Top PDF Higher Education Employment Report

Higher Education Employment Report

Higher Education Employment Report

Findings on jobs in higher education and the U.S. economy are based on data from the U.S. Department of Labor / Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Except where indicated otherwise, findings on advertised job postings in higher education are based on posting data from U.S. colleges and universities that have been continually subscribed to the HigherEdJobs unlimited posting plan since January 2009, a cohort of roughly 850 institutions. Each of the institutions included in this report has paid a flat fee for unlimited advertising and, consequently, has no financial deterrent to discourage it from posting any job opening on HigherEdJobs.
Show more

10 Read more

Minnesota Measures Report on Higher Education Performance

Minnesota Measures Report on Higher Education Performance

Affordability and perceptions of affordability are key considerations for students interested in pursuing postsecondary education� Minnesota’s two- and four-year public institutions had among the highest published tuition and fees nationally� Grants and scholarships reduce the published tuition and fees students pay by an average of about $2,500 at public universities and nearly $2,000 at two-year colleges in the state� The average net tuition and fees students and families actually pay, however, were higher across all types of postsecondary institutions in Minnesota than averages in Minnesota’s peer states or nationally� More than two-thirds of first-time full-time students received grants or scholarships to attend a postsecondary institution in Minnesota� Minnesota students apply for financial aid including grants, scholarships, and loans using the FAFSA at higher rates than the national average, which expands their available options for grants, scholarships, and loans� For students entering college, 84 percent of first-year Minnesota undergraduates received financial aid, which includes student loans, to help them pay the price of attendance in 2008-09�
Show more

96 Read more

Measurements of participation in Scottish higher education report

Measurements of participation in Scottish higher education report

5.9 Commenting on OECD rates Adelman (2009) notes that “neither gross enrolment ratios nor census participation ratios are as instructive for policy purposes as setting the denominator to students who completed upper secondary school in the country at issue. .... Call this the basic qualifying population, as it is the population for which the education system of the country is responsible. It includes academic track, general track, and vocational track upper secondary students. It can be divided by traditional and non-traditional routes. .... One then asks, ‘of the qualifying population, what proportion enters short-cycle degree programs and first cycle degree programs (a) immediately following qualification and (b) within [let us say] three years?’ .... The qualifying population then becomes the core of cohort histories.”
Show more

57 Read more

A STATUS REPORT OF SCHEDULED CASTES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

A STATUS REPORT OF SCHEDULED CASTES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

The HE cell’s find outs the key problem of higher education system in India. The lack of poor research training, weak assessment structure, lack of relevant resources, poor infrastructure etc. are detecting as the problem of higher education. The USA President Obama’s proposal was to develop a national scorecard for ranking universities. It was a valuable contribution to improving the accountability for higher education. Because the public benefit arise only from broad access to high quality of education.
Show more

7 Read more

From graduate employability to employment: policy and practice in UK higher education

From graduate employability to employment: policy and practice in UK higher education

Page | 4 directly comparable and joining up the different statistics is fraught with data compatibility problems. For example, the First Destination Survey gives us a reasonable first take on the range of different jobs and different types of organisations students may end up working in the first 6 months; the Association of Graduate Recruiters (AGR) is able to provide data relating to member companies of the AGR but necessarily this is limited to larger graduate recruitment companies. In summary, it is not possible to rigorously assess whether there is a theoretical balance of demand and supply in the graduate employment market. While large business graduate recruitment activity can be studied, small business data is lacking and thus missing the full picture. The HESA/ONS date referred to above suggests some 142,000 graduates may not have the skills and experience mix on their CV to secure a graduate level job.
Show more

22 Read more

L. Allen Slade 4751 Yeardley Loop Williamsburg, VA Education. Employment Higher Education

L. Allen Slade 4751 Yeardley Loop Williamsburg, VA Education. Employment Higher Education

Presented at the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Dallas, April, 1998. Cross-cultural equivalence in attitude surveys[r]

5 Read more

Higher education, mature students and employment goals: policies and practices in the UK

Higher education, mature students and employment goals: policies and practices in the UK

