Top PDF Harry Potter Rowling, J K Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone pdf

Harry Potter   Rowling, J K   Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone pdf

Harry Potter Rowling, J K Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone pdf

Harry heard the hat shout the last word to the whole hall. He took off the hat and walked shakily toward the Gryffindor table. He was so relieved to have been chosen and not put in Slytherin, he hardly noticed that he was getting the loudest cheer yet. Percy the Prefect got up and shook his hand vigorously, while the Weasley twins yelled, "We got Potter! We got Potter!" Harry sat down opposite the ghost in the ruff he'd seen earlier. The ghost patted his arm, giving Harry the sudden, horrible feeling he'd just plunged it into a bucket of ice-cold water. He could see the High Table properly now. At the end nearest him sat Hagrid, who caught his eye and gave him the thumbs up. Harry grinned back. And there, in the center of the High Table, in a large gold chair, sat Albus Dumbledore. Harry recognized him at once from the card he'd gotten out of the Chocolate Frog on the train. Dumbledore's silver hair was the only thing in the whole hall that shone as brightly as the
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Harry Potter   Rowling, J K   Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban pdf

Harry Potter Rowling, J K Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban pdf

Ron and Herinione watched Harry nervously all through dintier, not daring to talk about what they'd overheard, because Percy was sitting close by them. When they went upstairs to the crowded common room, it was to find Fred and George had set off half a dozen Dungbombs in a fit of end- of-term high spirits. Harry, who didn't want Fred and George asking him whether he'd reached Hogsmeade or not, sneaked quietly up to the empty dormitory and headed straight for his bedside cabinet. He pushed his books aside and quickly found what he was looking for -- the leather-bound photo album Hagrid had given him two years ago, which was full of wizard pictures of his mother and father. He sat down on his bed, drew the hangings around him, and started turning the pages, searching, until...
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Harry Potter   Rowling, J K   Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire   Book 4 pdf

Harry Potter Rowling, J K Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Book 4 pdf

The portrait swung forward to reveal a hole in the wall through which they all climbed. A crackling fire warmed the circular common room, which was full of squashy armchairs and tables. Hermione cast the merrily dancing flames a dark look, and Harry distinctly heard her mutter "Slave labor" before bidding them good night and disappearing through the doorway to the girls' dormitory. Harry, Ron, and Neville climbed up the last, spiral staircase until they reached their own dormitory, which was situated at the top of the tower. Five four-poster beds with deep crimson hangings stood against the walls, each with its owner's trunk at the foot. Dean and Seamus were already getting into bed; Seamus had pinned his Ireland rosette to his headboard, and Dean had tacked up a poster of Viktor Krum over his bedside table. His old poster of the West Ham football team was pinned right next to it.
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Harry Potter   Rowling, J K   Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets pdf

Harry Potter Rowling, J K Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets pdf

The rest of Harry's Christmas presents were far more satisfactory. Hagrid had sent him a large tin of treacle fudge, which Harry decided to soften by the fire before eating; Ron had given him a book called Flying with the Cannons, a book of interesting facts about his favorite Quidditch team, and Hermione had bought him a luxury eagle-feather quill. Harry opened the last present to find a new, hand-knitted sweater from Mrs. Weasley and a large plum cake. He read her card with a fresh surge of guilt, thinking about Mr. Weasley's car (which hadn't been seen since its crash with the Whomping Willow), and the bout of rule-breaking he and Ron were planning next.
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“We Are Only as Strong as We Are United, as Weak as We Are Divided” a Dynamic Analysis of the Peer Support Networks in the Harry Potter Books

“We Are Only as Strong as We Are United, as Weak as We Are Divided” a Dynamic Analysis of the Peer Support Networks in the Harry Potter Books

