Top PDF Harry Ludens: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone as a Novel and Computer Game

Harry Ludens: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone as a Novel and Computer Game

Harry Ludens: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone as a Novel and Computer Game

go by, Harry and his friends feel that there is something going on, some- thing dangerous and signifi cant. They put two and two together and eventually come to the conclusion that the Philosopher’s Stone is hid- den from the evil Lord Voldemort somewhere at Hogwarts. The stone produces the Elixir of Life which makes whoever drinks it immortal. Unfortunately, Lord Voldemort knows this, and he wants the Stone desperately, since the elixir would enable him to leave a state of “[m]ere shadow and vapour” (213) and create a body of his own. This has to be prevented at all costs. One day when Professor Dumbledore is away from the school, Harry and his friends realize that Lord Voldemort is coming to try to steal the stone and they understand that it is up to them to save it. In the end, Harry alone stands up to the great evil and manages to hold the fort until Dumbledore comes to his rescue. The semester at Hogwarts ends in triumph when Dumbledore awards extra house points to Harry and his friends for saving the stone, which means that the Gryffi ndor house wins the House Cup. Harry is happier than ever: “It was the best evening of Harry’s life, better than winning at Quidditch or Christmas or knocking out mountain trolls … he would never, ever forget tonight.” (222) Even so, summer holiday is coming up and everybody has to leave Hogwarts to go home to their families. The last part of the novel takes place at Kings Cross Station where Uncle Vernon, unpleasant as ever, comes to pick Harry up. The novel consists of seventeen chapters. The fi rst six, approximately 35 % of the novel, take place before Harry’s arrival at Hogwarts, while the following eleven chapters depict Harry’s life at Hogwarts. Generally, the chapters are named after an event, person, or place that is central to the chapter in question. For instance, in “The Journey from Platform Nine and Three-Quarters,” Harry takes the train from Kings Cross Station, while in “Diagon Alley,” Hagrid brings Harry to that street to purchase school supplies. In “The Man with Two Faces,” Harry encounters Lord Voldemort and fi nds out which of the teachers has been running this man’s errands.
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Harry Potter and metaphysical hospitality

Harry Potter and metaphysical hospitality

Despite attempts to give the books spurious deeper meanings, since the publication of the irst novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in 1997, the books have gained immense popularity, critical acclaim and commercial success worldwide, leading to ilms, video games, theme parks and merchandise. he seven books published have collectively sold more than 325m copies and have been translated into more than 64 languages, including Ancient Greek and Latin.22 he seventh and last book in the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was released in July 2007. Publishers announced a record-breaking 12m copies for the irst print run in the us alone.23 Reputedly, the success of the novels has made J K Rowling the highest-earn- ing novelist in history.24
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Tensions between didacticism, entertainment and translatorial
practices: deletion and omission in the Arabic translations of Harry Potter

Tensions between didacticism, entertainment and translatorial practices: deletion and omission in the Arabic translations of Harry Potter

This fantasy series consists of seven books published between 1997 and 2007. It begins with Harry as an infant, who is left in the care of his ‘Muggle’, or non-magical, relatives, Aunt Petunia and Uncle Vernon. In Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (1997), Harry joins Hogwarts boarding School of Witchcraft and Wizardry as a first-year student at the age of eleven; here he meets his friends Ron and Hermione. The second book, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (1998), follows Harry’s struggle to save Ginny, who is kidnapped and taken into the Chamber of Secrets by Lord Voldemort. The third novel, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (1999), follows Harry’s third year in the school, where he meets some faithful old friends of his parents, including Sirius Black, and some traitors who betrayed his family, such as Peter Pettigrew, who was Lord Voldemort’s servant. In his fourth year at Hogwarts, in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2000), Harry takes part in a dangerous competition called the Triwizard Tournament; by the end of this book Lord Voldemort has regained his full strength. In his fifth year at Hogwarts, in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2003), Harry and his friends encounter and nearly defeat Lord Voldemort’s Death Eaters. In the sixth book, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2005), Harry discovers that Voldemort became immortal through his creation of six ‘horcruxes’ where parts of his soul are kept within objects. Two of these horcruxes have been destroyed: one by Harry in the events of the Chamber of Secrets and the other by Dumbledore, Hogwarts’ headmaster, before the events of Half-Blood Prince. The final book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007), follows Harry’s development and maturation to the age of 17. With the help of his friends and supporters, Harry finally defeats Lord Voldemort and his followers and saves the wizard world.
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Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references 
Harry Potter movies in arabic

Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references Harry Potter movies in arabic

This is an important category, as it is rarely possible to find a children’s work, either literary books or audiovisual material, without these cultural elements. These references provide the target audience with more details and better understanding of the source culture. According to Klingberg (ibid: 36), when cultural context adaptation is thought to be necessary, more explanation can be added when possibble. From his point of view, children are interested in detailed descriptions of food of other cultures and that reading about what children eat and drink in a different culture might raise the interest of the target children. Hence, Klingberg gives the translator the freedom to use more words if needed to describe the food and drink references. For example, Klingberg (ibid: 38) argues that replacing ‘knäckebröd med mesost’ (crispbread with whey-cheese) by the generic ‘cheese’ in Maria Cripe’s The Night Daddy is not a good idea since the dish is very typically Swedish. Thus, explanation is needed in such case. Since Harry Potter movies include similar references, more examples will be investigated in the analytical section of this thesis.
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The Tlonic World of Harry Potter: An Idealistic Version of Magical World

The Tlonic World of Harry Potter: An Idealistic Version of Magical World

Considered as literary pieces of fantasy and secondarily a possible version of magic realism, J.K. Rowling’s seven Harry Potter (1997-2007) novels have been involving the readers of different age groups and succeeded in unleashing the target imagination. Taking into account the different probable associations, it is of novelty to draw comparisons between the magical world of Harry Potter (1997-2007) and that of Tlon in Jorge Luis Borges’ short story “Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis, Tertius" (1941). In both worlds there exist images and implied notions that serve to naturalize the supernatural and to blur the line between the real and the imaginary. Making use of Berkeleyan theory of idealism, the power of mind is emphasized upon due to its capability of bringing into existence any object, concept or incident that seems materially and logically impossible. Meanwhile, an abstract force that is Love is highlighted in the novels that could be assumed as functioning like the omniscient God of Berkeley holding the universe together with its mere presence. Therefore, a new perspective in discovering a truth of life would be dragged into view as a result of the products of one’s mind.
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Harry Potter and the Action Prediction Challenge from Natural Language

Harry Potter and the Action Prediction Challenge from Natural Language

To diminish the impact of random seeds and local minima in neural networks, results are averaged across 5 runs. 8 ‘Base’ is a majority-class model that maps everything to ‘Avada Kedavra’, the most common action in the training set. This helps test whether the models predict above chance perfor- mance. When using short snippets (size=32), dis- parate models such as our MLR , MLP and LSTM s achieve a similar performance. As the snippet size is increased, the LSTM -based approach shows a

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Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references 
Harry Potter movies in arabic

Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references Harry Potter movies in arabic

There are more magical creatures that have names which reflect their characteristics. For example, the term ‘Animagus’ refers to a very powerful wizard who can turn into an animal at will. The term is a combination of the word animal and the Latin word magus, meaning ‘animal wizard’. Other mythological creatures presented in Harry Potter movies are the ‘Cornish pixies’. They are small and bright blue creatures that are able to fly. Although Pixies are variously described in folklore and fiction, the etymology and origin of the name is uncertain and there is no direct ancestor of the word ‘pixies’. In the snapshot (41) below, the term ‘Animagus’ is preserved in the Arabic subtitle and transliterated as ‘سوغامينأ’. It is quite clear that the transliteration of the term would not be an obstacle for the target audience to understand the nature of the creature, because the term is explained by Hermione in the whole subtitle. However, some of the effect is lost because the target audience do not know the origin of the term and that it is a combination of two words.
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Frazer, Wittgenstein and Harry Potter: an approach to the ritual manipulation of images

Frazer, Wittgenstein and Harry Potter: an approach to the ritual manipulation of images