The term 'higher education' is used in different ways in different societies, and is increasingly referred to as tertiary education, that is post-school education which usually takes place in a university. The distinction drawn between full-time and part-time higher education varies considerably between countries. In some countries (e.g. France, Germany) there is no official distinction; in others (e.g. Canada, the United States) the distinction is mainly based on relative workload. In the United Kingdom (UK) the distinction is made primarily on the basis of funding, and does not always reflect the actual time students spend studying. Despite such definitional problems, it seems quite clear that in practice, part-time students have for some time made up a substantial proportion, typically between one-third and one-half, of the total enrolment of most Western developed systems of formal higher education (Tight 1991; Teicher 2007), and that their numbers are growing. Part-time provision tends to be particularly common at sub-degree level, especially when this focuses on preparation for Bachelors degree course entry, and at postgraduate level. But it also accounts for a considerable proportion of those on undergraduate courses, particularly in North America and Australasia.
Show more

25 Read more

Female Labor Market Participation and Socioeconomic Development: Disentangling the U Shaped Hypothesis

Female Labor Market Participation and Socioeconomic Development: Disentangling the U Shaped Hypothesis

According to Goldin (1995), the adult female’s labor market participation across the economic development process is U-shaped. At the initial stages of development, countries are poor and the economy is based on elementary agricultural production, mainly performed in family farms. Females participate to a large extent in the labor force at this stage, sometimes as paid laborers but more often in unpaid family work. As income levels increase due to the industrialization process brought about by new technology, FLMP falls, creating the downward portion of the U-shaped curve. Industrialization shifts the locus of production from the family farm to manual wage employment in agriculture, industry, construction and transportation. Such jobs are usually taken by men due to social stigma against married female participation in manual labor. Higher income levels from male wage employment also lead to an income effect, which serves to reduce a married female’s necessity to work and FLMP. Male education levels rise at this development stage, while female education levels remain low.
Show more

30 Read more

Supporting equity in higher education : a report to the Minister for Education and Science

Supporting equity in higher education : a report to the Minister for Education and Science

Two main student loan programmes are offered through the William Ford Direct Loan Program (FDLP) and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Whereas the federal government administers the direct loan program (1/3 of loans), banks and other lending agencies provide FFELP loans (2/3 of loans), that are guaranteed against default by the federal government. Colleges and universities choose which loan programme they will use for attending students. Both programmes offer two types of Stafford student loans: subsidised and unsubsidised. For students who take out a subsidised loan, the federal Government pays the interest while a person is studying. Parents of dependent students can also get loans to pay for their children’s education – borrowed in the name of the parent (The Federal PLUS Loan). Consolidation loans are available through the FDLP and FFELP that allows borrowers to combine several types of loans with various repayment schedules into one loan. Student loan programmes are applied towards tuition fees and living costs, with funds disbursed by the college or university attended. There are maximum amounts that can be borrowed depending on the year in school.
Show more

85 Read more

ASSESSMENT AND COMPARISON OF THE OCCUPATION STATUS OF GRADUATES IN ACADEMIC CENTERS OF EDUCATION, CULTURE & RESEARCH AND AGRICULTURE EDUCATION CENTERS IN IRAN 

ASSESSMENT AND COMPARISON OF THE OCCUPATION STATUS OF GRADUATES IN ACADEMIC CENTERS OF EDUCATION, CULTURE & RESEARCH AND AGRICULTURE EDUCATION CENTERS IN IRAN 

Thus attracting universities and centers of higher education graduates in the labor market is that part of subject to having the capabilities and features; it must be created during college. It seems to be a mismatch between the process and materials courses at universities . Skills and abilities are the most important factors of graduates in employment and occupation (Rahmani et al, 2003).

5 Read more

Higher education in further education colleges: outcomes of the consultation: a report to Hefce

Higher education in further education colleges: outcomes of the consultation: a report to Hefce

‘We agree with the views outlined in paragraph 38, however there are some concerns about the characterisation of provision and approaches in FECs and HEIs which we would like to develop. We agree that it would be unfortunate if recognition of the FECs’ contribution to the overall pattern of HE provision resulted in the perception that only HE in FECs was employer focused and flexible. The move towards a model which is more responsive to the needs of employers and which actively seeks to embed employer involvement in the development and delivery of higher education courses is very much in line with [the university’s] strategy for foundation degrees, part-time and short cycle courses, within the [HEI] as well as its partners. Equally damaging would be any move towards creating a binary system where foundation degrees, sub degree programmes and short courses were seen as the domain of further education colleges and possibly of less value than the higher education courses delivered in HEIs. We therefore endorse the advice of the Quality Assessment Learning and Teaching Committee in relation to over prescribing the role of FECs and the dangers inherent in a strict division of labour. Whilst we applaud the ability of many further education colleges to respond quickly and flexibly to identified skills needs, we are less comfortable with the implication that HEIs are less committed to responding effectively. There are real dangers in characterising the HE sector as homogenous, at a time when wide variations of mission exist between
Show more

