Top PDF Higher education student numbers

Higher education student numbers

Higher education student numbers

UCAS breaks down some of its group entry rates by the ‘tariff’ level of different universities. There are three tariff groups; high, medium and low and these refer to average grades of students admitted. High tariff institutions where entrants have higher grades are generally considered more prestigious and harder to get into. This type of analysis therefore can shed light on a different aspect of widening participation. In 2018 only 2.7% of 18 year olds from England who were eligible for FSM at school got into one of these high tariff universities. The rate has increased over time from less than 1.5% in the period 2006 to 2010, but was still well below the 10.0% for the non-FSM group. The size of the relative gap has fallen over time; in 2006 the non-FSM group were almost six time as likely to go to a high tariff university and this fell to below four times as likely in 2015 onwards. However, the absolute gap has increased in recent years from six percentage points in 2012 to more than seven points in 2016, 2017 and 2018.
Show more

20 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

UCAS breaks down some of its group entry rates by the ‘tariff’ level of different universities. There are three tariff groups; high, medium and low and these refer to average grades of students admitted. High tariff institutions where entrants have higher grades are generally considered more prestigious and harder to get into. This type of analysis therefore can shed light on a different aspect of widening participation. In 2018 only 2.7% of 18 year olds from England who were eligible for FSM at school got into one of these high tariff universities. The rate has increased over time from less than 1.5% in the period 2006 to 2010, but was still well below the 10.0% for the non-FSM group. The size of the relative gap has fallen over time; in 2006 the non-FSM group were almost six time as likely to go to a high tariff university and this fell to below four times as likely in 2015 onwards. However, the absolute gap has increased in recent years from six percentage points in 2012 to more than seven points in 2016, 2017 and 2018.
Show more

20 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

UCAS uses a number of different classifications of disadvantage among 18 year olds for its entry rates. These include where people live (POLAR3 classification of levels of young HE participation) and proxy measures for family income -whether the student was eligible for free school meals (FSM) or their family received a means-tested benefit while they were at school. According to UCAS:

17 Read more

Higher education student numbers: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 23 January 2017

Higher education student numbers: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 23 January 2017

There were almost 720,000 applications for full-time undergraduate places through UCAS in 2016 and 535,000 were accepted. The table opposite summarises trends since UCAS was created following the reform of the sector in the early 1990s. The same data is illustrated in the chart below. These are annual numbers of applicants and entrants so show changes in the flow of students, not the overall population. There have been underlying increases in applicants and acceptances (averaging 2.2% and 3.1% a year respectively) since the mid-1990s. The total number of home applicants via UCAS rose in each year
Show more

18 Read more

ENHANCING STUDENT EMPLOYABILITY: HIGHER EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

ENHANCING STUDENT EMPLOYABILITY: HIGHER EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Executive Education (long-term management training programmes for working executives) transpires to be the fourth most preferred mode of academia- industry partnership. Palki and chauhan (2009) conducted a study on Management Education in India, which elucidates that there is a fundamental shift in business school offerings away from traditional MBA programmes to more part-time and executive education programmes. Indian Institute of Management (IIMs) has been extending their domains to executive education on modular classes to facilitate executives’ involvement and strike relationship with organizations. XLRI (India) among others have created a Partnership Model with organizations for Executive Education initiatives. Management Development Institute (MDI), one of the top business schools in India was established with the prime objective of imparting management education to executives and government officials. Today, even after expanding itself into other forays, it still conducts six month to one year National Management programmes (NMP) for company sponsored executives and civil services officials. These initiatives besides increasing the industry mind-share also fetch revenue to business schools. Finally, the business school faculty is slowly integrating the industry’s views into their curriculum. Miller (2010) identifies significant revisions in curriculum and contents, which are undertaken in business schools, with an objective of including industry recommendations. Many business schools in India have been inviting suggestions from industry to update their curriculum and include the topics of present day relevance. This is done with a view of imparting the knowledge and skills set, needed by graduating students in constantly changing global business environment.
Show more