I want to suggest that Harry Potter can help to focus the issue. I have in mind the episode at the opening of the second book in the series, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. As usual, the book opens in the household of the Dursley family, Harry's unwilling guardians. An argument has broken out about the nocturnal disturbances created by Harry's owl, but the thread is broken by his cousin Dudley's demands for more bacon for his breakfast. He tells Harry to pass the frying pan and Harry replies «You've forgotten the magic word». The result is uproar in the household and Harry quickly clarifies «I meant "please"!», but it takes some time for the fuss to die down 25 . In the context of the book this is simply a joke, playing on Harry's ability to do «real» magic and the conventional English witticism naming «please» a «magic» word. But I want to suggest that it is a productive passage. The rituals of human societies, including the image rituals of Giuliano Guizzelmi, are much more like saying «please» than they are like the magic of Rowling's wizards. Indeed, as I have argued
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What has Harry Potter done for me?:children's reflections on their 'Potter experience'

What has Harry Potter done for me?:children's reflections on their 'Potter experience'

achievements, press headlines such as “Potter’s magic spell turns boys into bookworms” (Smith, 2005) and “The Harry Potter effect: how one wizard hooked boys on reading” (Laucius, 2007) make it appear that J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series has transformed children’s reading. These examples also highlight how media concerns about children’s literacy are gendered, focusing chiefly on boys. It is assumed in academia that boys are less enthusiastic readers than girls—. As international datasets highlight, this may translate into boys’ lower attainments than girls on measures of literacy (OECD, 2014; Moss, 2007). In the UK, early concerns about boys’ literacies intersected with anxieties about their overall educational accomplishments around the same time that Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Rowling, 1997) was published and widely taken up (see Hutchison, 2004; Jackson, 2003; Shepherd, 2011; Zyngier, 2009).
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Portraying the Protagonists: A Study of the Use of Adjectives in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Portraying the Protagonists: A Study of the Use of Adjectives in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Thus, the present study was conducted to gauge the validity of whether character portrayal in the Harry Potter series could be the main reason in seizing the readers’ attention instead of marketing techniques done by global corporations. This study is done by analyzing three main protagonists in the final novel of the Harry Potter series which is the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. It incorporates two concepts which is stylistic analysis and corpus analysis, where the corpora of the final Harry Potter novel is analyzed based on these two approaches to study one linguistic feature, which is adjectives that was used by Rowling in describing the three main protagonists in the final novel. The results of the adjectives analyzed are then categorized into three smaller segments for easier scrutiny which are features, emotions and traits. Finally, from these results, the researcher analyzeswether the usage of the frequently recurring adjective could contribute to the depiction of protagonist as heroic characters.
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AN ANALYSIS OF SPEECH ACT USED IN HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE MOVIE

AN ANALYSIS OF SPEECH ACT USED IN HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE MOVIE

There are some genres of movie namely action, adventure, animated, comedies, drama, tragedies, family, horror, romantic, thrillers, fantasy, etc. Based on its history, the first movie commercially published in 1895 and nowadays there were lots of movies have been produced. In this study, the researcher interested to analyze speech act used in a fantasy movie entitled Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire movie was published in 2005 which directed by Mike Newell and produced by Warner Bros. Pictures. This movie was the fourth sequel of the Harry Potter movie series which is actually adapted from J.K. Rowling’s novel with the same title. The script of this movie is written by Steve Kloves.
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Understanding Racism and Sexism in Harry Potter and Stuart Hall’s Model of Three Reading Positions

Understanding Racism and Sexism in Harry Potter and Stuart Hall’s Model of Three Reading Positions

“Males are represented more often, but they are also depicted as wiser, braver, more powerful, and more fun than females” (ibid.). Female powerlessness is most evident in the portrayal of Hermione, who often shows signs of fear. As an example Heilman cites the attack of the mountain troll when the boys have to save Hermione because she is merely crouching helplessly under the sink and screaming (Rowling 1999, 132). Heilman argues, somewhat inaccurately, that Hermione is supposed to be exceptionally intelligent, but not brave or daring. Further, her knowledge is only of use to the boys while she does not know how to use it or cannot use it. This can be explained through the understanding of Harry Potter as a mythic hero. Both Hermione and Ron are only helping Harry since he is the principal protagonist of the story (Nikolajeva 2003, 127). Although Heilman draws attention to such instances as the Polyjuice Potion which helps the boys to sneak into the Slytherin House, it does not work on Hermione so she has to stay behind; or when Hermione becomes ‘petrified’ but still manages to aid Harry and Ron with the help of a note in her hand which reveals the secret of Salazar’s successor. It is important to stress that in the final battle Harry always fights alone because Ron also fails half way. This happens at the end of each book: in The Philosopher’s Stone Ron sacrifices himself on the chessboard and Harry confronts Squirrel alone; in The Chamber of Secrets the ceiling of the tunnel collapses and Ron remains trapped; in The Prisoner of Azkaban Hermione helps Harry rescue Black and Buckbeak while Ron rests injured in the infirmary; in The Goblet of Fire Harry confronts Lord Voldemort while Ron and Hermione watch the competition from the stands for the spectators; in The Order of Phoenix Harry has several helpers, among them Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Neville, and Luna; in the sixth book, The Half-Blood Prince, Ron and Hermione stay at Hogwarts while Harry joins Dumbledore in his search for a part of Lord Voldemort’s soul. Another proof of Hermione’s bravery and daring is the scene in The Chamber of Secrets when she tries to convince the boys they should make the Polyjuice Potion:
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Itwasthemiddleofthemorning.docx

