Top PDF Gender differences in students' mathematics game playing

Gender differences in students' mathematics game playing

Gender differences in students' mathematics game playing

The connection between children’s play and the development of mathematical thinking and understanding is not a new phenomenon. Childhood activities including play with water, blocks (Jarrell, 1998), and construction toys such as Lego (Lowrie, 2002), provide opportunities for game-play contexts which stimulate mathematical thinking. Provided these game-play opportunities are “embedded in cultural practices that make sense to the participants” meaningful learning can take place—even if the practices are in simulated forms” (van Oers, 2010). Recent technological advances, particularly in relation to visual and spatial stimuli, have extended the opportunities and possibilities of game playing. Indeed, a range of children’s games that were previously only in a concrete (three- dimensional) form, are now reproduced in digital forms (e.g., puzzles, board games, and sporting activities). To some extent, these activities require different forms of processing and thinking (Gee, 2007). In addition, some digital games go beyond the representational scope of more traditional games, with opportunities for dynamic representations of information increasingly available. These digital-rich contexts present the opportunity for meaningful mathematics engagement both within the confines of the game and beyond— and consequently become a catalyst for meaning making (Lowrie, 2003). As such, ‘new’ technologies, and the patterns of individuals’ social behaviour(s) have an influence on children’s mathematics engagement. This investigation describes primary-aged students engagement in games-based technologies and considers the impact such technologies have on mathematics engagement.
Show more

14 Read more

Investigating gender differences in mathematics and science: Results from the 2011 Trends in Mathematics and Science Survey

Investigating gender differences in mathematics and science: Results from the 2011 Trends in Mathematics and Science Survey

a child’s view of science through attitudes and the provision of science-positive experiences (Bhanot & Jovanovic, 2009; Crowley, Callanan, Tenenbaum, & Allen, 2001; Frome & Eccles, 1998; Jodl, Michael, Malanchuk, Eccles, & Sameroff, 2001; Lynch, 2002). While the present study investigated attitudes and self- efficacy in Grade 8 students, these are also likely shaped by experiences earlier in their education (Halpern, Aronson, et al., 2007; Simpkins et al., 2005). Given that some cultures showed negligible gender differences in science attitudes or even a small female preference, educational interventions and a concerted effort to provide early science learning opportunities may be warranted for those countries where girls report less interest than boys in learning science (Halpern, Aronson, et al., 2007; Shapiro & Williams, 2012). This is particularly important for countries where the general level of science interest is already low. Eccles (2007) noted that interest in science is often related to perceived relevance to future careers, and the compatibility between science and feminine life goals and values. Parents can play a role in encouraging girls to cultivate an interest in science through early science-enrichment activities for their daughters (Newcombe & Frick, 2010), and stressing the relevance of learning science to future occupational aspirations that have an impact on people and communities (Rozek, Hyde, Svoboda, Hulleman, & Harackiewicz, 2014).
Show more

24 Read more

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN TEACHERS' BELIEFS AND PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN'S ACHIEVEMENT IN MATHEMATICS

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN TEACHERS' BELIEFS AND PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN'S ACHIEVEMENT IN MATHEMATICS

primary teachers may pursue different goal orientations in their teaching, and through their instructional practices they signal to students that the point of school work is to learn and progress, or to perform better. several studies provide evidence that students adopt the goal orientation emphasized through teacher’s use of instructional strategies, and the importance of students’ perceptions of the learning environment is underlined. to date, the knowledge about teachers’ beliefs and instructional practices in mathematics at the lowest primary grade levels is limited. in addition, studies focusing on differences in the learning environment created by male and female teachers through their use of teaching strategies are sparse. however, research findings show that female teachers tend to be more student-centred and supportive of students than male teachers. in the present study female teachers report somewhat higher levels of mastery goal structure for students and mastery approaches to instruction, while male teachers report a somewhat higher level of performance approaches to instruction. positive relationships were also found between students’ math performance and female teachers’ mastery orientation, mastery approaches to instruction and teaching efficacy, respectively. these relations are somewhat stronger for girls than for boys. for the male teachers the relationships between the teacher constructs and student math performance are clearly different. the relatively small sample of male teachers constitutes a serious limitation for the interpretation of these findings. the gender differences that were registered may, however, serve as an interesting starting point for further research. in future studies qualitative research methods should be included, and female and male teachers’ interaction with female and male students should be explored more closely.
Show more