11 Read more

Student Performance Analysis System for Higher Secondary Education

Student Performance Analysis System for Higher Secondary Education

-------------------------------------------------------------------------***------------------------------------------------------------------------ Abstract - Although data mining has been successfully implemented in the business world for some time now, its use in higher education is still relatively new. It is important to study and analyze educational data especially student’s performance. Using data mining the aim was to develop a model which can derive the conclusion on students academic success. To construct a model for Students academic result, these needs analyzing data, graphical representation techniques and report generation. This will help to identify the weak students and help them to score better marks. It can be used for improvement of academic results. In further studies with identifying and evaluating variables associated with process of higher education, and with the sample increase, it would be possible to produce a model which would stand as a foundation for the development of analysis system for higher education.
Show more

5 Read more

Social influence and student choice of higher education institution

Social influence and student choice of higher education institution

ten in a way that does not lead to misinterpretations (Hartley, & Morphew, 2008). These issues are vital as student choices are in ß uenced by perceptions of HEI quality, and these perceptions are formed through institutional com- munication and interactions with staff. Although the increase of the online sources of information and the application of electronic media in regard to HEI recruitment are found to be responsible for increased ef Þ ciency of institutional communication, the printed material remains an important source of informa- tion (Gifford, Briceño-Perriott, & Mianzo, 2005; Hossler, 1999). One of the clear advantages of the electronic versus printed media is the ability to personalise the content, and at the same time facilitate the connection between student and the HE institution, and the immediacy of response (Donehower, 2003; Page, & Castleman, 2013). The recent emergence of handheld, mobile technology, com- bined with the increasing affordability and subsequent accessibility of these devices, provides current and future students with broad access to a range of electronic communication platforms that include web content, email and social media communication, and texting.
Show more

15 Read more

National strategy for access and student success in higher education

National strategy for access and student success in higher education

8. The Government also strengthened the role and resources of OFFA which, through its regulation of access agreements, plays a key role in safeguarding and promoting fair access and ensuring that reforms to the higher education system do not unintentionally raise barriers to WP. OFFA’s focus has broadened from concentrating mainly on access to include retention, student success and progression from HE. 9. OFFA’s increased resource enables it to engage more fully with institutions, providing greater support and challenge to them. This has included focusing more strongly on outcomes (that is, universities’ and colleges’ performance on access and student success). With the rise in fees, OFFA has been able to secure more institutional investment than under the previous fee arrangements with a greater differentiation in expenditure according to each institution’s performance. OFFA is also now able to take a more active role in growing the evidence base that underpins WP work, through identifying good practice and by commissioning, and carrying out in-house, analysis and research. Next steps
Show more

115 Read more

Numbers of Students with Disabilities Studying in Higher Education in Ireland 2017/18

Numbers of Students with Disabilities Studying in Higher Education in Ireland 2017/18

involved in the delivery and management of our higher education sector. It is heartening to report that this year survey’s results confirms that students with disabilities are making the transition into higher education in ever increasing numbers. In the academic year 17/18 they represented 6.2% of the total student population. However, this positive growth trajectory does not hold for students with sensory disabilities that is students who are listed under the Deaf/Hard of hearing or Blind/Visually impaired categories. This is alarming given that AHEAD has raised and publicised this issue in the past and that the Higher Education Authority (HEA) has identified both categories as target groups to promote their advancement in education.
Show more

88 Read more

Numbers of Students with Disabilities Studying in Higher Education in Ireland 2013/14

Numbers of Students with Disabilities Studying in Higher Education in Ireland 2013/14

AHEAD asked responding institutions to provide information about the numbers of staff with responsibility for supporting students with disabilities and the number of learning support staff employed by the responding institutions. Responses were delivered as a decimal number where one full time (5 days a week) staff member = 1, and part-time staff members were included as a pro rata fraction of 1. For example, a college with one full time staff member working 5 days a week and one part time staff member working 2 days a week would report 1.4 staff members. Where staff members had shared responsibility over students with disabilities as well as other student groups, they were asked to estimate how much of their remit was dedicated to students with disabilities.
Show more

54 Read more

Numbers of Students with Disabilities Studying in Higher Education in Ireland 2016/17

Numbers of Students with Disabilities Studying in Higher Education in Ireland 2016/17