A second limitation of this study is related to the method being used. As was proposed by De Nooy 14, this study made use of a fictional story to address the development of enacted peer support during adolescence. Nonetheless, studying social theories based on stories also has its disadvantages. For example, the data for the study completely depended on what J. K. Rowling showed us of the world of Harry Potter. The story focuses on the life of Harry and his friends, and a lot less is known of the interactions of the side characters. Therefore, real ob- servations in network perspective, with multiple ob- servers for simultaneous observations, would possibly generate a much broader and detailed view on the devel- opment of peer support. However, this often remains an ideal situation, a utopia for which we all strive.
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The crucifixion of consumerism and power and the resurrection of a community glimpsed through  Meylahn’s wounded Christ in conversation with Rowling’s Christ discourse in the  Harry Potter  series

The crucifixion of consumerism and power and the resurrection of a community glimpsed through Meylahn’s wounded Christ in conversation with Rowling’s Christ discourse in the Harry Potter series

Blake (2002:71–72) points out that Harry, regardless of being ‘wizard cloaked and wand in hand’, is like any other contemporary kid, as he desires ‘the pleasure of retail’, like wanting the latest broomstick. Harry’s desire for the latest broomstick makes him human, and adolescents can easily identify with Harry wanting something. However, he never puts material wants over any friendship and would rather have friendship than money. Harry always shares his money and material things with his friends. On his first train ride to Hogwarts, he is thrilled to have someone, Ron, to share the food that he buys from the trolley: ‘It was a nice feeling, sitting there with Ron, eating their way through all Harry’s pasties and cakes’ (Rowling 1997:76). Harry is happy for the companionship shown to him by Ron. Although Harry has been deprived of both money and friends, he instinctively knows where to place value. Harry also chooses to be friends with Ron, rather than Draco, whom Harry immediately recognises as a bully who likes people with influence, having had lots of experience with his cousin Dudley (Rowling 1997:81). Now, Harry has true companionship through Ron, something that cannot be bought. Adolescents experience Harry’s delight at finding money and friends. They also experience the importance of the ‘joy’ of having friends over having money and desirable objects. Through expressing joy in their stories, writers, Tolkien (2008:246) tells us, allow the reader to experience ‘source-reality’ (Christ). Therefore, through the joy of Harry finding companionship, the reader also glimpses Christ and the friendship and companionship that comes from knowing Christ: through a friendship a person can experience the joy of Christ.
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The Role of Girls as Mothers in Harry Potter Series

The Role of Girls as Mothers in Harry Potter Series

When we are talking about fantasy genre, the first thing that comes to mind is the Harry Potter series. Harry Potter series started in 1997, and it received much more attention after its first (out of eight) film adaptation was released in 2001. The films’ popularity only caused the fandom to grow even bigger. In 2014, as recorded by Scholastic, the books have been translated to 68 languages (―Meet Author J.K. Rowling,‖ n.d.). Fans’ enthusiasm was beyond explosive that bookstores started to hold pre-order events that allowed fans to order the book before it was released. This method turned out to be a huge success, with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows breaking the pre-order record. It managed to reach 1.000.000 copies of orders during its pre-order week (―Potter Pre-orders Smash All Records,‖ 2007). Now, pre-order system has become a routine for best-selling series. This series tells the story of an 11 year-old wizard named Harry who has to kill Lord Voldemort, his biggest enemy, in order to save the magic world from evil. Throughout his adventure, Harry meets many obstacles, from the constant attack from Voldemort and his followers to the death of his loved ones. With the help of his close friends like Hermione Granger, Ron Weasley, Luna Lovegood, Neville Longbottom, and also his future wife Ginny Weasley, Harry is able to beat Voldemort and brings peace to the magic world.
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Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Regarding Elder Abuse

Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Regarding Elder Abuse

how these things happen. The wand chooses the wizard, remember…I think we must expect great things from you, Mr. Potter…After all, He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named did great things – terrible, yes, but great” (Sorcerer’s 85). Ollivander looks for a parallel between Harry’s and Voldemort’s lives, having made their wands and knowing that their wands’ cores both contain phoenix feathers from the same bird. Harry’s wand appears to access or to understand Harry’s future potential, a potential also recognized by Voldemort’s wand, and in recognizing this potential, it chooses him. Sarah Gibbons remarks that the wand’s choice demonstrates a relationship between wand and wizard: “Harry does not choose the wand with the phoenix feather, it instead chooses him. Like any traditional hero, or any consumer within a constructed market, Harry has a reciprocal relationship with his destiny” (93). Gibbons supports both fate and free will, for “reciprocal relationship” suggests that both choice and destiny are at work in Harry’s life. Hermione then reminds Harry (and readers) of this reciprocal relationship when she coyly informs Harry, “Wands are only as powerful as the wizards who use them. Some wizards just like to boast that theirs are bigger and better than other people’s” (Deathly 415). The wand may choose the wizard from some knowledge of the wizard’s future, but the wizard’s strength and ability limit the wand’s power. Once again, both fate and free will work in Harry’s life and world.
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What has Harry Potter done for me?:children's reflections on their 'Potter experience'

What has Harry Potter done for me?:children's reflections on their 'Potter experience'

achievements, press headlines such as “Potter’s magic spell turns boys into bookworms” (Smith, 2005) and “The Harry Potter effect: how one wizard hooked boys on reading” (Laucius, 2007) make it appear that J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series has transformed children’s reading. These examples also highlight how media concerns about children’s literacy are gendered, focusing chiefly on boys. It is assumed in academia that boys are less enthusiastic readers than girls—. As international datasets highlight, this may translate into boys’ lower attainments than girls on measures of literacy (OECD, 2014; Moss, 2007). In the UK, early concerns about boys’ literacies intersected with anxieties about their overall educational accomplishments around the same time that Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Rowling, 1997) was published and widely taken up (see Hutchison, 2004; Jackson, 2003; Shepherd, 2011; Zyngier, 2009).
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Narrative Brought to Life: The Wizarding World of Harry Potter

Narrative Brought to Life: The Wizarding World of Harry Potter

Rowling was involved with this process. For her, one of the most important narrative experiences was Ollivanders wand shop. Ollivanders is where Harry receives his first wand and so begins his journey of becoming a wizard. To create a sense of authenticity, Rowling believed that the wand choosing experience should be included in the theme park and adhere to the experience that many fans would already know from the fiction. 65 Coup emphasized the important role Rowling played in the decision making process, since the experience at the park needed to stay true to what fans already know in order to avoid the dilution of the experience. While Rowling’s involvement in the park helped to create an “authentic” space, in some senses it also limits the patron’s imagination. This is inevitable since those working on the project had to agree on a look and style, even if doing so tends to restrict the ways in which readers/visitors conceptualize the space in their own minds. Although the narrative tells us that Ollivanders wand shop is in Diagon Alley, which is in London and not Hogsmeade village, Rowling gave the park special permission to have an Ollivanders wand shop in Hogsmeade, since the books never actually stipulate that the only Ollivanders is the one in Diagon Alley. Furthermore, they agreed that it would be reasonable for a wizarding village to have its own wand shop. 66
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Understanding Racism and Sexism in Harry Potter and Stuart Hall’s Model of Three Reading Positions

Understanding Racism and Sexism in Harry Potter and Stuart Hall’s Model of Three Reading Positions