12 Read more

Digital Game-Based Learning and the Mathematics Achievement of Gifted Students

Digital Game-Based Learning and the Mathematics Achievement of Gifted Students

learners when utilizing digital game-based learning (DGBL) for supplemental mathematics instruction when compared to gifted learners not utilizing DGBL. This study compared the Student Growth Percentile (SGP) of 105 sixth-grade gifted participants from two public middle schools as measured by the Renaissance Learning STAR Math Test. The participants took a pretest, completed 540 minutes of supplemental mathematics instruction over a nine-week period, and took a posttest. Participants were randomly selected for the treatment group who utilized a variety of DGBL activities, or participants were randomly selected for the control group who utilized traditional, paper-based mathematics activities. Independent-samples t-tests were used to analyze the SGP between the participants utilizing DGBL and participants not utilizing DGBL, males utilizing DGBL and males not utilizing DGBL, and females utilizing DGBL and females not utilizing DGBL. The importance of this study is to provide educators with knowledge about enhanced instructional technology practices above the prescribed curriculum that may facilitate levels of student achievement for gifted students. No statistical differences in the SGP were found between the treatment group and the control group. Recommendations for further research include the use of specific DGBL games to reduce variations in quality from one publisher to the next, the inclusion of participants from diverse geographic regions, ethnicities, and socioeconomic levels, and data collection over a sustained period of time.
Show more

122 Read more

Assessment of Gender Differences in Mathematics Counselling Needs among Secondary School Students in Maara District, Kenya

Assessment of Gender Differences in Mathematics Counselling Needs among Secondary School Students in Maara District, Kenya

Further, majority of the heads of mathematics departments attested to using non technical terms when explaining mathematical concepts to girls. Steinberg (2007) explains that the habit of wrapping mathematical concepts in non technical terms causes girls to perceive themselves as lacking in mathematics ability. Moreover, in the process of teaching girls, teachers set up expectations that girls would have difficulties with assignments by offering help before it is required. This denies the girls the opportunity to explore, discover and solve mathematics problems on their own. Hence, the girls are unable to develop mathematics confidence. Furthermore, the psychological distress that teachers suffer in trying to simplify mathematical concepts with girls may justify why all the heads of mathematics departments preferred teaching boys to girls.
Show more

6 Read more

Gender and Cultural Differences in Game‑Based Learning Experiences

Gender and Cultural Differences in Game‑Based Learning Experiences

The case studies were conducted in a quasi-experimental controlled setting, with classes of bachelor and graduate students from universities in the Netherlands, the United States and Germany. Although a total of 172 students participated in the actual study, we could only use only the data from 169 students for the gender study and 164 students for the cultural differences study, due to incomplete surveys or student refusal to provide data to the study. Among the students considered for the gender study, 95 students were male, and 74 students were female. Among the 164 students considered for the culture study, the nationalities of the students included Dutch (42), Chinese (39), American (37), German (16), Indian (9), Taiwanese (5), Vietnamese (3), Colombian (2), Pakistani (2), Greek (2), South Korean (2), Costa Rican (1), Ecuadorian (1), Finnish (1), French (1), Syrian (1). 41 additional students participated in a pre-test of the experimental sessions. Their results were excluded from the reported data, as they played a pre-final version of the game to support the development of the game itself. 26 students from a Dutch University participated in the YCS3 study. Of the 26 students, 11 were female and 15 were male. The mean age of the participants was 23.3 with a standard deviation of 1.7. The majority of the participants were Dutch (20), followed by three Chinese students, and one each from Belgium, Mexico and Greece. We received the approval of the Institutional Review Board of the University of Maryland and the Human Research Ethics Committee of Delft University of Technology to conduct this research study with students.
Show more

10 Read more

A new perspective on gender differences in student self-perceptions of ability in mathematics

A new perspective on gender differences in student self-perceptions of ability in mathematics

appropriate for determining students’ hoped for and feared possible selves. Although possible selves were originally designed to assess adolescents’ future perceptions, this study’s sample was made up of almost 50% six-graders who ranged in age from 11 to 12 years old. Thus almost half the sample had just entered adolescence. Previous research where gender differences were found for possible selves was with college students who were taking more advance courses in mathematics (Lips, 1995, 2004). Middle school students may not have had enough experience with mathematics to formulate self- perceptions of ability in mathematics, especially for items assessing a future self (e.g., “For me it is possible to get a job that requires math skills”).
Show more

38 Read more

Gender differences in Achievement Goals and Performances in English Language and Mathematics of Senior Secondary Schools students in Borno State, Nigeria

