Top PDF Graduate choices in post-education jobs and careers : a literature review, May 2019

Graduate choices in post-education jobs and careers : a literature review, May 2019

Graduate choices in post-education jobs and careers : a literature review, May 2019

Looking at the extent to which jobs are part of their long-term career plans, the most recent Longitudinal Destination of Leavers of Higher Education (L-DLHE) survey found that this percentage increased over time (from 20% six months after graduation to 36% 2.5 years after completing the degree). Evidence from the Futuretrack study also shows that graduates are still settling into their careers 1-2 years after graduation. The highest percentage of those who got exactly the job they wanted had studied medicine and dentistry (87%) followed by subjects allied to medicine (71%), education and engineering (both 58%). A survey of creative graduates undertaken 4-6 years after graduation found that 79% reported that they either work in their chosen career or in an area that is very or fairly close to it. This figure seems relatively high compared to the others and may be due to the fact the graduates have settled into their careers prior to the 2008 recession and were surveyed later on in their career.
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Choices that students make between different post-18 routes and whether these choices are effective and reliably informed : review of relevant literature and evidence. Final Report, May 2019

Choices that students make between different post-18 routes and whether these choices are effective and reliably informed : review of relevant literature and evidence. Final Report, May 2019

The post-16 education and training landscape has changed radically. For 16-18 year olds: they must stay in education or training until age 18; there has been a change in the number and range of providers; and an increased emphasis on apprenticeships as a mechanism for meeting the vocational aspirations of young people and the labour market needs of employers. The introduction of T-Level qualifications over the coming years will also provide additional options. For 19-24 year olds the main route continues to be HE, despite the financial costs for students being increased. Advanced and degree level apprenticeships have created progression pathways for young people to higher level qualifications and skills outside of the HE academic route. The main growth in
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Careers education : international literature review

Careers education : international literature review

Abstract: A study identified different educational and working paths that workers take, asked which paid off for long-term wage growth and career development, and tested whether educational pathways helped explain more of the variability in wage outcomes. It compared long-term wage growth for two cohorts of young white men: the original cohort that entered the labor force in the late 1960s at the end of the post-World War II economic boom and the recent cohort that entered in the early 1980s after the onset of economic restructuring. Long-term wage growth between the ages 16-36 declined and became significantly more unequal for the recent cohort. The rising demand for education and skill in the new labor market apparently benefitted only those with four- year college degrees. Rising inequality in wage growth was found in all education groups. Working while enrolled and interrupting and returning to school were the dominant pathways to educational attainment. A second set of analyses focused on the recent cohort. Multiple regressions showed educational pathways had a strong effect on long-term wage growth: working while enrolled had a positive impact and interrupted schooling had a negative one. Career choices about industry and occupation mattered. Taking an academic track in high school paid off for workers who get some college credit or enter occupations requiring cognitive skill. Applied and practical fields of study offered the most long-term wage growth to college graduates. Shandra, C. L., and Hogan, D. P. (2008). School-to-work program participation and the post-
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Graduate employability and competence development in higher education: a systematic literature review using PRISMA

Graduate employability and competence development in higher education: a systematic literature review using PRISMA