“Males are represented more often, but they are also depicted as wiser, braver, more powerful, and more fun than females” (ibid.). Female powerlessness is most evident in the portrayal of Hermione, who often shows signs of fear. As an example Heilman cites the attack of the mountain troll when the boys have to save Hermione because she is merely crouching helplessly under the sink and screaming (Rowling 1999, 132). Heilman argues, somewhat inaccurately, that Hermione is supposed to be exceptionally intelligent, but not brave or daring. Further, her knowledge is only of use to the boys while she does not know how to use it or cannot use it. This can be explained through the understanding of Harry Potter as a mythic hero. Both Hermione and Ron are only helping Harry since he is the principal protagonist of the story (Nikolajeva 2003, 127). Although Heilman draws attention to such instances as the Polyjuice Potion which helps the boys to sneak into the Slytherin House, it does not work on Hermione so she has to stay behind; or when Hermione becomes ‘petrified’ but still manages to aid Harry and Ron with the help of a note in her hand which reveals the secret of Salazar’s successor. It is important to stress that in the final battle Harry always fights alone because Ron also fails half way. This happens at the end of each book: in The Philosopher’s Stone Ron sacrifices himself on the chessboard and Harry confronts Squirrel alone; in The Chamber of Secrets the ceiling of the tunnel collapses and Ron remains trapped; in The Prisoner of Azkaban Hermione helps Harry rescue Black and Buckbeak while Ron rests injured in the infirmary; in The Goblet of Fire Harry confronts Lord Voldemort while Ron and Hermione watch the competition from the stands for the spectators; in The Order of Phoenix Harry has several helpers, among them Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Neville, and Luna; in the sixth book, The Half-Blood Prince, Ron and Hermione stay at Hogwarts while Harry joins Dumbledore in his search for a part of Lord Voldemort’s soul. Another proof of Hermione’s bravery and daring is the scene in The Chamber of Secrets when she tries to convince the boys they should make the Polyjuice Potion:
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Humour loss in the Indonesian translation of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Humour loss in the Indonesian translation of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

be particularly useful. We also use Incongruity Theory, a widely accepted theory of humour that states that humour is created out of a conflict between what is expected and what actually happens. It is a theory whose origins go back as far as Aristotle, who defined humour as “something bad”, which was interpreted as “something unbefitting, out of place.” Kant (1790, p. 177 quoted in Attardo, 1994) defined laughter as “an affection arising from sudden transformation of a strained expectation into nothing”, and Schopenhauer explicitly mentions incongruity as a cause of laughter (Raskin, 1985, p. 31). Incongruity Theory assumes that the cognitive capacity to note and understand incongruous events is necessary in order to experience laughter or mirth. People laugh at things that are unexpected or surprising; it is the violation of an expected pattern that provokes humour in the mind of the receiver. Absurdity, nonsense and surprise are vital themes in humour covered by this theory. Berger adds that incongruity covers many meanings: “inconsistent, not harmonious, lacking propriety and not conforming” (1993, p. 3). Within the research on incongruity in humour there has emerged a debate between those who believe that incongruity alone is enough to produce humour and those who maintain that incongruity in itself is not enough, that one has to ‘resolve’ the incongruity in order to find it funny (Forabosco, 1992). Our view, concurring with Attardo (1994, p. 144) is that a humorous text will have “an element of incongruity and an element of resolution” and that the resolution can be playful rather than realistic or plausible. This is the case in the Harry Potter stories. Furthermore, as mentioned above, magic – unexpected and unaccountable things happening – also relies on incongruity for effect.
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Tensions between didacticism, entertainment and translatorial
practices: deletion and omission in the Arabic translations of Harry Potter

Tensions between didacticism, entertainment and translatorial practices: deletion and omission in the Arabic translations of Harry Potter