Gender differences in Achievement Goals and Performances in English Language and Mathematics of Senior Secondary Schools students in Borno State, Nigeria

Aremu (1999) reported that boys are better than girls in Mathematics and other science subjects while Ton (2003) found that girls out performed boys in some other school subjects. Gisela (2011) examined the influence of gender on achievement and found that, male and female students tend to perform differently in various subject areas of education. Mathematics, science and reading are traditional subjects that are prone to obvious achievement gender gaps. Male students tend to be more motivated to achieve better in Mathematics and science subjects while female students perform better in readings. Obioye (2002), in a study, reported that sex is a factor in school Mathematics achievement. On the general trend, in Nigeria, Obioye asserts that male learners tend to achieve higher in Mathematics than their female counterparts. Hanna and Kuendiger (1999) reported a pattern of achievement results in Mathematics which indicated that girls were more successful than boys in Belgium, Thailand, Finland, Hungary; but least in France, Nigeria, Israel and the Netherlands. Inomiesa (1994) and Okwo (1991), showed no gender differences in academic achievement in school subjects
Show more

11 Read more

Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning Strategy on Students’ Achievement by Gender Differences in Secondary School Mathematics in Laikipia East District, Kenya

Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning Strategy on Students’ Achievement by Gender Differences in Secondary School Mathematics in Laikipia East District, Kenya

Available literature has not been able to identify a single direction of difference in performance in mathematics between male and female students subject to the inequalities in their physiological structures (Kadiri, 2004). Although most researchers have found boys performing better than girls (Fennema & Sherman, 1978) especially on higher order knowledge, a few others saw girls out-performing boys while some others established no significant difference particularly during early education. A review of some gender based studies that were carried out between 1985 and 1995 by Brandy & Eister (1995) showed that there is a considerable inconsistency in the literature as to the nature, extent and sources of bias in the differential performances between boys and girls in mathematics. They noted that with the inconsistent findings and significant methodological flaws observed, more empirical researches are needed to investigate the existence of gender bias in the classroom. Report of Tyson’s (1996) study on the differential performance of girls on standardized multiple choice mathematics achievement tests, compared to constructed response tests of reasoning and problem solving showed that males performed significantly better than females on the pretest although no significant differences were found on the post-test. The pretest difference was explained as a measure of difference in the pre-requisite knowledge of the two sexes.
Show more

10 Read more

Gender Differences in Statistics Anxiety with Undergraduate College Students

Gender Differences in Statistics Anxiety with Undergraduate College Students

There is a body of research that indicates that there is a relationship between statistics anxiety and attitudes towards statistics with college students. DeVaney (2010) in a study of 27 on- campus (5 male, 22 female) and 93 online graduate students (18 male, 75 female) found that an inverse relationship between statistics and attitudes towards statistics with “…students in the online classes generally had higher levels of anxiety and less favorable attitudes towards statistics” (p. 9). Perepiczka, Chandler, & Becerra (2011) in a study of 166 graduate students (30 male, 136 female) found a negative correlation between statistical anxiety and self-efficacy to learn statistics (r = -.679), a positive correlation between self-efficacy to learn statistics and attitudes towards statistics (r = .708), with statistics anxiety and attitudes towards statistics negatively and significantly correlated (r = -.832). Additionally, statistics anxiety and attitudes towards statistics were statistically significant predictors of self-efficacy to learn statistics. Dempster & McCorry (2009) found that attitudes towards statistics and prior experience of mathematics and statistics were predictors of statistics assessment at an undergraduate level. Mills (2004) found that students who felt confident about being able to master material in an introductory statistics class exhibited very positive attitudes about statistics. Lacasse & Chiocchio (2005) in a study of 68 students (14 male, 54 female) found a negative relationship between statistics anxiety and attitudes towards learning statistics (r = -.41, p < .05). They indicate that “anxiety towards statistics negatively affects performance, interest, and desire to learn statistics in a psychometrics class” (p. 3).
Show more