• To date, we have not had many lecturers that have not permitted recording devices in class and if they have it has been for several reasons: they feel it is not appropriate to record the content of the particular module due to students sharing experiences etc., they have offered another reasonable accommodation in its place e.g. notes by email, or they have concerns about where the recorded materials are kept and who has access to them. The [Responding Institution] make it clear as to what the procedures are and students have to sign an agreement, as well as staff. More work needs to be done with HR in the coming year with regard to Intellectual Property and ascertaining whether the lecturers has this or if the college itself has it. Once this has been established we will have more information as to how to proceed with the Recording of Lectures in the future. We do always say to the lecturers that any student could be recording them on any recording device without their knowledge in class, or without their permission, and we are trying to ensure that there are some boundaries and rules around … students and their recordings. Most lecturers to date have not had issue but we have had some enquiries and refusals but in each case another reasonable accommodation was offered, to the best of our knowledge - we do need to ask ourselves if this is good enough or if the student SHOULD have the CHOICE.
Show more

84 Read more

The Browne Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

The Browne Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

Russell Group Director General Dr Wendy Piatt said: “We support the urgent and necessary reforms outlined by the Browne Review. These recommendations could make or break our world-class universities. That’s because, bluntly, our leading institutions will not be able to compete with generously-funded universities in other countries if they are not able to secure extra funding. The proposals offer a very good deal for students and a fair and progressive way forward which protects low-earners. Unless we ask graduates to make a bigger contribution, they – as well as society as a whole - will be short-changed. This is the stark choice the country has to wrestle with. Our graduates need to compete with the best in the world, and we would be letting them down if we didn’t ensure they get the very best education.
Show more

19 Read more

Student voice by numbers

Student voice by numbers

The start of this article drew attention to the fact that Fielding (2001) has argued that many student voice projects can act as a catalyst for change in schools including improvements to student–teacher relationships. These student researchers believed they possessed trusting relationships with many of their teachers in ‘East Valley’ prior to their departure to Finland. But then again, why would they question ‘trust’ as constructed, positioned and situated within an institutional setting and context they have been socialised into? Their perceptions of the synthetic trust experienced in their school in England are partially grounded within school-based structures, procedures and cultural values that obscure a ‘gulf in trust’ (Leitch and Mitchell 2007) between learners and teachers despite the rhetoric of student voice participation. In fact, it is only by taking student researchers out of their own institutions to research and interpret a world elsewhere that young learners can possibly hope to bring back critically informed perspectives of benefit to them and their schools and avoid interpreting the already interpreted world of education they know. Strikingly apparent from these interviews is the perception by these student researchers of fundamentally different sets of relationships between teachers and learners cultivated in the Finnish school they visited, and the impact that these relationships had on the learning environments they observed. While
Show more

5 Read more

Teacher Dimensions in Technical Higher Education A Student Perspective

Teacher Dimensions in Technical Higher Education A Student Perspective

What is more, over the course of the past decades, within tertiary education, there has been a high focus on conducting research likely to outline a profile of the real university teacher as opposed to the ideal one from a student perspective. The aim of these studies is to underline the evolution of the real and ideal teacher’s profile in higher education. Thus, there is a constant interest in identifying the characteristics of the ideal teacher, considered important by students and in outlining the dimensions of the real university teacher (performing nowadays in tertiary system). Consequently, the current studies deem fit to highlight the gap between real and ideal in profiling the higher education teacher. (Mannan and Traicoff 1976; Harley, Barasa, Bertram, Mattson and Pillay 2000; Arnon and Reichel 2007; Rusu, Șoitu and Panaite 2011; Haamer, Lepp and Reva 2012; Douna, Kyridis, Zagkos, Ziontaki, and Pandis, 2015; Nartgüna and Özenb 2015).
Show more

22 Read more

Experience Of Control And Student Satisfaction With Higher Education Services

Experience Of Control And Student Satisfaction With Higher Education Services

Data for this study were collected via a self-reported questionnaire administered to 165 students enrolled at a major university in South Korea. The questionnaire was composed of three sections: control measures (cognitive control, behavioral control, and experience of control measures), dependent measures (i.e., service quality and satisfaction), and demographic questions. Likert scales were adopted as a response category for control measures. Cognitive control was measured by using a four-item scale, which includes the students’ understanding, capability of predicting, familiarity with the program, and ability to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the program in which they were enrolled. Behavioral control was incorporated into the questionnaire by using a four-item scale that includes the choice availability in course selection, availability of exercising influence on school policies, and availability of auditing courses before registering. Experience of control was measured by a four-item scale, addressing the belief of one’s capability of getting the best education, capability of gaining the most benefits out of school life, capability of getting the most value from school life, and overall perceived control on school matters. Satisfaction was measured by a three-item scale which used a 7-point scale ranging from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied).
Show more