This fantasy series consists of seven books published between 1997 and 2007. It begins with Harry as an infant, who is left in the care of his ‘Muggle’, or non-magical, relatives, Aunt Petunia and Uncle Vernon. In Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (1997), Harry joins Hogwarts boarding School of Witchcraft and Wizardry as a first-year student at the age of eleven; here he meets his friends Ron and Hermione. The second book, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (1998), follows Harry’s struggle to save Ginny, who is kidnapped and taken into the Chamber of Secrets by Lord Voldemort. The third novel, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (1999), follows Harry’s third year in the school, where he meets some faithful old friends of his parents, including Sirius Black, and some traitors who betrayed his family, such as Peter Pettigrew, who was Lord Voldemort’s servant. In his fourth year at Hogwarts, in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2000), Harry takes part in a dangerous competition called the Triwizard Tournament; by the end of this book Lord Voldemort has regained his full strength. In his fifth year at Hogwarts, in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2003), Harry and his friends encounter and nearly defeat Lord Voldemort’s Death Eaters. In the sixth book, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2005), Harry discovers that Voldemort became immortal through his creation of six ‘horcruxes’ where parts of his soul are kept within objects. Two of these horcruxes have been destroyed: one by Harry in the events of the Chamber of Secrets and the other by Dumbledore, Hogwarts’ headmaster, before the events of Half-Blood Prince. The final book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007), follows Harry’s development and maturation to the age of 17. With the help of his friends and supporters, Harry finally defeats Lord Voldemort and his followers and saves the wizard world.
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Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone Excerpts.docx

Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone Excerpts.docx

    Harry suddenly realized that the tape measure, which was measuring between his nostrils, was doing this on its own. Mr. Ollivander was flitting around the shelves, taking down boxes.     "That will do," he said, and the tape measure crumpled into a heap on the floor. "Right then, Mr. Potter. Try this one. Beechwood and dragon heartstring. Nine inches. Nice and flexible. just take it and give it a wave."

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Harry Potter and metaphysical hospitality

Harry Potter and metaphysical hospitality

Despite attempts to give the books spurious deeper meanings, since the publication of the irst novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in 1997, the books have gained immense popularity, critical acclaim and commercial success worldwide, leading to ilms, video games, theme parks and merchandise. he seven books published have collectively sold more than 325m copies and have been translated into more than 64 languages, including Ancient Greek and Latin.22 he seventh and last book in the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was released in July 2007. Publishers announced a record-breaking 12m copies for the irst print run in the us alone.23 Reputedly, the success of the novels has made J K Rowling the highest-earn- ing novelist in history.24
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The currency of heroic fantasy : The Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter from ideology to industry : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English at Massey University

The currency of heroic fantasy : The Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter from ideology to industry : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English at Massey University

Hermione and her mentor Minerva McGonagall insist that the gift be treated with caution. They rightly suspect the stick is from Sirius Black who is believed at that time to be plotting to kill Harry; any present, therefore, could endanger the young wizard. Within the wizarding world the risk of being hurt by a gift is an accepted possibility. In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Mr Weasley remonstrates with his daughter for using what turns out to be Voldemort’s childhood diary: “Haven’t I taught you anything? What have I always told you? Never trust anything that can think for itself if you can’t see where it keeps its brain … A suspicious object like that, it was clearly full of dark magic!” (242-3, italics in original). Material objects in the wizarding world are much more than
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2016-Potter

2016-Potter

(4) The late Holocene culture, related to northern Athapaskans, has been termed Athapaskan and Taltheilei traditions, Aishihik phase, and/ or Late Prehistoric period (Cooper 2007; Dixon 1985; Shinkwin 1979; Workman 1977, 1978). Associated artifacts include diminutive bifacial Kavik or Klo- kut tanged points, cold- hammered copper points and awls, and a predominance of bone and ant- ler hunting weapons and domestic tools. Important late Holocene components include Healy Lake Village and Garden sites (Cook 1969), Lake Minchumina (Holmes 1986), Nenana River Gorge (Plaskett 1977), Dixthada, Dakah Denin’s Village (Shinkwin 1979), Ringling site (Workman 1976), Birches Site (West 1978) in Alaska and Klo- kut (Morlan 1973), Rat Indian Creek (Le Blanc 1984), KdVo- 5 (MacKay 2008), and Ta’tla Mun (Thomas 2003) in northwest Canada. Cultural historical approaches have limited explanation of key behavioral elements of early Subarctic populations (e.g., settlement systems, land- use strategies), and have resulted in inconsistencies in affiliation of specific sites to cultural constructs, partic- ularly early Holocene nonmicroblade sites like Eroadaway, Carlo Creek, Owl Ridge Component 2, and Jay Creek Ridge (Potter 2011). Alternative strategies, focused on technological organization, behavioral, and ecological approaches, have been more common in recent years (Esdale 2008, 2009; Potter 2005, 2008a, 2008b; Rasic 2011; Wygal 2009, 2011). Potter (2008a, 2008b) held cultural affiliation constant and exam- ined multiple technological and economic variables in 1,000- year intervals in central Alaska, and found major transitions at 6000 and 1000 cal b.p., consistent with middle and late Holocene material culture transitions (Northern Archaic and Athapaskan tra- ditions). Esdale (2009) and Wygal (2009) found that differences in early and middle Holocene technologies related to raw- material access and position of sites within reduc- tion sequences.
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Mixing memory and desire: recollecting the self in Harry Potter and His Dark Materials : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in English at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