14 Read more

Gender differences in the self efficacy of secondary school students

Gender differences in the self efficacy of secondary school students

difference in achievement between sexes (t (98) = 0.68, p< 0.1) and also a significant relationship exists between self-efficacy and achievement (r=0.385, at 0.01 level with 98 degree of freedom). Mishra and Shanwal (2014) studied. Role of Family Environment in Developing Self Efficacy of Adolescents The results showed positive association between family environment and self-efficacy. Ansari and Khan (2014) studied Self-Efficacy as a Predictor of Life Satisfaction among Undergraduate Students and findings of the present study showed that Self-efficacy and Life Satisfaction significantly correlated with each other and Self-Efficacy had its significant impact on Life Satisfaction among under-graduate students. Kvedere (2014) studied Mathematics Self-efficacy, Self- concept and Anxiety Among 9 th Grade Students in Latvia and found Boys have more positive mathematical self than girls and students who come from bigger cities and towns have more negative mathematical self than those from rural areas. Sharma and Rani (2014) studied Self Efficacy – A Comparison among University Postgraduates in Demographic Profiles and findings revealed that university postgraduates were not found to differ significantly by age-groups but significant differences were observed among university postgraduates by gender, locality and faculty. Goulão (2014) studied Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Academic Achievement in Adults’ Learners and analysis of the data indicated that students’ level of self-efficacy is high (average=45) and a significant relationship exists between self-efficacy and academic achievement (r=0.286, at 0.05 level). Ahmadi et al. (2014) studied the Relationship of Academic Self-Efficacy and Self- regulation with Academic Performance among the High School Students with School Refusal Behavior and Normal Students. Findings showed that: 1) the relationship between academic self-efficacy and academic performance in two groups was positive and significant; 2) the relationship between self-regulation and academic performance in two groups was positive and significant; 3) the Fisher-Z test showed no significant difference between two groups regarding to the relationships of the variables to academic performance, 4) the multiple correlation coefficient of predictor variables with academic performance was significant; 5) self-regulation was found as a good predictor of academic performance in two groups. Sharma and Garg (2015) studied Impact of Self-Efficacy on Employee Attrition: a Study
Show more

6 Read more

Gender Differences in Usage of Smartphone Among College Students

Gender Differences in Usage of Smartphone Among College Students

and the 4G Internet have become an almost essential part of daily life since their rapid growth and popularity in today’s world. A nationwide survey conducted in 2010 shows that mobile phones are the most necessary medium of communication. There is the conflicting priority of young people, parents, and teachers in relation to the mobile phone device, with teachers more concerned about issues such as discipline and disturbance in the classroom and parents worried about means of contacting their children at every point in time. The entry of smartphone, the evolution of social media like Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, WhatsApp, and affordable data plans, smartphone leads to excess data use which creates problems in the last five years. A famous quote of Chanakya (371 - 283 B.C) - "Everything in excess acts like a poison". Now excess use of internet causes multiple problems (Loan, 2011). The problems are found in both male and female. Now a day’s parents started providing all facility to their daughters equally with son, which is one of the reasons the percentage of girls in higher education is increasing every year. Parents are providing them hostel, smartphone all necessary things equal to sons. Male and female students differ in spending their time on the Internet. Female students spend more time on researching and gathering information for their study, and male students spend more time online playing games (Horvat, Oreski, Markic, 2014). The set of the most popular online activities is similar for both sexes, including checking e-mails, surfing or browsing the Web, and looking for news. The most significant gender difference in Internet usage patterns lies in men’s greater interest in the entertainment function of the medium (Anna Bujała,2012). There is a strong positive relationship between using the internet for educational practices such as active and collaborative learning and student-faculty interaction. (Laird and Kuh 2004). Students of business and commerce lead in using the internet for information, students of computer science use it predominantly for communication purposes and students of social sciences and humanities use it for education purposes compared to others. Information overload is the most common problem faced by students of all faculties while searching the relevant information (Loan 2011). The excessive internet usage adversely affects one’s physical health, family life and academic performance of the students. Academic problems caused by internet addiction include a decrease in study habits, drop in marks, poor attendance and poor participation in extracurricular activities. (Akhter 2013). The students spend 3 to 5 hours daily on the internet.
Show more

6 Read more

Students’ attitudes towards mathematics and math-gender stereotypes: gender and year levels

Students’ attitudes towards mathematics and math-gender stereotypes: gender and year levels