Itwasthemiddleofthemorning.docx

As soon as I saw you I knew you were against them.' Them, it appeared, meant the Party, and above all the Inner Party, about whom she talked with an open jeering hatred which made Wins[r]

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NortonMLAdocumentation.pdf

NortonMLAdocumentation.pdf

Harry S. Truman and the Election of 1948 “Thomas E. Dewey’s Election as President Is a Foregone Conclusion,” read a headline in the New York Times during the presidential election race between incumbent Democrat Harry S. Truman and his Republican challenger, Thomas E. Dewey. Earlier, Life magazine had put Dewey on its cover with the caption “The Next President of the United States” (qtd. in “1948 Truman-Dewey Election”). In a Newsweek survey of fifty prominent political writers, each one predicted Truman’s defeat, and Time correspondents declared that Dewey would carry 39 of the 48 states (Donaldson 210). Nearly every major media outlet across the United States endorsed Dewey and lambasted Truman. As historian Robert H. Ferrell observes, even Truman’s wife, Bess, thought he would be beaten (270).
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[V314.Ebook] Ebook Download Discovering Philosophy Portfolio Edition 2nd Edition By Thomas I White.pdf

[V314.Ebook] Ebook Download Discovering Philosophy Portfolio Edition 2nd Edition By Thomas I White.pdf

The new Portfolio Edition draws on popular culture, from Harry Potter to “The Matrix.” It includes basic elements of symbolic logic, informal fallacies, discussions of ethical relativism, and string theory, fuller discussions of Kant, and of democracy as a value, and a questionnaire for students based on Mill’s idea that there are qualitative differences in pleasures and pains.

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The currency of heroic fantasy : The Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter from ideology to industry : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English at Massey University

The currency of heroic fantasy : The Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter from ideology to industry : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English at Massey University

“Don’t you understand? If Snape gets hold of the Stone, Voldemort’s coming back! Haven’t you heard what it was like when he was trying to take over? There won’t be any Hogwarts to get expelled from! He’ll flatten it, or turn it into a school for the Dark Arts! Losing points doesn’t matter any more, can’t you see? D’you think he’ll leave you and your families alone if Gryffindor win the house cup? It I get caught before I can get to the stone, well, I’ll have to go back to the Dursleys and wait for Voldemort to find me there. It’s only dying a bit later than I would have done, because I’m never going over to the Dark Side! I’m going through that trapdoor tonight and nothing you two say is going to stop me! Voldemort killed my parents, remember?” (HPPS 197)
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Mixing memory and desire: recollecting the self in Harry Potter and His Dark Materials : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in English at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

Mixing memory and desire: recollecting the self in Harry Potter and His Dark Materials : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in English at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

The voyage to the world of the dead is the most frightening expedition that the children make in the story, and one that is rarely undertaken in children‟s literature. Pullman‟s narrative indicates to the reader that it is possible that Will and Lyra will not return, even though this would be breaking with the fantasy tradition of the heroes and heroines either returning to their environments or going somewhere infinitely better. The price that the children must pay is to leave their individual souls behind. Will is unaware of his dæmon, but Lyra has to undergo a separation so wrenching that some critics have questioned whether this is appropriate for a children‟s book. However, as I maintain throughout this thesis, it is the fact that Pullman and Rowling respect the emotional, physical and intellectual potential of young people which contributes greatly to the appeal of these texts. As writers, Rowling and Pullman expect their readers to make a leap in understanding and acquire emotional strength, just as the novels‟ protagonists do. “Children who make the intellectual journey in reading Pullman gain substantial education through … rich though noncondescending storyline[s]” (Smith 145) and I would include Harry Potter in this category also. Thus our collective memory of the monomyth and its derivatives continues.
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The Harry Potter Effect: Understanding the Crossover Appeal of Bestselling  Young Adult Literature

