Consequently, a ten- dency toward investigating the negative dominates the organizational change literature. Even more important however is that over time, organizations also tend to empha- size negative phenomena for the same reasons—survival and adaptation are associ- ated with addressing obstacles, dangers, or threats. If greater organizational effects can be created by addressing the negative, it is logical that organizational policies, practices, and processes will, over time, also tend toward focusing on and organizing around negative factors more than positive factors.
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Organizational Culture and Organizational Commitment in Software Product Line Institutionalization: the Perspective of Organizational Change

Organizational Culture and Organizational Commitment in Software Product Line Institutionalization: the Perspective of Organizational Change

comprehend the organizational culture of SPL and the attitudes of software engineers and the relationships of individuals to the right processes as part of psychological engagement results and exchanges with the organization. Way Many organizational behavioral theorists believe that it is essential to be fit between individuals and organizations. One measure of fitness is perceptual and depends on the notion of personal psychological contract [4]. The psychological contract depends on recognition rather than reality are different from other types of contract. Due to the unrecorded nature of the psychological contract, it has some difficulty in their assessments. Psychological contracts extend the concept of loyalty and commitment to the organization, focusing on both employees and employers, and forming the basis for personal-to-organizational fit [4]. Namely, failure of an intermediate manager to perform a psychological contract can negatively affect employee behavior.
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Organizational innovation: verifying a comprehensive model for catalyzing organizational development and change

Organizational innovation: verifying a comprehensive model for catalyzing organizational development and change

as “the broad set of stimuli—exogenous to the focal organization—that shapes the man- agement discourse and thereby influences the priorities and efforts of external change agents as they engage with organizations ” (p 833). The organizational context comprises the “ administrative and social mechanisms that management can manipulate to shape the behavior of actors in the organization…and [that] will have a direct impact (positive or negative) on the ability of internal change agents to pursue the core activities associated with management innovation ” (p 833). Finally, external change agents are either the “ management intellectuals, idea entrepreneurs, independent consultants, academics, and gurus proactive in creating interest in, influencing the development of, and legitimizing the effectiveness and retention of new management practices” (p 832), and internal change agents are, for instance, “employees of the innovating company proactive in creat- ing interest in, experimenting with and validating the management innovation in ques- tion ” (p 832). The model found in Birkinshaw et al. (2008) consists of four steps: motivation, invention, implementation and theorizing, and labeling. Motivation is con- cerned with factors that create the motives for, and thereby, the desirability of, changing the organization. The next step, invention, involves experimentation, including developing a solution, thinking through the consequences of the new idea, linking the idea to empir- ical data, and testing it in practice. Implementation covers all activities that take place after the test but before the new innovation is operational. The last step, theorizing and labeling, aims to build a rationale for adopting the innovation, to name the innovation, and to communicate the rationale and the innovation both internally and externally.
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Discourse of transformation in organizational change management

Discourse of transformation in organizational change management

Abstract. This study examines the discursive construction of ideological change and identity within the practice of organisational control in organisational change management. The focus of the study was to examine how the organisation through its large-scale reengineering process to implement organisational change initiatives appropriated discourse of transformation to effect change among its organisational members. The organisation’s focus is to change mindsets and persuade members to embrace characteristics, traits, attitudes and behaviour that are deemed to be beneficial to the organisation. Discourse of transformation is used as an object of discursive construction of reality in the construction of an ‘ideal’ member identity and ideological change. The theoretical framework for the study is informed by theories of identity and ideology in discourse, theories of power and language as articulated in the field of critical discourse analysis. The data consist of transcripts of ‘Sharing Sessions’ which were transcribed verbatim. The analytical framework for the textual analysis of identity and ideology is developed on a basis of a combination of concepts and methods namely, [1] analysis, intertextual analysis, Antaki and Widdicombe’s principles for analysing identity in talk and [2] modes of identity regulation.
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Breaking Down The Barriers To Organizational Change

