Top PDF Health and Safety in Canadian Workplaces

Health and Safety in Canadian Workplaces

Health and Safety in Canadian Workplaces

On the surface, this economic perspective appears quite sensible. Every activity does entail some risk. And risk reduction can be very expensive. Nevertheless, workers—those most often injured and killed—tend to see things differently. Workers note that workplace injury is not a natural phenom- enon that no one can control. Rather, the risks workers face reflect decisions employers make—decisions about what, when, where, and how goods and services are produced. Employers make these decisions with the goal of maximizing profitability. In this way, injury is a cost imposed on workers by employers. And allowing employers to do this is a political choice by govern- ment (“the state”). Workers know that the consequence of employers accepting health and safety risks may be injury and death of workers. Reducing injury, disease, and death—not maximizing cost-effectiveness—is the pre-eminent goal of occupational health and safety activities. That is not to say that work- place injuries don’t have economic consequences. Clearly they do. Society must pay for medical treatment. Injured workers cannot earn a living and may lose their houses. Employers profit from dangerous work. But these economic outcomes are secondary effects—by-products of workers being exposed to the risk of injury and death by choices their employers make about production.
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Health and Safety Policy

Health and Safety Policy

All employees will be provided with relevant information regarding the risks to their health and safety as identified by the assessment, including information on the required control measures. Any additional training necessary in the use of safety equipment, personal protective equipment and clothing which may be introduced as a result of the risk assessment must also be provided. Employees involved in conducting risk assessments will be given appropriate training and any additional information applicable to the particular working environment or activities that they may be assessing.
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HEALTH AND SAFETY AT THE WORKPLACE

HEALTH AND SAFETY AT THE WORKPLACE

Workplace hazards can take a variety of forms: chemical, physical, biological, psychological, ergonomic, etc. Due to the multitude of these risks and the fact that many employers neglect health and safety, occupational accidents and diseases are still a serious problem in all regions of the world. Therefore, trade unions must insist that employers fight hazards at the source and do not force workers to adapt to unsafe conditions.

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5th Edition. Food Service Workers Safety Guide. Prepared by the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

5th Edition. Food Service Workers Safety Guide. Prepared by the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

The health and safety legislation requires employees to report hazards to their supervisor. The immediate hazard reporting process allows employees to report hazardous conditions or practices as they notice them. This allows for prompt corrective action without waiting for the next round of regular inspections.

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The Extent of Compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Regulations at Registered Workplaces in Nairobi  S. N. M. Nzuve, Boniface Ayubu Lawrence

The Extent of Compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Regulations at Registered Workplaces in Nairobi S. N. M. Nzuve, Boniface Ayubu Lawrence

Occupational Safety and Health issues have not only become a global concern for employers, workers and national governments, but are also of major concern to managers of organizations. Managers are accountable for any shortcomings at the workplace and therefore recognize that it is in their economic interest to create safe working practices (Bell, 1981) and comply with occupational safety and health regulations. It is estimated that the worker spends about one third of his/her time at the workplace (Sakari, 1991). During this time, he/she is exposed to various hazards including accidents, noise, dust, vibrations, heat and harsh chemicals among others (Kenei, 1995). The Occupational Safety and Health Act (2007) has various provisions for the safety, health and welfare of workers and all persons lawfully present at workplaces in Kenya. The Act has provision for creation of the Directorate of Occupational Health and Safety Services (DOHSS) with the principal objective of promotion and enforcement of occupational safety and health regulations at workplaces. Despite the fact that the Government of Kenya has put in place legislations to safeguard the safety and health of workers, the number of accidents at workplaces has continued to increase (Mutemi, 2005). According to the Directorate of Occupational Health and Safety Services (DOHSS) Annual Report (2008), the cumulative number of accidents reported for years 2001- 2007 for Nairobi province alone was 1,035. These accidents accounted for 12,941 man days lost. This high number of accidents and the attendant losses can be attributed to failure by management at workplaces to comply with the legal and regulatory framework regarding occupational safety and health.
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Safety. Health. Health. fety. Safety. Safety Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Risk Assessmen. essment.

Safety. Health. Health. fety. Safety. Safety Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Safety. Risk Assessmen. essment.

9.5 Non-conformances identified from the point of removal of the waste from the designated collection points to the point of its disposal at a licensed clinical waste incinerator will be reported to the Health and Safety Division. The Biological Sciences Safety Officer can advise departments if any corrective action is required and support the appropriate Departmental Safety Officer or other nominated person(s) and individual workers in implementing the corrective actions within an agreed timescale.