43 Read more

'The Institute': A new model of education and training for young people in Bristol?: A scoping study and report for Arts Council England

'The Institute': A new model of education and training for young people in Bristol?: A scoping study and report for Arts Council England

education activity by arts organisations through the same models and to the group sizes that they are currently (and are used to) working with (which are very small comparative to those used within standard formal education). There are exceptions to this – if, for example learners are classified as having additional needs, and/or being from hard to reach groups, there may be higher levels of funding available to deliver provision. However, building a funding model based on these higher levels of funding may be unsustainable for organisations – specifically given the additional support needs and specialist support that some young people may require. This would also effectively mean that the provision was defined as ‘alternative,’ which would exclude other young people who may be disadvantaged, but who are not considered (in relation to the criteria used to assess funding entitlements) to be disaffected and/or experiencing additional learning differences.
Show more

62 Read more

Accelerated degrees in Higher Education : Case study report

Accelerated degrees in Higher Education : Case study report

year courses in future. For example, one university commented that they are planning to revalidate their existing three-year Marketing degree and are hoping that they may be able to develop a two-year version of the same course. Members of staff felt that the market exists for accelerated degrees and, although it is often hard to target the right students to let them know about these opportunities, awareness of accelerated degrees is definitely growing, albeit slowly. Several members of staff mentioned the recent increase in fees as a significant factor in making their two-year courses more attractive options for many students, as one course leader said, if students are ‘saving £9,000 in fees plus, you know, living costs: it’s going to become more popular.’ Given that students are now consumers of education, a senior member of one institution’s marketing team said, ‘Universities would be foolish not to look at it as a product.’
Show more

67 Read more

MEASURING UP THE NATIONAL REPORT CARD ON HIGHER EDUCATION

MEASURING UP THE NATIONAL REPORT CARD ON HIGHER EDUCATION

This year, the National Center replaced the data derived from the Census Bureau’s Current Popu- lation Survey (CPS) with the American Commu- nity Survey (ACS), which is also administered by the Census Bureau. The ACS was expanded to a sample size of three million households in 2005 and will eventually replace the long survey form of the decennial census. It has much larger sam- ple sizes than the CPS, making it a valuable re- source for state data. As a result of this change, comparing results from previous years is no longer possible for all of the indicators that were based on the CPS. The indicators affected in- clude: the percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds with a high school credential; the percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds enrolled in higher education; the percentage of 25- to 49-year-olds enrolled in higher education; certificates and degrees awarded per 1,000 state residents (age 18 to 49) without a college degree; and the percentage of the population with either an associate’s or a bachelor’s degree. The national advisory board for Measuring Up and the National Center have concluded that, compared with the CPS data, the new data provide states with a more comprehen- sive portrayal of their performance. (For more in- formation, please see the Technical Guide for Measuring Up 2008 at www.highereducation.org).
Show more

36 Read more

Stockport College of Further and Higher Education inspection report

Stockport College of Further and Higher Education inspection report

programming, the quality of students’ work is good and the pass rates are high. 3 Many of the adult students who attend the college have few, if any, prior qualifications. Some, who attend access courses in order to move on to further or higher education, make good progress. For example, science students on access courses produce high quality work, some of which shows well-developed information technology (IT) skills. In modern foreign languages, many adults who enrol for courses do not wish to take the examination and leave the course early. Students with learning difficulties and/or disabilities make good progress in developing basic and social skills. Their initial assessment is thorough and the results are used well to monitor their subsequent progress. Most students who attend basic skills
Show more