Breaking Down The Barriers To Organizational Change

In summary, it is recommended that managers place more attention to 1) rooting the concept of change into an organization’s culture, 2) hiring individuals who embrace the idea of working in a dynamic environment, and 3) adopting a variety of appropriate strategies aimed at breaking down the barriers to organizational change. It is fair to conclude that as a result, the role that managers play will likely become more complex. Bordum (2010) points out that a practical paradox can emerge between the time horizon inscribed in strategic management and the empirical demands to it under the pressures of high frequency change. The bottom line, however, is that based on the significant failure rate of organizational change, it is imperative that managers resort to adopting whatever change strategies work best for their organization. It is apparent that without executing these strategies, the barriers to organizational change may simply be too high.
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EFFECT OF STRATEGIC CHANGE ON ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE

EFFECT OF STRATEGIC CHANGE ON ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE

From Table 5, it was found that 40 out of 79 respondents (51%) were involved in implementing administrative strategic change at KWS while 39 respondents (49%) were involved in implementing technical strategic change. The number of those involved in implementing administrative change almost equals that of technical change, an indication that both technical and administrative changes were implemented in the organization and given equal attention. The survey findings support the study findings by Helfat, Finkelstein, Mitchell, Peteraf, Singh, Teece, and Winter (2009) and Locke and Latham (2002) who noted that both technical and strategic change should be given equal attention as they are both important in improving the performance of an organization. Thus, giving equal attention to the two types of change indicates organizational commitment to implementing strategic change for improved performance.
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EMPLOYEE RESISTANCE TOWARDS ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

EMPLOYEE RESISTANCE TOWARDS ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

In the present global scenario every organization trying to change, it occurs through transition from its current state to some desired future state. Employee resistance to change is a complex issue facing management in the complex and ever-evolving organization of today. The process of change is ubiquitous, and employee resistance has been identified as a critically important contributor to the failure of many well-intend and well-conceived efforts to initiate change within the organization. In order to facilitate a smooth transition from the old to the new, organizations must be competent in effective change management. The process of change management consists of getting of those involved and affected to accept the introduced changes as well as manage any resistance to them. Organizations depend on and must interact with their external environment in order to survive and grow. They get inputs from their environment transform them through various processes and export outputs to the environment. Pressures for change are created both by external and internal forces. There are two types of employee’s attitude towards change. One aspect of employees may have a negative attitude towards organizational change and are more likely to refuse to accept the change. And the other aspect of employees have a positive attitude towards organizational change are more likely to hold up to the change. Managing organizational change is the process of planning and implementing change in organizations in such a way as to minimize employee resistance and cost to the organization, while also maximizing the effectiveness of the change effort. In this paper we would like to emphasis on the factors affecting the employees to resist the organizational change. Even we would like to discuss brief about the people acceptance towards organizational change.
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Studying the effect of Organizational Culture on Employee Attitude towards Organizational Change

Studying the effect of Organizational Culture on Employee Attitude towards Organizational Change

Moreover, it is worth to notify that the necessity of change and innovation is recognized in the present organizations and no manager may ignore change and innovation for long- term periods. Further, organizational development based on employee attitude toward changes is now an essential element and effective factor of employee attitude toward organizational change of organizational culture. Therefore, it is expected that Zabol Medical Science University, which is an educational, health, medical, and rehabilitation servicing centers, provides better performance through exploring the organizational culture and offering proper feedbacks. Furthermore, the information may also be applied to help employees and managers prepared for change opportunities in the present dynamic environment. Like any other similar organizations, Zabol Medical Science University also resists against change. Studying the effect of organizational culture components on employee attitude towards change in Zabol Medical Science University, it is anticipated that effective factors are identified and required measures are adopted to decrease change resistance. Thus, the present research tries to find the answer to the question that how organizational culture influences Zabol Medical Science University employees’ attitude toward organizational change?
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HR’S ROLE IN ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND RENEWAL