The Harry Potter Effect: Understanding the Crossover Appeal of Bestselling Young Adult Literature

Harry, Lyra, and Bella are incredibly likable characters and very easy to identify with, because, despite their unique attributes and fates, they are normal kids. Harry is skinny and short and wears glasses; his hair sticks up all over the place. He would probably be called a nerd (Tucker, 1999, pg. 227). But Harry is also “a boy’s boy” (Maguire, 1999) who doesn’t tend to excel in his classes but is quite talented at, and entirely preoccupied by, the wizarding world’s most popular sport, Quidditch. Lyra’s childhood is “an unbroken series of small adventures, hair-raising exploits, and minor wars among the local tribes of Oxford’s children,” (Chabon, 2004, pg. 26). Lyra is a girl who can’t be bothered to keep clean and who knows how to lie with aplomb; she has, Michael Chabon writes, “a complexity of character,” that is unusual for works of
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Permanent Functions of Characters’ Proper Names in Harry Potter

Permanent Functions of Characters’ Proper Names in Harry Potter

Muriel to Barny (Harry), Mr Dumberton - Mrs Cole to Dumbledore, Dunderbore - Mrs Cole to Dumbledore, Miss Grant - Professor Binns to Hermione, Ralph and Rupert - Slughorn to Ron, Peter Weasley - Draco to Percy Weasley, Weatherby - Crouch to Percy Weasley, Arnold Weasley - Rita Skeeter about Arthur Weasley, Weezly - Quidditch World Cup organizers who made a campsite reservation for Arthur Weasley, O’Flaherty - Professor Binns to Seamus Finnigan, Miss Pennyfeather - Professor Binns to Parvati Patil, Bibble and Buggins - Luna about Cadwallader while commentating on a Quidditch match, and Blinky - Percy about Winky. An opposite situation occurs only once: Harry, Ron and Hermione want to know a wizard’s name, but they do not, finally their need to be able to refer to him prompts Harry to name the man Mr Magical Maintenance, which is based on the only piece of information about the man the three friends possess. Next, the social superiority may be said to be expressed or suggested by thirteen names. The first six simply contain titles: Sir Cadogan, Sir Nicholas de Mimsy-Porpington, The Bloody Baron, Sir Patrick Delaney-Podmore, Dr Filibuster and Lord Voldemort. The next five suggest their owners’ belief in their social superiority due to the language they originate in, namely Latin – which was undoubtedly of unique significance within the wizarding world – Lucius Malfoy, Narcissa Malfoy, Draco Malfoy, Scorpius, and Voldemort. The last confirms that for people aspiring to a higher social status Latin is one of the means to achieve it – as Voldemort chooses his new name for himself abandoning his English based one: Tom Riddle. The last two nomina propria expressing social superiority of their bearer are created by Peeves, a poltergeist spreading mischief and chaos, who has respect for only one wizard: Albus Dumbledore, whom he does not dare insult and addresses: Your Headship and Professorhead. The last four sociological characters’ names were created to mark the namers’ believed social inferiority of the denoted characters. These are: the Weasel - created by Draco to address Ron, Little Miss Question-all - by Umbridge to Hermione, Miss Prissy and Little Miss Perfect - by Skeeter to Hermione.
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Harry Potter   Rowling, J K   Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets pdf

Harry Potter Rowling, J K Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets pdf

The rest of Harry's Christmas presents were far more satisfactory. Hagrid had sent him a large tin of treacle fudge, which Harry decided to soften by the fire before eating; Ron had given him a book called Flying with the Cannons, a book of interesting facts about his favorite Quidditch team, and Hermione had bought him a luxury eagle-feather quill. Harry opened the last present to find a new, hand-knitted sweater from Mrs. Weasley and a large plum cake. He read her card with a fresh surge of guilt, thinking about Mr. Weasley's car (which hadn't been seen since its crash with the Whomping Willow), and the bout of rule-breaking he and Ron were planning next.
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