Mixing memory and desire: recollecting the self in Harry Potter and His Dark Materials : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in English at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

To be fair to both Todorov and Jackson, when they discuss the differences between the different modes of the fantastic and fantasy they are also very specific about the relatively limited range of texts to which their distinctions apply. These distinctions are also relatively unproblematic when applied to fairly straight forward fairytales. However, they become harder to sustain when applied to longer and more complex narratives, such as novels (especially ones which attempt to give psychological depth to characters, as in Harry Potter and His Dark Materials). Ultimately the only assumption most critics seem to share about fantasy and the fantastic is that they in some sense deal with „the impossible‟, but determining whether a given event is possible or impossible, is loaded with presuppositions about the nature of „reality‟ and how we relate to it. Therefore, I believe that both His Dark Materials and Harry Potter are as mimetic as they are marvellous. These novels, particularly those of Pullman, do imitate an external reality. As mentioned above, it is like a constructed perspective, which is presenting itself as „holding a mirror up to nature‟ in that the writer is trying to show a reflection of reality. There is equivalence between the represented fictional world and the so-called real world outside the text, however it is still constructed. It is the mimetic nature of my chosen texts which contributes to their inability to fit into the traditional fantasy pattern exactly.
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Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references 
Harry Potter movies in arabic

Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references Harry Potter movies in arabic

As mentioned in (5.5.4), the Harry Potter series is filled with enchanted objects, bewitched items and magical devices which are invented by Rowling. Examples of these objects include the most remarkable magic items of them all ‘The Philosopher’s Stone’ and ‘The Resurrection Stone’. Both magical devices are translated literally as ‘فوسليفلا رجح’ and ‘ رجح ثعبلا’ as seen in snapshots below. The same subtitling strategy is applied on the names of other magical devices. For example, Invisibility Cloak ‘ءافخلإا ةءابع’, The Famous Wizard cards ‘ةرحسلا رهشأ تاقاطب’, The Sorting Hat ‘فينصتلا ةعبق’, The Deathly Hallows ‘توملا تاسدقم’, The Elder Wand ‘خيشلا اصع’, Marauder’s Map ‘باهنلا ةطيرخ’ and صوصللا ةطيرخ’ in other occasions, The Goblet of Fire ‘رانلا بوك’ and ‘رانلا سأك’ in other occasions as well.
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[V314.Ebook] Ebook Download Discovering Philosophy Portfolio Edition 2nd Edition By Thomas I White.pdf

[V314.Ebook] Ebook Download Discovering Philosophy Portfolio Edition 2nd Edition By Thomas I White.pdf

The new Portfolio Edition draws on popular culture, from Harry Potter to “The Matrix.” It includes basic elements of symbolic logic, informal fallacies, discussions of ethical relativism, and string theory, fuller discussions of Kant, and of democracy as a value, and a questionnaire for students based on Mill’s idea that there are qualitative differences in pleasures and pains.

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