considerable change to our educational systems and significant economic disruption. The OECD Interim Economic Assessment (2020) stresses coronavirus containment efforts have involved quarantines and widespread restrictions on labour mobility and travel. The impacts of such constraints are significant, including the direct disruption to global supply chains, weaker final demand for imported goods and services, and broader regional declines in international tourism and business travel. Therefore, growth prospects are very uncertain, and currently, there are no accurate assumptions of the future concerning economy and employment. The relevance of this paper is thus further heightened by the present global context. Competence development approaches, mostly those which focus on the development of transversal competences, are even more crucial when economies are facing recession and the need for a rapid adaptation requiring flexibility and problem solving—although competence development can by no means be thought of as a panacea for such severe conditions, it may nonetheless make a difference to individuals’ pathways when navigating these dire circumstances and trying to increase their odds in building successful careers. The current economy will demand skills that displace traditional ones. Vincent-Lancrin et al. [37], in their 2019 paper, identify a mix of skills that societies, higher education institutions and policymakers can contribute to foster. They highlight the relevance of higher education systems and institutions facing the challenge of equipping students with the skills required. Also, the debate about automation and the future of work has brought this issue to the heart of the matter (e.g., OECD Employment Outlook, 2012 [1]). In industry, human resources departments are working towards identifying skills that can be more difficult to automate [2]. Employee skill utilization can be seen as a driver of employees’ outcomes and the sustainability of ‘best practice’ arguments across all skill levels, even in the face of recession. Therefore, nowadays, common policies are being developed to foster higher-order skills such as creativity and critical thinking as well as socio-emotional skills (see Vicent-Lancrin et al., 2019 [37]). For instance, in 2016, chief executive officers and chief human resource officers of multinational and large domestic companies answered the World Economic Forum’s ‘Future of Job’ survey identifying critical skills for the labour market [38]. In 2018, the study reported similar results [39]. Remarkably, the 2018 paper underlines the importance of human skills such as creativity, originality and initiative, critical thinking, persuasion and negotiation [39].
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Serial founder entrepreneurs: careers and corridors, venture choices and outcomes

Serial founder entrepreneurs: careers and corridors, venture choices and outcomes

The accepted view is that a very small proportion of new ventures are highly successful while most, in contrast, fail (Baron and Henry, 2010). In reality, success and failure may not be such contrasting ‘black’ or ‘white’ outcomes. There are a number of reasons for business exit: (1) voluntary exits to acquire a better job or venture, (2) exits due to personal circumstances, (3) exits by selling the firm to harvest wealth or avoid losses and (4) bankruptcy (Birley and Westhead, 1993; Politis, and Gabrielsson, 2007; Wennberg, Wiklund, DeTienne and Cardon, 2010). Failure is most often defined as financial infeasibility or unsustainability (Amaral, Baptista, and Lima 2009; Gimeno, Cooper and Woo, 1997; Headd, 2003). However, research suggests that most terminations are voluntary quits rather than involuntary bankruptcies (Bates, 2005; Taylor, 1999), with approximately one-third of firms profitable at termination (Headd, 2003). Stokes and Blackburn (2002) find that while almost half of closed businesses were ailing, the others were quite evenly split between thriving and simply not growing. Therefore, there is evidence that many outcomes fall into a ‘gray-zone’ of near-failures and near-successes with different stakeholders having differing views (Rerup, 2006). Business closure is not then merely reacting to financial infeasibility.
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Post-16 aspirations and outcomes : comparison of the LSYPE cohorts. May 2019

Post-16 aspirations and outcomes : comparison of the LSYPE cohorts. May 2019

The answer to this main over-arching question is that not too much changed. Certainly, there has been no large shift from academic to vocational choices, inspired by the relative costs of undertaking each. The academic post-16 route of A-levels then university remained as the most popular route to take, particularly amongst those with high prior attainment and those from an advantaged family background. The strength of the relationship between some characteristics and applying to university increased between cohorts. For example women and non-white ethnic minorities, already more likely to apply in Cohort 1, became even more likely relative to men and white individuals in Cohort 2. Within the academic route, there was some evidence of change, with an increased popularity of STEM subjects for university degrees, and a corresponding relative fall in the popularity of arts based degrees.
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16-19 education funding : trends and implications. May 2019

16-19 education funding : trends and implications. May 2019

Address the narrowness of 16-19 education. Students are generally receiving fewer learning hours than in previous years. The decoupling of AS and A levels has resulted in a dramatic fall in AS levels, that has not been compensated with additional provision. Given that the 16-19 curriculum in England was already narrow compared to top-performing countries, this is likely to further compromise the breadth of post-16 education. With relevant international studies showing that England stands out for the low levels of basic skills of its young people, the government should assess the impact of 16-19 funding changes on curriculum breadth and ensure that young people have a good choice of high quality post-16 academic and vocational qualifications.
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Impact of the student finance system on participation, experience and outcomes of disadvantaged young
people: Literature review, May 2019