The semi-structured interview guidelines contain six questions and one focus-group interview lasts for around 20 to 30 minutes. The purpose of the interview is to have a deeper understanding of findings from survey about SATM, SMGS and the relationship between SATM and SMGS. Therefore, interview questions are mainly constructed in the form of “what”, “how” and “why” to explore students’ relevant learning experiences that impact their construction of attitudes towards mathematics. The structure of interview guidelines follows the salient aspects of the questionnaire including enjoyment, usefulness, anxiety, changes of attitudes, and math-gender stereotypes. For example, in order to investigate the extent to which students enjoy mathematics, participants are asked whether they like or dislike mathematics followed with sharing their relevant experiences and underpinning reasons. The aspect of anxiety is revealed by asking questions: “Do you feel anxious/nervous or relax when learning mathematics? How about in mathematics classes, during mathematics exam, and when doing mathematics homework?” The usefulness of mathematics is also explored through asking about participants’ experience of using mathematics in daily life, and about their potential opportunity to use mathematics in future life. Particularly, in order to make a comparison to survey findings about how SATM differs from Year 4 to Year 6 and the underpinning reasons, participants would be asked to describe their general attitudes towards mathematics this year and how different/similar these were compared with last year, and they would also be asked to share relevant experiences causing such results. SMGS is explored through asking students about gender differences or similarities in the contexts of learning mathematics and mathematical problem solving. Since it is the interview guideline, some more questions would be raised based on interviewees’ responses during the interview process.
Show more

178 Read more

Gender differences in mathematics and integrated science achievement among junior secondary school students

Gender differences in mathematics and integrated science achievement among junior secondary school students

This study adopted an ex-post facto research design. The population was made up of all the Junior Secondary School Students in Ekiti State, Nigeria while a sample of 840 students of both sexes were drawn from 2006 and 2007 Junior Secondary School Certifi cate Examinations (JSSCE) in Ekiti-State, Nigeria. The selection was done using stratifi ed random sampling technique, taking into consideration, the gender of the students and the type of school attended (private or public) from 20 Junior Secondary Schools. The sample was made in such a way that it cut across all the three senatorial districts of the Ekiti State, the which are: Ekiti North, which comprises fi ve local government areas, Ekiti Central which comprises fi ve local government areas, and Ekiti South which comprises six Local Government Areas. In all, 280 students were purposively selected from each of the three senatorial districts. The
Show more

13 Read more

Gender Differences, Mathematics Anxiety, And First-Year College Students Mathematical Achievement

Gender Differences, Mathematics Anxiety, And First-Year College Students Mathematical Achievement

The study used the descriptive survey type of research design. A total of 390 out of 471 first year BS Mathematics students of Bulacan State University who were enrolled during the first semester of School Year 2016-2017 were the subjects of this study. The researcher intended to use the total population of the first year BS Mathematics students, however, those who were not included were the students who were absent during the conduct of the survey or those who dropped the course Pre-Calculus II before the conduct of the survey. A short orientation on the purpose of the study was conducted and their participation is voluntary. Moreover, they were informed that they can stop and withdraw their participation even during the conduct of the survey. The Mathematics Self-efficacy and Anxiety Questionnaire developed and validated by May [17] was the main survey instrument used in this study. This instrument is used to explore how the students conceptualize their ability and fear towards mathematics. However, since this current study would only focus on exploring the influence of mathematics anxiety on student’s academic achievement, the researcher chose the items relating to student’s mathematics anxiety. A total of 16 out of 29 items were retained. Each items describes student’s fear relating to math class and the respondents need to rate how frequent they experience that feeling. Moreover, four factors were identified when analyzing student’s mathematics anxiety: grade factor, future factor, in- class factor, and assignment factor. The first factor reflected the students’ apprehensions their ability to get good grade in math. The Future factor includes students’ worries about using mathematics in their future careers, including with their apprehensions about
Show more

5 Read more

Gender Differences in the Language of Mathematics in Secondary Schools

Gender Differences in the Language of Mathematics in Secondary Schools

There is no significant difference between boys and girls in the understanding of the language of mathematics. This results suggests that, during the teaching and learning process, mathematics teachers should teach the language of mathematics the same way other spoken languages are taught. This approach would enable students to construct meaning internally, understanding what is asked, develops a correct plan in order to solve a problem and carrying out the plan. Therefore, deliberate efforts should be made to teach from simple language of mathematics to complex language of mathematics as an objective. Testing of the students’ understanding of the language of mathematics should start earlier in different schools, districts, and regional levels. When setting assignments, teachers should emphasize increasing students’ awareness and comprehension of mathematical concepts. Adopting these assessment techniques will allow mathematics teachers to direct students’ thinking towards the understanding of the language of mathematics.
Show more

7 Read more

Teachers’ Perceptions of Causes of Gender Differences in Mathematics Achievement Among Secondary School Students