54 Read more

Higher Education and Research Bill : committee stage report

Higher Education and Research Bill : committee stage report

With a diminishing amount of grant funding available, the Secretary of State must be able to ensure that the OFS is fully aware of which subjects are of strategic importance to the nation. This is necessary to allow the OFS to provide top-up funding to high-cost subjects, such as STEM, in the way HEFCE does now. The key word here is “strategic”. The guidance will not be specific; for example, it cannot be used to target individual courses at individual higher education providers. Clause 2(5) makes that clear. We must remember that we are talking about guidance here: it can advise, perhaps strongly, but it cannot mandate. 97
Show more

63 Read more

Developing the conditions for education for citizenship in higher education (CiCe network report)

Developing the conditions for education for citizenship in higher education (CiCe network report)

Specially formatted and piloted questionnaires were distributed (via e-mail, through post or in person) to 200 members of the Children’s Identity and Citizenship in Europe (CiCe) network. 38 questionnaires were filled in and returned. The response rate was approximately 20% and, given the wide range of countries involved from Greece to Iceland and from Ireland to Lithuania, it could be claimed that the information provided was representative in terms of offering the opportunity to make sense of the situation that exists in HE institutions in relation to citizenship education. We could expect that these responses reflect a wide range of initiatives going on in the field of citizenship education in HE. This information was to be referenced with that collected via interviews carried out with a number of academics, administration officers and policy makers in the three countries of the case studies (Greece, Lithuania and Scotland), outlined in Section 2.
Show more

29 Read more

The morphology of change: an exploartion of perceptions about changing the age of transfer of pupils from primary to secondary school

The morphology of change: an exploartion of perceptions about changing the age of transfer of pupils from primary to secondary school

Department for Education and Employment* Education Reform Act Funding Agency for Schools Grant Maintained Governor Headteacher Letter Local Management of Schools Newspaper report Nationa[r]

219 Read more

English Language Perplexity: articulating the tensions in the AUQA Good Practice Principles

English Language Perplexity: articulating the tensions in the AUQA Good Practice Principles

The issue is further complicated by the so- called “massification” of higher education which is widening even more the spectrum of linguistic capital of students entering Australian tertiary institutions. Following the lead of other western countries, Australia is urging wider access to tertiary study, and in response to recommendations in the Bradley Report (Bradley, Noonan, Nugent & Scales, 2008), universities will be working to attract greater numbers of students from low socio-economic status and non-traditional backgrounds: a target of 40% participation has been set (Bradley et al., 2008). Indeed, the GPPs report recognises this context, making reference to the effect of “widening participation” (AUQA, 2009, p. 2) on students’ language proficiency. In fact, despite the title of the document, only two of the 10 principles themselves refer specifically to “international students.” In its second paragraph, the report actually suggests that the GPPs would benefit “all post-secondary students” (p. 1), not only international university students, and nearly all the examples of good practice explicitly or implicitly target both domestic and international, ESB and NESB students. Emanating from language professionals within the universities, this perspective represents a counter-voice to Birrell’s: a voice which is intimately aware of the actual diversity of the student body. It is clear then that universities must avoid taking the GPPs on face value as applying only to “international students” or even
Show more

13 Read more

Financing Higher Education in India

Financing Higher Education in India

The private for-profit or self-financing institutions have acquired a large, and mostly undocumented. presence in the higher education system. The data base for such institutions is extremely weak. As discussed earlier, their presence has been most noted in professional and technical education but even here enrolment figures are not available, and analysts rely on the numbers of recognized institutions or permitted intake. But even in general education, there is now a mushrooming of private, self-financing colleges. In one university alone, the number of such colleges outnumbered state assisted colleges in the ratio of 3:1. The growth of self-financing institutions has been most marked in the three Southern states of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka, and the Western state of Maharashtra. In Tamil Nadu, self financing colleges comprised 56 % of arts and science colleges, and 96 % of engineering colleges in 2003-04. The enrolment in these colleges accounts for the major part of the difference between the enrolments reported in the official statistical system and those captured by household surveys. According to the CABE committee report, there is a sense in which the Indian higher education system is one of the most privatised in the world. These institutions charge commercial fee rates, but besides have in the past been known not to adhere to any transparent admission procedure and in many cases, charge ‘capitation fees’. There have been attempts to regulate their fee structure (at least for part of the admissions), and systemize admission procedure in a piecemeal fashion through court judgments and state or national level regulations.
Show more

7 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...