Top PDF Graduates in non-graduate occupations

Graduates in non-graduate occupations

Graduates in non-graduate occupations

positions. Using econometric modelling, Piper (2015) identified a negative association between relative over-education and life satisfaction. Scurry and Blenkinsopp (2014) suggested that the view of graduates on their position in non-graduate jobs has implications for the way they cope with their situation - if graduates see their current employment as a ‘temporary’ stopgap, they insulate themselves from the negative effects of their situation. ‘Hope’ is a very strong explanatory variable in understanding the impact of a precarious situation on mental health (Behle, 2005). However, some graduates might not be interested in taking on a graduate job - according to the Employer Skills Survey, some workers indicated that the circumstances of non-graduate occupations, especially the working hours, were better suited to them (UKCES, 2015) or their lifestyle (Elias and Purcell, 2004).
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Graduates in non graduate occupations

Graduates in non graduate occupations

positions. Using econometric modelling, Piper (2015) identified a negative association between relative over-education and life satisfaction. Scurry and Blenkinsopp (2014) suggested that the view of graduates on their position in non-graduate jobs has implications for the way they cope with their situation - if graduates see their current employment as a ‘temporary’ stopgap, they insulate themselves from the negative effects of their situation. ‘Hope’ is a very strong explanatory variable in understanding the impact of a precarious situation on mental health (Behle, 2005). However, some graduates might not be interested in taking on a graduate job - according to the Employer Skills Survey, some workers indicated that the circumstances of non-graduate occupations, especially the working hours, were better suited to them (UKCES, 2015) or their lifestyle (Elias and Purcell, 2004).
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Higher education, graduate skills and the skills of graduates : the case of graduates as residential sales estate agents

Higher education, graduate skills and the skills of graduates : the case of graduates as residential sales estate agents

The expansion of higher education (HE) has led to increasing focus on graduate employability and skills as the route to finding suitable employment (Brooks et al. 2012; Davis et al 2013;Author A, 2014). At the same time what constitutes a graduate job has become more ambiguous (Elias and Purcell, 2013). Alongside traditional graduate jobs, new graduate occupations have come into existence and a growing number of graduates are moving into occupations that were previously non-graduate. While there remains a tight match between graduate skills and the skill requirements of traditional professions (Elias and Purcell, 2004), and there also seems to be a new coupling of skill demand and supply in the new graduate occupations (Chillas, 2010), there is currently little empirical evidence on the skills needed to get jobs in previously non-graduate occupations that are graduatising. Moreover despite recent policy attention to skills utilisation – the deployment in work of the skills possessed by workers – there is little understanding of the skills required of graduates to do these jobs (Keep and Mayhew 2010). As a consequence it is not clear if and if so which skills possessed by graduates have utility in the labour market and labour process of graduatising occupations. Providing this understanding is important given the over- 2
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Graduate pathways: a longitudinal study of graduates in outdoor studies in the U.K.

Graduate pathways: a longitudinal study of graduates in outdoor studies in the U.K.

In terms of a critique of electronic contact, email does tend to reach the travellers and frequent ‘movers’ which, in this kind of study, are thought to constitute a significant percentage of the sample and there is an immediate return from accounts which have expired. However, on the negative side, problems with the network affect responses and sometimes there seemed to be a lack of understanding of the rationale for the project (perhaps a reflection of the explanatory attachment being unread?). In one case, a blank form was returned because the respondent had overwritten her own form. In most cases, the electronic returns tended to be lengthier than those sent back in the post. However, although there might be a problem in the currency of email addresses, this is rapid in its solution and email is cheap to administer. To compensate for any bias from non-response, characteristics of gender, age, time since graduation and class of degree were collated. Evidence from Χ 2 indicated that no bias was present and peer reports indicated that working
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Higher education, graduate skills and the skills of graduates : the case of graduates as residential sales estate agents

Higher education, graduate skills and the skills of graduates : the case of graduates as residential sales estate agents