10 Read more

A STUDY OF REASON OF ABSENTEEISM OF STUDENT AT HIGHER EDUCATION LEVEL

A STUDY OF REASON OF ABSENTEEISM OF STUDENT AT HIGHER EDUCATION LEVEL

Student absenteeism is a major concern for elementary and secondary school educators today. It has become a complex, educational, political and social problem that is generating increase in interest among educators, researchers and policy makers. The problem of absenteeism is becoming the concern of every member of society since it has negative consequences at both individual and social level. The problem is precipitated by the interplay of factors which are both internal and external to the student and/ or the school. The paper highlighted the common causes of student absenteeism like family health or financial concerns, poor school climate, drug and alcohol use, transportation problems, and differing community attitude towards education are among the conditions that are often associated with a child’s frequent absence from school.
Show more

11 Read more

Student projects empowering mobile learning in higher education

Student projects empowering mobile learning in higher education

It should be noted that this project was undertaken collaboratively by two students. The work was divided up according to the planned functionality: one student undertook the server part and the other undertook the client part for the data display. A joint project between two students can be a risky venture because, if one drops out, they both suffer. However, if they succeed in working together, then the teamwork competencies are considerably strengthened, as was the case in this instance. In this project in particular, one of the students did not have any experience in mobile app development, and he/she compensated for his/her lack experience with a self-teaching attitude and remarkable dedication. The implemented tool was fully functional and both students asserted that, owing to its modular structure, it had been designed to be easily extensible. They planned to make the app freely available to the general public in an app marketplace at some time in the future.
Show more

16 Read more

Enriching Stakeholder Theory: Student Identity of Higher Education

Enriching Stakeholder Theory: Student Identity of Higher Education

In terms of stakeholder theory, the rejection of the proposal that students are being customers means the fol- lowings: First, higher education would no longer be associated with the positivist perspective of the marketiza- tion of higher education. Rather, the “colonization” of higher education is more fundamentally an issue which requires more thorough analysis to discover the nature of the root causes. Second, the success of management would now be primarily measured by how well school management interacts with such process of colonization which affects whether or not quality of education is substantiated. Third, stakeholders’ welfare would no longer be accounted by single transactions or short term gains. Rather, relationship building efforts aiming at the long term welfare quality assurance based on multiple strands are to be considered for implementation. Fourth, stake- holders’ constituency to the market is now neutrally shifted back to an education institute, hence, redefining the true meaning of concepts like “school”, “teacher” or “student” would help higher education management gain new insight on its managerial contour.
Show more

6 Read more

The Independent Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

The Independent Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

14. Students with higher earnings after graduation will pay a real interest rate on the outstanding balance for the costs of learning and living. The interest rate will be equal to the Government‟s cost of borrowing (inflation plus 2.2%). Students earning below the repayment threshold will pay no real interest rate. The loan balance will increase in-line with inflation.

12 Read more

First-Generation College Student Success in Higher Education.

First-Generation College Student Success in Higher Education.

The first difference is that first-generation students planning to attend college are required to maneuver the application process without help from their parents because many of their parents have limited knowledge of the often complicated process (Choy, 2001; Wimberly & Noeth, 2004). A second difference is that first-generation students benefit more from college preparation during high school including learning what to expect of college life and an absence of this preparation puts them at a disadvantage (Noeth & Wimberly, 2002). Third, first-generation students have been found to lack rigorous academic preparation compared with their peers with college-educated parents because their parents may not realize the need to complete challenging courses (Martinez & Klopott, 2005; Warburton, Bugarin, & Nunez, 2001). The fourth difference that has been recorded is that first- generation students often perceive college education as a requirement to successful
Show more

181 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...

Related subjects