Teachers’ Perceptions of Causes of Gender Differences in Mathematics Achievement Among Secondary School Students

Researches have been carried out to determine gender differences in mathematics achievement, some of the research results have shown significant differences while some did not show any difference. For instance, Zhang and Manon (2000) in Oluwatayo (2011) reported that males had a larger variance in mathematics scores than females, moreover females tended to outperform males among the low achieving students while males tended to outperform females among the high achieving students. Abiam and Odok (2006) reported no significant relationship between gender and achievement in number and numeration, algebraic processes, statistics and a weak significant relationship in Geometry and Trigonometry. Hyde, Fennema, and Lamon (1990) in Savitas and Akdemir (2009) through meta-analysis revealed that males tend to do better on mathematics tests that involves problem-solving while female tend to do better in computation, and there is no significant gender difference in understanding mathematics concepts. Akhateeb (2001) reported that females outperformed males in mathematics achievement.
Show more

5 Read more

Gender differences in Taiwan high school studentsõ computer game playing

Gender differences in Taiwan high school studentsõ computer game playing

In addition, a close review of past studies indicates inconsistent research results regarding the impacts of computer games on adolescentsÕ lives. Some researchers ar- gue that computer games may enhance the playersÕ self-confidence, social skills, and so on (e.g., Favaro, 1982; Smith, Curtin, & Newman, 1995), while others note that over-involvement in computer games may lead to academic or other problems (e.g., Roe & Muijs, 1998). The present researchers speculate that the impacts of computer games are multi-dimensional, that is, the impacts on any individual might be both positive and negative, simultaneously. However, negative impacts are usually dem- onstrated by explicit behaviors, and are thus more obvious and easily observed (e.g., poor grades, lost sleep, health problems, etc.). Since relevant empirical data in this field are scarce in Taiwan, the present researchers began tackling this issue by investigating the general impacts of computer games on subjectsÕ daily lives before attempting to explore implicit psychological gains or losses (e.g., enhanced self-con- fidence, personality development, etc.). We employed self-reports and self-ratings from Taiwan game players in order to examine playersÕ evaluations of the impacts of game playing on their own lives.
Show more

13 Read more

Self-concept and the Gender Differences in Mathematics

Self-concept and the Gender Differences in Mathematics

In a comparative study by Kauchana (2002), gender differences in Mathematics self-concept of Indian and American undergraduate college students was investigated. The sample consisted of 196 American students (63 male and 133 female) and 150 Indian students (45 male and 105 female) from Chennai, India. A self-concept description questionnaire intended for use by adolescents and young adults 16 to 25 years was used. For the Indian sample, the mean score for males and females were 4.82 and 4.18 respectively, and the results indicated that male college students has a significant higher Mathematics self-concept (t = .17, p < 0.01) than female college students. However, difference in Mathematics self-concept between Indian students (mean = 4.38) and American students (mean = 4.51) did not reach statistical significance. In his view, it is indeed a challenge to the Indian culture, to enhance the self-concept of all students, while retaining the sense of belongingness of both the sexes. The findings in the above mentioned studies appear to support the notion that boys have higher Mathematics self-concept than girls; however, some studies have reported contradictory findings.
Show more

15 Read more

Mathematics Anxiety, Mathematics Performance and Gender differences among Undergraduate Students

Mathematics Anxiety, Mathematics Performance and Gender differences among Undergraduate Students

athematics anxiety is one of the most important problems for many students. “mathematics anxiety involves feelings of tension and anxiety that interfere with the manipulation of numbers and the solving of mathematical problems in a wide variety of ordinary life and academic situations” (Richardson & Suinn, 1972, p. 551). However, Byrd (1982) accepted this kind of definition as deficient both from conceptualization of mathematics and also from conceptualization of anxiety perspectives. Thus, it should be regarded from a larger perspective as a complex construct consisting of “affective, behavioral and cognitive responses to a perceived threat to self- esteem which occurs as a response to situations involving mathematics” (Atkinson, 1988). Generally, high level of anxiety is more closely associated with lower performance among low ability students (Sena et al., 2007). Mathematics anxiety can be defined as a state of discomfort created when students are required to perform mathematical tasks (Cemen, 1987). However, there is no general consensus among the scholars on its causes and effects. In fact, mathematics anxiety is more than a dislike toward mathematics (Vinson, 2001). Thus it can be observed that mathematical basic skills or concepts acquired in lower form are vital for students (Siti & Rohani, 2010). The
Show more

6 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...