Already there is indication that some graduates are questioning this investment as the percentage of recent graduates (less than five years after graduation) working in jobs deemed non-graduate has risen to almost half (47%) (ONS, 2013). Robust research is needed but, according to a survey conducted by the website notgoingtouni.co.uk, 31 per cent of respondents believed that their degree was ‘completely irrelevant’ to their current job. More than half wished that they had opted for further education rather than HE, with 61 per cent believing that in doing so they would have gained a better job (Parr 2013). Similarly in a survey of employed and unemployed graduates conducted by Citizens Advice Scotland (McLister 2012), many respondents lamented the lack of career advice about alternatives to attending university: ‘Other options were brushed aside,’ said one respondent (p.15). Respondents also noted a lack of focus in universities on employability skills and the lack of exploration of the skills students do acquire in university.
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Higher education, graduate skills and the skills of graduates: the case of graduates as residential sales estate agents

Higher education, graduate skills and the skills of graduates: the case of graduates as residential sales estate agents

Already there is indication that some graduates are questioning this investment as the percentage of recent graduates (less than five years after graduation) working in jobs deemed non-graduate has risen to almost half (47%) (ONS, 2013). Robust research is needed but, according to a survey conducted by the website notgoingtouni.co.uk, 31 per cent of respondents believed that their degree was ‘completely irrelevant’ to their current job. More than half wished that they had opted for further education rather than HE, with 61 per cent believing that in doing so they would have gained a better job (Parr 2013). Similarly in a survey of employed and unemployed graduates conducted by Citizens Advice Scotland (McLister 2012), many respondents lamented the lack of career advice about alternatives to attending university: ‘Other options were brushed aside,’ said one respondent (p.15). Respondents also noted a lack of focus in universities on employability skills and the lack of exploration of the skills students do acquire in university.
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Graduate Employability: Views of Recent Science Graduates and Employers

Graduate Employability: Views of Recent Science Graduates and Employers

Recent science graduates were defined as those who had graduated during 2012–2015 from any of the five schools of the Faculty of Science at Monash: Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Earth, Atmosphere and Environment, Mathematical Sciences, and Physics and Astronomy. Proportions of graduates in terms of their year of graduation were: 2012 – 28%, 2013 – 28%, 2014 – 29% and 2015 – 15%. Of the 167 graduates, at the time of response, 95 (57%) were employed, 64 (38%) were engaged in further studies and eight (5%) were unemployed and looking for a job. Within the employed graduate cohort, 65 were working in science-based sectors, 22 in non-science sectors, and 10 were engaged in teaching in a secondary school. The employer group represents a range of industry types and sizes. Representations of employers from different industry types are as follows: eight from each of medical research, biotechnology, environmental research and cosmetic manufacturing; five from the food industry, and two from each of water technology, ICT, geophysics research, marine research, the mineral industry, instrument manufacturing, chemical manufacturing and metrology. The numbers of employees working in these industries also varies – ranging from seven to over 1600 employees (with an average of 350 employees).
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The participation of Black and minority ethnic graduates in science, engineering and technology occupations in the Northwest of England

The participation of Black and minority ethnic graduates in science, engineering and technology occupations in the Northwest of England

As with the undergraduates we wanted to explore issues relating to equality and diversity practices in the workplace. In contrast to the undergraduates, where we asked if they thought that their ethnicity could affect their career, with the graduates we asked them if they had experienced discrimination. With regard to employed graduates, about 87% of the respondents said that they have never been unfairly treated at their workplace because of their nationality, ethnicity or religious beliefs. However, 7.2% (5) of BME and 5.9% (2) of white graduates had experienced some form of unfair treatment and thought these incidents were racially or religious belief based. The small proportion of respondents who reported being treated less favourably at work based on race and religious grounds held a common view that racial prejudice and discrimination do exist but in a very isolated manner. One BME graduate said:
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The effect of business or enterprise training on opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial skills of graduates and non-graduates in the UK