Impact of the student finance system on participation, experience and outcomes of disadvantaged young people: Literature review, May 2019

student/consumer perspective. Minty (2015) for example notes how prospective students want greater transparency about how fee income is spent by universities. The UUK work with students (2015) found that despite high levels of satisfaction, ‘there was a clear concern among current undergraduate students about whether their financial investment represents value for money’ (p18) (46% feeling their university experience had been poor value for money), and this is related to subject studied, contact hours and access to staff, availability of careers advice and support, and quality facilities. The research found that students also factored in employability into their views on value for money. Research by NUS (2016) with the first cohort of graduates affected by the 2012 reforms found that, although the majority of new graduates enjoyed and valued many aspects of their degree, the majority (56%) did not believe it was worth the fees charged. Those who paid higher fees were much more likely to believe their degree was not worth the costs. Also within this theme is the potential for institutions to vary fees and financial support to affect recruitment, to essentially use these as marketing tools (with institutions competing for students). Indeed, the research argues that the policy ambition for institutional
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Competencies for food graduate careers: developing a language tool

Competencies for food graduate careers: developing a language tool

As a sample of the target population was used for the study, the subject of generalisability (Muijs, 2010) needs to be considered. With regard to the methodology used, the researcher understands that using 12 stakeholders as participants is unlikely to represent all the views from the UK food industry with regard to food science graduate skills. However, the con- scious choice of participants from different business types, sizes and roles within the supply chain aimed to provide the most sensible approach and thus a stratified sample. A wider sample size could be used in such a study but would have to be evaluated for the value versus the additional time and resource required to conduct the interviews and analyse the data. The choice of a semi-structured approach to interviewing was used in order to gather data in an exploratory way but with the associated support of prompt material. The pre-designed lexicon as a prompt to encourage participants’ ideas and to ensure overall capture of commonly published themes of ‘graduate skills’ was considered beneficial. A number of the terms in the lexicon were not carried into the final version of Competencies for Food Graduate Careers and completely new ones were gathered from the interview material, so the concern of possibly leading the participant by suggesting themes or terms appears to have been avoided.
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Full & Part-Time Certificate in Education Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)

Full & Part-Time Certificate in Education Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)

opportunities for successful applicants to undertake their teaching practice at Runshaw College. Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) applicants will need to have a 2.2 honours degree or higher in order to be considered for a placement at Runshaw. support from a specialist work placement officer to help you to obtain a high quality, supervised teaching placement.

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Post-occupancy evaluation: a review of literature

Post-occupancy evaluation: a review of literature

Education and culture. Within the AECO sector, many designers, builders and project managers believe that they are in possession of in-depth knowledge of building performance, when often such knowledge extends only to the experience required to create and adjust buildings (Bordass and Leaman, 2005). Furthermore, there remains a notable absence of any obligation or payment to undertake a POE and POE implementation does not feature in contemporary architectural courses (Cooper, 2001).

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Location choices of multinational companies in transition economies: A literature review

Location choices of multinational companies in transition economies: A literature review

The relevance of the institutional perspective for location choices of MNCs has gained a much wider audience recently. It focuses explicitly on the embeddedness of firms into local institutional environments (Kostova and Zaheer, 1999). Foreign firms become highly dependent on the institutional factors at the chosen location for investment and have to adapt themselves (at least to a certain degree) to the local institutional framework in order to gain legitimacy and integration within the regional economic system. FDI from developed into developing countries depends even more on institutional parameters, since developed country MNCs are used to a business environment shaped by a set of rather complete market- based institutions in their home markets (Kang and Jiang, 2012). Nevertheless, these MNCs are often big players in their industry and have the power to shape institutional contexts in the host country due to their large size, superior capabilities and dominant position in global value chains. Thus, an interdependent perspective on institutional quality, location choices of MNC, and institutional change is needed.
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A Review of the Literature on Zakah between 2003 and 2019