HR’S ROLE IN ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND RENEWAL

The environment, within which organizations operate today, is changing very fast. Hence, for survival and growth, the organizations need to adjust as per the change. Resistance to change was quite common in the distant past but now it is a matter of history. Change has become law of nature. The organizations and personnel have become quite used to change. Organizations undergo strategic organizational change and renewal. Change is inevitable in the life of an organization. Organizations that learn and cope with change will thrive and flourish and others which fail to do so will be wiped out. In strategic organizational renewal, HR should be made a “strategic” partner. Today, around the world, firms including GM, Sony, Reliance, Wipro, Procter and Gamble, Toyota, MCI, WorldCom are undergoing organizational change and renewal to become more competitive. HR is more involved in these changes. In this paper we will discuss HR’s role in organizational change and renewal, managing organizational change and development, TQM programs and HR and business process Reengineering.
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Sociotechnical processes of organizational change and continuity

Sociotechnical processes of organizational change and continuity

This research calls for attention to discourse and organizational practices to bridge the gap in understanding of the emergence, change and diffusion of institutions and their role in shaping patterns of technological adoption. This thesis draws on institutional theory, both as a theoretical underpinning of sociotechnical constituencies (Molina, 1990; Molina, 1993; Collinson and Molina, 1995; Molina, 1999) and as a theoretical complement to the sociotechnical study of organizational continuity and change (Avgerou and McGrath, 2007). This literature review has started to examine some of the characteristics of ‘technology’, ‘organization’ and previous studies of technological adoption within organizations. These indicated that a structurational relationship exists between action and structure across different levels and that these were fundamental for examining the nature of continuity and change. The theoretical challenge (addressed in this thesis) is to accommodate this dualism of both technology and organization and allow for the analysis of their interactive combination in generating conditions of organizational continuity and change. First, I examine the reasons why current insititutional theories fail to be able to adopt (and accommodate) such a perspective on the recursive nature of technology and organization.
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Organizational change and the risk of sickness absence: a longitudinal multilevel analysis of organizational unit level change in hospitals

Organizational change and the risk of sickness absence: a longitudinal multilevel analysis of organizational unit level change in hospitals

Organizational change and the Norwegian context As we discussed in the introduction, the relationship between organizational change and sickness absence should be interpreted in the context in which it occurs. Given the rarity of layoffs in Norwegian hospitals [36], combined with a generous social security system, a healthy economic climate and solid employment protection, we may speculate that any adverse health effects of organizational change on the employees would be eased within a Norwegian context. However, our result that sickness absence still rises following certain types of unit- level change, may indicate that such features remain insuf- ficient to eradicate change-related strain among Norwe- gian hospital employees. Furthermore, job insecurity is not necessarily limited to concerns about unemployment but may also involve the perceived loss of valued circum- stances at work. Indeed, studies have revealed that restruc- turing not involving layoffs may also profoundly and adversely influence employee well-being, weaken co- worker relationships, and reduce organizational commit- ment [60, 61], and that it may increase the likelihood of nurses resorting to sickness absence [36].
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Adaptive Collaboration Model for Organizational Change

Adaptive Collaboration Model for Organizational Change

In order to survive and develop effectively in an increasingly dynamic and uncertain environment, an organization should have the capacity for continuous and adaptive changes. Change can only occur through the collaboration of par- ticipants of this process. Collaboration should be adaptive. Adaptability of collaboration is expressed by its adjustment to dynamic organizational changes. Adaptive collaboration (AC) is an organizational capacity needed for coping with adaptive changes. The goal of the developed model is to shape AC, which provides stimulation and facilitation of col- laborative interaction so as to face the challenges of conducting adaptive changes. The suggested DOCA (Determining, Organizing, Creating, Assigning) model includes these components: Determining an infrastructure of AC; Organizing AC; Creating AC groups; Assigning collaborative group members to perform the tasks required to conduct adaptive changes. Determining AC infrastructure consists in building an adaptive organizational structure, and forming dynamic change and task structures. Organizing AC consists in defining the conditions that provide creation of suitable AC groups. Creating AC groups is meant to encourage facilitation of adaptive collaboration. Assigning the group members tasks allows stimulation for collaborative interactions.
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Organizational Change in Business Environment and the Main Barriers during Organizational Changes