The effect of business or enterprise training on opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial skills of graduates and non-graduates in the UK

The potential impact of enterprise training on the supply of entrepreneruship in a country has long been recognized. For example, Liebenstein (1968, p.82) noted that “…training can do something to increase the supply of entrepreneurship …since entrepreneurship requires a combination of capacities, some of which may be vital gaps in carrying out the input-completging aspect of the entrepreneurial role, training can eliminate some of these gaps.” In the UK, the issue of enterprise training features prominently in enterprise policy, particularly for graduates. For example, the National Council for Graduate Entrepreneurship was set up in 2004 to increase graduate entrepreneurship through the provision of more and better enterprise training in UK institutes of higher education (www.ncge.com).
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Non-technical skill gaps in Australian business graduates

Non-technical skill gaps in Australian business graduates

Industry, governments and accrediting bodies across developed economies thus now expect higher education providers (HEP) to incorporate non-technical skill development into undergraduate programs, the responsibility gradually shifting from the workplace to the classroom (Cassidy, 2006). This is challenged by some educators as ‘distracting’ universities from achieving their overarching goals of developing intellect, critical thought and the inquiry skills required of potential leaders (Starkey, Hatchuel & Tempest, 2004). Many believe this focus on employability has de-valued the once highly regarded and unique undergraduate degree as it has become ‘marketized’ (Kirp, 2003) and more synonymous with vocational offerings. Despite these concerns, the introduction of accreditation criteria and conditional funding rules for addressing graduate attributes are policy examples further catalysing non- technical skill development in HEPs.
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Factors influencing the Entrepreneurial Intention of Graduate and Non-Graduate Students in Bangladesh

Factors influencing the Entrepreneurial Intention of Graduate and Non-Graduate Students in Bangladesh

In developing countries, Entrepreneurship plays a great role to economic growth. Entrepreneurship creates new fields for the job seeker and it will ultimately reduce the unemployment problem of the country. Bangladesh is a developing country and here unemployment problem is a big issue in recent period. Entrepreneurship and service has a mutual exclusive relationship. The people wants to become entrepreneur are feeling discourage to become a service holder. In contrary the people wants to become service holder are feeling discourage to become an entrepreneur. There are some factors that greatly influence the entrepreneurial intention of the students. Basically a student takes decision by considering the present and future benefit of both entrepreneurship and service. Here we have select 400 graduates and non-graduates students to know their career objectives as well as their intension towards entrepreneurship. Only 64 respondents through positive response to entrepreneurship and they have little positive attitude towards the financial support, economic condition, scope and political condition in the perspective of Bangladesh. They also think that it has a poor social acceptance. But maximum respondents thought that it is an independent concern and it will make them more satisfied. Here we want to get the attention of the relevant bodies that will play a great role to develop these factors. If these factors are developed we will get more entrepreneurs. The enhancement of entrepreneurship will helps to reduce the unemployment problem as well as it will positively affect the economy of the country .
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2011 Graduate Survey. Aggregate May and July 2011 Graduates Number of Graduates: 764 Number Completing Survey: 355 Percent Completing Survey: 46.

2011 Graduate Survey. Aggregate May and July 2011 Graduates Number of Graduates: 764 Number Completing Survey: 355 Percent Completing Survey: 46.

8. Current Salary (For Employment Related to Program of Study) Below $6.00 per hour (Approx $12,500 per Year) 5 (2.7%) $6.00 - $7.99 per hour (Approx $14,500 per Year) 26 (14.3%) $8.00 – $9.99 per hour (Approx $19,000 per Year) 44 (24.2%) $10.00-$11.99 per hour (Approx $23,000 per Year) 42 (23.1%) $12.00-$13.99 per hour (Approx $27,000 per Year) 22 (12.1%) $14.00-$15.99 per hour (Approx $31,000 per Year) 20 (11.0%) $16.00-$17.99 per hour (Approx $35,000 per Year) 6 (3.3%) $18.00-$19.99 per hour (Approx $40,000 per Year) 3 (1.6%) $20.00 per hour or more (Over $42,000 per Year) 14 (7.7%) Number of Non-Respondents 170
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Connecting With The Graduates: An Online Employability Graduate Tracer Study (O-EGTS) Of Isabela State University