A Review of the Literature on Zakah between 2003 and 2019

The development of Islam-based economy in Indonesia has been close to stepping into the fourth decade since the establishment of Bank Muamalat in Indonesia back in 1992. Specifically to the studies of sharia accounting, massive discussions started to emerge early in the 2000s with a stress mainly placed on the epistemology and development direction of sharia accounting in the future. The discussions were led by three figures, Prof. Sofyan Syafri Harahap (almarhum, Allah yarham), Prof. Iwan Triyuwono, and Assoc.Prof. Madya Muhammad Akhyar Adnan. Not only relates to profit-oriented entities, sharia accounting development has also touched the public sector, including mosques and Zakah Managing Organization (OPZ). It was observed that the first publication related to Zakah accounting study recorded was an article published on the journal “Media Riset Akuntansi, Auditing & Informasi” in 2002 by Harahap and Yusuf (2002) which reviewed the patterns of Zakah calculation, identification of Zakah imposition and recognition, and issues on Zakah reporting to sharia-based business entities. It can be said that this serves as the starting point of studies specifically concerning Zakah accounting in Indonesia (Sofyani, 2019). As stated by Johari (2014), paying Zakah constitutes one of the five fundamental obligations of the Muslims. It is a mandatory
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Education and adjustment : a review of the literature

Education and adjustment : a review of the literature

5.14 Public spending per student during the 1980s remained less than half the 1975 level. From 1980 to 1985, recurrent spending per primary teacher decreased approximately 15 percent. T[r]

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Low-wage careers: Are there dead-end firms and dead-end jobs?

Low-wage careers: Are there dead-end firms and dead-end jobs?

that upward wage mobility differs among employees, with certain groups such as female and older workers having lower chances of reaching higher-paid jobs. While these and other individual determinants of upward mobility have been investigated in many studies, due to a lack of data relatively few studies have been able to analyze the impact of firm and workplace characteristics on employees’ chance of escaping low-paid work. To be sure, a few studies exist that point to the relevance of the size and sector affiliation of a firm for employees’ upward wage mobility (see, e.g., Stewart and Swaffield 1999; Cappellari 2002; Andersson et al. 2005). For Germany, Schank et al. (2009) recently have shown that low-wage employment is concentrated (and upward wage mobility is lower) in small firms and in certain industries. With Danish data, Bolvig (2005) has demonstrated that the characteristics of the employing firm matters for low-wage employees’ likelihood of escaping a low-wage job, and she has been able to identify three types of firms: firms with high within-firm upward wage mobility, firms with high between- firm upward wage mobility (i.e. stepping-stones) and firms with low upward wage mobility (i.e. dead-end firms).
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Competence formation and post graduate education in the public water sector in Indonesia

Competence formation and post graduate education in the public water sector in Indonesia

The primary target group for the interviews and the survey was the professional staff of the DGWR, i.e. those holding at least an MSc or equivalent degree in a civil engineering or water resource related discipline. The interview respon- dents from the DGWR (the primary target group) were se- lected to form a representative sample on the basis of two main criteria: (i) the type of education they had enjoyed in the water field, that is, a locally-based (LPE) or international post-graduate education (IPE), and (ii) their involvement in the MPW during one of its three paradigmatic phases in the recent history of the Indonesian water sector (defined by year of recruitment). The DGWR respondents were eligible to register for a wide range of post-graduate programmes, rang- ing from engineering to business and social science degrees. The LPE respondents acquired their master’s degrees at Ga- jah Madah University, the University of Indonesia, the Uni- versity of Sri Wijaya, the Institute of Technology Bandung or the Institute of Technology Surabaya, amongst others. The IPE respondents acquired their master’s degrees at various international institutions, such as the Colorado State Uni- versity in the USA, the University of Manitoba in Canada, (UNESCO-)IHE or the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, the University of Grenoble or the Univer- sity of Lyon in France, the Asian Institute of Technology in Thailand or the Indian Institute of Technology in India. For the semi-structured interviews, the secondary target group in- cluded people external to the DGWR, yet involved in water management in Indonesia from 1980 to the present day, with a good overview of the water sector. Respondents from the
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Careers in Art and Art Education