Organizational Change in Business Environment and the Main Barriers during Organizational Changes

By the same respect, emergent and complexity approaches have had a number of criticisms in its approaches to prepare businesses for change and the steps necessary. Theorists such as Wheatley (1992) have compared complexity approaches to states where, ‘the laws of cause and effect appear not to apply’, whereby businesses develop into a stage of ‘self-organisation governed by a small group of individuals’ (Burnes 2004; A). The criticisms come from that in order for these approaches to come into effect a business must operate, ‘ on the edge of chaos’ (Brown and Eisenhardt, 1997), where there, businesses either effectively manage change through self management, or, ‘fall over the edge’. A difficulty faced with any change is that during the transition between changes is that any vision or reasoning behind the change may have altered. For example if a business is going through a serious change to keep up with a market leader technologically, or innovatively. A business may struggle to keep its market share and competitiveness, especially in the consumer market. Burnes (2004; A) backs this up by citing Brown and Eisenhardt’s (1997), research into computer says that, ‘that continuous innovation is necessary for survival and that this is brought about by a process that resembles self- organization in nature.’. And therefore if a slowed placed change approach such as Lewin’s three steps is implemented within the wrong market or business environment, a business may fall behind competitively, or it may just be an ineffective approach to change.
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Impact of Employee‘s Willingness on Organizational Change

Impact of Employee‘s Willingness on Organizational Change

While moving from one state into another state the company must be secure enough so that it could mange to reduce the employees’ resistance against the change. The change must be undertaken gradually in a very systematic way so as to minimize the employees’ resistance and make the efforts successful. Organization move towards change with the purpose of increasing their quality of services. The change can be brought about in many aspects such as firms change their opinion and activities to improve the performance. A change can be through the information technology by introducing ways and means for increasing the performance. A change process can also be taken as a problem solving process. When employees’ are involved in the discussions along with top management; they get more motivated to work and eventually leads towards successful implementation of organizational change. This all requires a vast array of skills and knowledge for the successful execution of change process.
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Internalizing Change Capacity in Secondary Schools Through Organizational Change

Internalizing Change Capacity in Secondary Schools Through Organizational Change

In our first three years of data collection, we only documented the existence of cognitive dissonance where the school staffs were challenging the homo- geneous subject departmental str[r]

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Organizational Design and Management Accounting Change

Organizational Design and Management Accounting Change

We emphasize the importance of an additional domain and argue that organi- zational design has implications for changing MAS of a …rm. Organizational de- sign implies a …rm speci…c distribution of incentives, information and decision rights (Zimmerman, 1997). These structural factors are potentially the major cause of or- ganizational resistance to a MAS change. Implementation process factors (e.g., clear objectives, training of users) may play a secondary role. Adequate implementation may alleviate resistance but cannot remove the underlying structural cause (Markus and Pfe¤er, 1983). Recent empirical research provides evidence that is in line with this argument (Anderson and Young, 1999; Gosselin, 1997).
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Organizational Change: Managing the Human Side

Organizational Change: Managing the Human Side

Outsourcing, globalization, automation, downsiz- ing, best practices, re-engineering, repositioning, and other terms all mean change to your work force. No matter how this change is defined, the challenge to the organization is inevitable: balancing the demands and expectations among the stakeholders— including customers, employees, management, and shareholders. Without balance, an organization risks an anxious work force that may yield diminishing productivity. How an organization decides to motivate, communicate, and integrate change into the work force will determine the magnitude of its success.
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