Connecting With The Graduates: An Online Employability Graduate Tracer Study (O-EGTS) Of Isabela State University

Fig. 1 presents the conceptual framework of the online employability graduate tracer study (o-EGTS). The independent variables are the characteristics and qualifications of graduates, which include the demographical, educational, and situational profile of the graduates. The dependent variables are the employment factors such as employment situations, employment status, occupations, place of work, nature of work, relatedness of first job to college course of the graduates; waiting time/search time in landing for the job; job position level; gross monthly income in first job and current job. Also, situation factors like reasons for staying, accepting, and changing jobs.
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Do employability skills really matter in the UK graduate labour market? the case of business and management graduates

Do employability skills really matter in the UK graduate labour market? the case of business and management graduates

This article seeks to explore the extent to which levels of reported ‘employability’ appear to influence employment outcomes and assist in overcoming traditional social disadvantage for a cohort of 1999 B&M graduates. Previous research (Wilton 2007) has shown that B&M students are more likely to be drawn from sections of society targeted by the widening participation agenda, including those from lower socio-economic backgrounds and those who, under an elite system, would have been unlikely to attend university, including students who attend newer higher education institutions (HEIs), enter HE via non-standard routes or have relatively low pre-entry qualifications. Undergraduate B&M education is also studied by relatively equal proportions of men and women. B&M graduates would however appear to be well placed to exploit the opportunities described by advocates of HE expansion, possessing the mix of employability skills and business knowledge desired by employers (Wilton 2008). The central question that this article seeks to address is whether the experience of recent B&M graduates gives credence to the policy emphasis on employability or whether labour market success continues to be more greatly predicated on long-established biases towards particular types of graduates rather than the development of skills in HE. In order to address this question, the article first considers B&M graduates’ assessment of the extent to which their degree studies contributed to the development of employability skills and whether subgroups of graduates report differing levels of development. The article then considers the extent to which differential levels of employability skills development translate into employment outcomes when considered alongside a range of educational and social group characteristics. Specifically, the analysis focuses on graduate characteristics associated with HE expansion and the widening participation agenda; gender, age, type of HEI attended and ethnicity.
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Do employability skills really matter in the UK graduate labour market? The case of business and management graduates

Do employability skills really matter in the UK graduate labour market? The case of business and management graduates

This paper explores whether, for a cohort of UK B&M graduates, labour market success was associated with the attainment of business and management employability skills and commercial awareness or more greatly predicated on long-established biases towards particular ‘types’ of graduates (on the basis of, for example, social class, gender or HEI attended). Previous analysis (e.g. CEML 2002a; Wilton 2007) has shown that B&M students are more likely to be drawn from sections of society targeted by the widening participation agenda, including those from lower socio-economic backgrounds and those who, under an elite system of higher education, would have been unlikely to attend university (i.e. those who attend ‘new’ higher education institutions, entered HE via non-standard routes or have relatively low pre-entry qualifications). Undergraduate B&M education is also studied by relatively equal proportions of men and women. For these reasons they tend to reflect a substantial part of the ‘new’ graduate labour supply that has been created by the expansion of the sector. As such, their experiences and employment outcomes can be seen as an indication of the extent to which demand has kept pace with supply for graduate labour. B&M graduates would appear well placed to exploit the opportunities described by policymakers and advocates of HE expansion, possessing the mix of employability skills and business knowledge desired by employers (Wilton 2008).
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The Role of Self-Efficacy and Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy on Entrepreneurial Intentions of Graduate Students: A Study among Omani Graduates

The Role of Self-Efficacy and Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy on Entrepreneurial Intentions of Graduate Students: A Study among Omani Graduates