Careers in Art and Art Education

No. 412 Standards For Art Teacher Preparation Carole Henry, Chair. Guidelines and standards include three sections: standards for the art program, standards for art education faculty, and standards and skills for art teacher candidates. The standards are inclusive of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) requirements. The art teacher candidate categories are inclusive of those aspects identified as essential to effective teaching developed by NBPTS (National Board for Professional Teaching Standards) and INTASC (Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium). 28 pp. {1999} ISBN 1-890160-11-3 $15.00; Member Price $10.00 No. 232 Preservice Art Education: Issues and Practice Lynn Galbraith, Editor. This new anthology examines how preservice teachers, art specialists, and classroom teachers make sense of their art teacher education course work. Insights are offered into how preservice is shaped and influenced. Organized in a tripartite framework, Preservice Art Education examines “Learning to Teach: The Preservice Teacher,” “Teaching Others to Teach: The Art Teacher Educator,” and “Preservice Practice.” An important resource/text for anyone in the business of preparing students to be trustees of the ways of life for the pupils they will teach and who will become stewards and authors of their own lives. 188 pp. {1995} ISBN 0- 937652-86-5 $22.00; Member Price $15.00
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Careers in Art and Art Education

Careers in Art and Art Education

http:// www.nasdtec.org/docs/NIC_2005-2010.doc Most teachers seek employment in the state and county or school district where they reside. However, moving from one state to another and finding a teach- ing job has been simplified by the Interstate Contract, a mutual agreement by 38 states and the District of Columbia to recognize each other’s licenses. Pro- spective teachers may find information on available positions at state department and school district offices, in county bulletins and newsletters, and on state education department web sites. In addition to the public school system, there are numerous private schools, organized by religious or cultural mission or by academic program. Teachers in 65% of these schools are not required to be licensed by the state, and state requirements vary.
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Accounting education literature review (2017)

Accounting education literature review (2017)

Pincus, Stout, Sorensen, Stocks, and Lawson (2017) surveyed attendees (n=61) at the 2017 Accounting Program Leadership Group conference regarding four issues: (1) offering new on-campus programs or revising existing programs, (2) creating new online degrees or certificate programs, (3) strategic changes in faculty structure, and (4) changes to the financial model for their programs. One noteworthy finding was that only eight of 61 respondents (13%) reported that their programs had developed significant new sources of revenue during the past three years. The authors discussed how financial challenges and technology advances are affecting higher education, in general, and accounting education, in particular. The traditional higher education financial model includes variables such as student demographics, student debt, government support, and donations. Some technology components of higher education are the growth of off- shore work, automation of accounting and finance tasks, and a growing gap between skills needed in the workplace and skills possessed by college graduates. The authors observed that technology has not significantly changed what is taught in accounting education programs or how accounting educators teach, emphasizing a point that has been made numerous times in the literature. The declining number of college-age students and the financial constraints on students and institutions will require that universities and accounting programs respond to remain
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Speech: Prime Minister Theresa May: Augar Review launch: 30 May 2019

Speech: Prime Minister Theresa May: Augar Review launch: 30 May 2019

But in technical education we have fallen behind other leading nations. Our further education colleges have the potential to transform lives and grow our economy, but the FE landscape can be confusing to navigate. Too many students, parents and employers see further education as a second-best option.

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