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Environmental Health and Safety. Laser Safety Guide. Environmental Health and Safety

Environmental Health and Safety. Laser Safety Guide. Environmental Health and Safety

The PI or supervisor is responsible for the health and safety of those reporting to him/her. They are also responsible for ensuring that lasers are properly installed and used, laser users have been properly trained, and that their laser installations comply with the goals and requirements of this guide.

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Barriers and facilitators of Canadian quality and safety teams: a mixed-methods study exploring the views of health care leaders

Barriers and facilitators of Canadian quality and safety teams: a mixed-methods study exploring the views of health care leaders

The authors acknowledge grant funding for the work from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (PHE 85201) and Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions (200701285), and in-kind/and or cash contributions from Alberta Health Ser- vices, Canadian Patient Safety Institute, Faculty of Nursing (University of Calgary), Saskatoon Health Region, and Winnipeg Regional Health Authority. They would also like to acknowledge Karolina Zjadewicz and Halima Moham- med for assistance with the data analysis, and Drs. Sharon Straus and Jayna Holroyd-Leduc for their careful review of the manuscript. Results expressed in this report are those of the investigators and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of Winnipeg Regional Health, Saskatoon Health Region, Alberta Health Services, or Canadian Patient Safety Institute.
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HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY

The legal requirements originally derived from The Fire Precautions (Workplace) Regulations 1997 as amended 1999 and the Fire Precautions Act 1971, and more generally under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. However, in an aim to simplify, rationalise and consolidate the existing fire safety legislation, the Fire Precautions (Workplace) Regulations 1997 as amended 1999 and the Fire Precautions Act 1971 are to be superseded by The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 which became law on the 1 st October 2006. The main effect of the changes will be a move towards greater emphasis on fire prevention in all non-domestic premises, including the voluntary sector and self-employed people with premises separate from their homes, and the provision for a risk-based approach to fire safety.
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Smart Health and Safety Equipment Monitoring System for Distributed Workplaces

Smart Health and Safety Equipment Monitoring System for Distributed Workplaces

In this paper, Smart Health and Safety Monitoring System is presented, which is a novel maintenance system for the early detection of H&S devices that are in critical state. The proposed system uses smart sensors for data collection and status monitoring. The goal is to monitor the status of consumable items, such as plasters and sterile wipes, in first aid boxes by monitoring the total change in box weight, level of earplug dispenser or weight change of a fire extinguisher. The battery state (i.e., remaining charge) is also monitored because H&S monitoring systems are equipped with smart sensors which run on batteries. The proposed prototype achieves high efficiency by using a genetic algorithm (GA), ant colony optimisation (ACO) algorithm and travelling salesman problem (TSP). With these algorithms, the system can find the shortest path within a short time and then access the facilities whose devices are critically low and thus require maintenance or replenishment. Furthermore, artificial neural networks to predict the optimal performance of the system and the correlation between effective input factors and performance output.
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HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY

HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY

All employees will be interviewed and assessed at Induction and on a regular basis to establish their training requirements. Records will be kept and a training programme will be established giving priority to the most hazardous areas and needs of young and/or new employees. No person will be permitted to drive any Company vehicle or use an article of plant unless they are selected and trained to do so. In addition, they will not be permitted to operate any machinery, apparatus, tool or installation until appropriate training has been provided. Arrangement will be made, where necessary, for suitable training of staff in the use of the fire fighting equipment and its proper maintenance. Management provides new employees with suitable health & safety induction training on the first day of their employment or as soon as possible thereafter, advising on health and safety hazards and explaining safe systems and methods of work. Supervision must ensure that all employees are provided with suitable personal protective equipment and record the issue of such equipment in the Health & Safety file.
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WHMIS After GHS: Preparing for Change. Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

WHMIS After GHS: Preparing for Change. Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

suppliers and employers can take in order to make the transition to “WHMIS after GHS”. The term “WHMIS after GHS” is used to describe the way WHMIS will work after the changes needed to implement the GHS in Canadian workplaces. Currently, the government departments responsible for workplace health and safety are working with other parties (suppliers, employers, and labour groups) to develop agreements on the detailed changes to Canadian legislation that will be required to implement WHMIS after GHS. The lead agency in this effort is the National Office of WHMIS (NOW) in Health Canada. Updated legislation at the federal, provincial and territorial levels will be required. Many details of the changes have been tentatively agreed. Specific regulatory proposals to update WHMIS legislation are anticipated in 2010.
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Personal Health. Public Health. Personal Safety. Public Safety