This study is descriptive and quantitative in nature. The sample included graduate stu- dents enrolled in a business program at a private college in Muscat. A non-probability method of sampling was used. Using judgemental sampling, three hundred question- naires were distributed to the final year undergraduate students, out of which 274 stu- dents responded. Among the received responses, 263 responses were usable. The final sample constituted 137 male and 126 female students. The data was collected through self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of eight items measuring general SE adapted from Chen, Gully, and Eden (2001), and six statements measuring entrepreneurial intention adapted from Liñán and Chen (2009). One global statement measured ESE and entrepreneurial goals, and four independent items measured out- come expectations were adapted from Segal et al.(2002). Outcome expectations were measured by assessing respondents’ perception of the ability of self-employment in “making money,” “providing financial security,” “achieving independence,” and “satis- fying the need for achievement.” The questionnaire was pilot tested on 25 students for reliability. Based on the measure of reliability, the eight-items scale measuring general SE was reduced to six items and the six-items scale measuring entrepreneurial intention was reduced to three items. The final reliability measures of the 15-item scale (exclud- ing demographic variables) was 0.958. Table 1 details the reliability measures. Data was analysed with AMOS 23 and SPSS.
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The effect of business or enterprise training on opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial skills of graduates and non-graduates in the UK

The effect of business or enterprise training on opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial skills of graduates and non-graduates in the UK

The training types were: business or enterprise training at school, at college or university, placements in small or medium-sized businesses whilst at school or college/university, or in government programmes. We controlled for self-selection by asking each individual if the training was voluntary or compulsory, if they answered “yes” to any of the four training types. We examined graduates and non-graduates separately because of their different education experience, and their likely different career trajectory. We controlled for demographic characteristics of the individuals, including age, gender, employment status, education level at a finer grained level than graduate/non-graduate, ethnicity, migrant status, entrepreneurial attitudes including fear of failure, and an entrepreneurial networking measure (knowing a recently started entrepreneur). We controlled for experience with a dummy variable labelling individuals who had ever started a business. We used logistic regression to estimate the independent effect of different forms of business or enterprise training on individuals’ propensity to recognise opportunities and believe they had the skills necessary to start a business.
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Selection Determinants In Education Major Graduates Occupations

Selection Determinants In Education Major Graduates Occupations

Taiwan’s teacher training system currently faces a serious disorder. The excessive number of teacher education programs being set up in universities by the Ministry of Education has dramatically increased the number of teachers. The situation, coupled with the country of low birth rate and high retirement age, brings about fewer teaching vacancies than the number of available teachers. The over-expansion of universities has resulted in a situation that almost every secondary school graduate can access higher education institutions, which subsequently produce a great number of graduates, far exceeding the vacancies in the workplace. This plus with the recent economic recession intensifies competition among individuals hunting for jobs. Thus, it is imperative to identify the ideal jobs for graduates, and the first step is figuring out the main determinants for selecting jobs and the relative importance of these determinants. A self-developed questionnaire was administered to 200 education major graduates in Taiwan. The result indicated that high job stability was perceived to be the most important factor among participants. Also, the education students considered school teacher or administrator to be the ideal jobs.
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Occupations of Tromsø medical graduates

Occupations of Tromsø medical graduates

selection strategies, distributed non- metropolitan medical education may be a powerful strategy for recruitment and retention in rural areas (Sen Gupta et al. 2014). A particular success for the medical school in Tromsø has been the recurring population health studies, launched in 1974 and still proceeding (Jacobsen et al. 2012). This has stimulated to

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Job Placement and Graduate Work for B.S. Graduates

Job Placement and Graduate Work for B.S. Graduates

 LBC Alumni indicated they performed a much higher amount of “unpaid community service or volunteer time” to non-profit or charitable organizations. 64.5% of LBC Alumni said they spent more than 10 hours per month with “unpaid community service or volunteer time.” This was at least 26.2% higher than any of the other comparison groups.

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