Personal Health. Public Health. Personal Safety. Public Safety

 ASAM Level I Outpatient Treatment (including brief interventions) ASAM Level I Outpatient Treatment (including brief interventions)  ASAM Level II Intensive Outpatient Treatment ASA[r]

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Occupational Health & Safety. First Aid in Saskatchewan Workplaces

Occupational Health & Safety. First Aid in Saskatchewan Workplaces

• Providers have periodic training, according to the standards of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and Saskatchewan Health. This training must include CPR training if the provider has not had this training in the last 12 months. It is recommended that some AED providers also have the training and responsibilities of a first aid attendant at the workplace.

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Provision of information on hazardous substances at workplaces. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

Provision of information on hazardous substances at workplaces. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

The Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984 lists a number of specific duties for all employers. Employers must, as far as practicable, provide information, instruction, training and supervision so that employees can perform their work safely and are not exposed to hazards.

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Mental Health, Law and Creating Inclusive Workplaces

Mental Health, Law and Creating Inclusive Workplaces

including workplace procedures for providing reasonable accommodation. The CRPD also encourages a reflection on whether existing methods of worker participation in other branches of employment law give sufficient weight to ensuring that the voices of workers with disabilities are heard. As mentioned above, worker participation is one strand to the enforcement model in occupational safety and health law. This touches upon the psychosocial risks present in the working environment, which can be a factor in triggering or exacerbating mental illness amongst workers. It is, therefore, relevant to consider ways in which the experiences and perspectives of workers with mental health problems can be incorporated within the system of worker participation already applying in this field. Better participation from workers with a diversity of disabilities might assist in ensuring that occupational safety and health measures give sufficient attention to psychosocial risks to workers’ health and avoid a narrow focus on risks to physical health.
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Checklist for workplaces with vehicle hoists

Checklist for workplaces with vehicle hoists

When purchasing plant, particularly vehicle hoists (new or used), it is important to ensure that the model that you are acquiring has been design registered with an occupational safety and health regulator in Australia. The design registration need not be with WorkSafe WA as the design registrations are recognised across Australia regardless of which workplace safety regulator has issued the registration. You should request your supplier to provide you with the design registration number for the model of plant you are acquiring along with details of the authority which issued that registration number.
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Managing the Risks of Falls at Workplaces

Managing the Risks of Falls at Workplaces

Consultation involves sharing of information, giving workers a reasonable opportunity to express views and taking those views into account before making decisions on health and safety matters. Section 47: The WHS Act requires that you consult, so far as is reasonably practicable, with workers who carry out work for you who are (or are likely to be) directly affected by a work health and safety matter

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SASKATCHEWAN ASSOCIATION FOR SAFE WORKPLACES IN HEALTH

SASKATCHEWAN ASSOCIATION FOR SAFE WORKPLACES IN HEALTH

The belief that staff and management should put the patient’s well-being above their own and the belief that patient safety and not worker safety is their role, are prime examples of the cultural perceptions that exist. The inability of current management systems and structures to take action to prevent injuries was by far the most often cited issue or barrier to improving workplace safety within the health sector.

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A Neural Network Classifier Model for Forecasting Safety Behavior at Workplaces

A Neural Network Classifier Model for Forecasting Safety Behavior at Workplaces

Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been recognized as a strong tool for developing predictive models, particularly for such a complex context as human behavior modeling and prediction, in which the interrelationships among variables are of high complexity and somewhat unknown. The approach has been shown to be strong, flexible, and easy to apply, and is better than conventional statistical methods in several ways. Contrary to conventional statistical methods, such as regression, ANN is adaptive, which means they can learn and adapt themselves with new data and become more intelligent in explaining and predicting the desired phenomenon [9]. Another important advantage of ANN over conventional statistical methods is that ANN do not need an underlying distribution to be specified, while most of statistical tests are performed on the basis of an underlying probability distribution (in most cases Gaussian distribution) [9]. The approach is able to model nonlinear relationships and its predictive performance is much better than that of conventional multiple regression approach [10, 11]. Given the capabilities of ANN, it has been extensively used in the field of occupational safety and health for predicting various outcomes, e. g. safety climate [12] and accident severity [13]. Accordingly, the aim of the present study is to develop an ANN model for forecasting safe behavior at workplaces and determine the most important factors affecting such a behavior.
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