Top PDF HIV infected men who have sex with men in Israel: knowledge, attitudes and sexual behavior

HIV infected men who have sex with men in Israel: knowledge, attitudes and sexual behavior

HIV infected men who have sex with men in Israel: knowledge, attitudes and sexual behavior

MSM in this study who performed UAI were more commonly younger and more likely to identify them- selves as gay men than those who use condoms consist- ently and they also had more previous STD than those who used condoms constantly (Table 3). Their know- ledge about post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) was infer- ior, yet they were more likely to raise the issue of HIV before sex, had more steady partners and more com- monly used party drugs, alcohol and erectile dysfunction medications. In addition, they had earlier first sexual de- but than those who used condoms. In the multivariate analysis, insufficient knowledge about PEP, raising the issue of HIV before/during sex, having a steady partner, reporting of a more common use of party drugs or erectile dysfunction medications and being at an early age for the first sexual debut was associated with UAI. HIV-infection was not found to predict UAI in the multivariate analysis.
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Predictors of antiretroviral therapy initiation: a cross sectional study among Chinese HIV infected men who have sex with men

Predictors of antiretroviral therapy initiation: a cross sectional study among Chinese HIV infected men who have sex with men

Each participant completed a questionnaire on socio- demographic characteristics: age, ethnicity, marital status, education, occupation, registered household in Beijing (or Beijing Hukou ), duration of living in Beijing, and sexual orientation. The questionnaire also assessed behavioral risk factors: unprotected insertive or receptive anal sex, most recent CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count (CD4+ count), and history of sexually transmitted diseases (STD, including chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes simplex type 2, etc.). Those who had been diagnosed with HIV infection prior to participation in this study were also asked about AIDS-like clinical symptoms, experiences of using ART and HIV care and counseling, such as sub- stance use, mental health, stigma coping strategies, bene- fits of ART, and prevention of HIV transmission.
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Analysis of HIV Diversity in HIV-Infected Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (HPTN 061)

Analysis of HIV Diversity in HIV-Infected Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (HPTN 061)

The HPTN 061 study (NCT 00951249) enrolled 1,553 Black MSM in six US cities: Atlanta, Boston, Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco, and Washington, DC [25,26]. Men were enrolled between July 2009 and October 2010 and followed for one year. Study recruitment methods and eligibility are described in previous reports [25,26]. Briefly, self-identified Black MSM who reported at least one instance of unprotected anal intercourse in the prior six months were recruited from the community or were referred by their sexual network partners. HIV rapid tests and tests for sexually transmitted infections were performed at the study sites at the enrollment, 6-month, and 12-month study visits. CD4 cell count and HIV viral load were measured for men with HIV infection. Behavioral assessments were administered at each study visit using audio computer-assisted self-interviews. In addition, participants completed demographic and social and sexual network questionnaires with an interviewer.
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Factors Associated With HIV Testing in Teenage Men Who Have Sex With Men

Factors Associated With HIV Testing in Teenage Men Who Have Sex With Men

Overall, the lack of research on facilitating and impeding factors for HIV testing among AMSM creates a critical knowledge gap for policies and pediatrician practices that can help support the goal of eliminating HIV transmissions in the next decade. 1 Here, we report data on HIV testing in a large sample of AMSM aged 13 to 18. We explore factors associated with ever having received an HIV test, which are drawn from CDC recommendations on need for testing (ie, risk behaviors), literature on testing among adolescents broadly (ie, school sex education, parent- child discussions, and provider conversations), theoretical models of HIV prevention behaviors (ie, the IMB model 28 ), and research on sexual minority youth (ie, outness 32,33 ).
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HIV sexual risk behavior and preferred HIV prevention service outlet by men who have sex with men in Nigeria

HIV sexual risk behavior and preferred HIV prevention service outlet by men who have sex with men in Nigeria

There were three key findings from the study. First, there are differences in the HIV sexual risk behaviors of MSM resident in urban and rural areas: more MSM in urban than rural areas had three or more HIV sexual risk behaviors and were less likely to use condom at last sexual intercourse; while more MSM in the rural than urban areas had a history of forced sexual initiation, had earlier age of sexual debut, and had more than one sex- ual partner. Second, more MSM were willing to access HIV prevention service provided through peer-led health facilities. Factors that deter MSM from using public health centers were service providers’ poor knowledge about HIV and MSM health issues, non-friendly ser- vices, stigmatization by service providers and inability of public health facilities to prevent police harassment. Third, significantly more MSM with multiple sexual risk behaviors were willing to access mental and psychosocial health services, HIV positive peer support programs and training on human rights and paralegal services. Most MSM willing to access these services felt they were not available.
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Metacognitions mediate HIV stigma and depression/anxiety in men who have sex with men living with HIV

Metacognitions mediate HIV stigma and depression/anxiety in men who have sex with men living with HIV

Metacognitive beliefs dictating the meaning and impor- tance placed on one’s cognitions are believed to trigger the use of ineffective thought control strategies aimed at sup- pressing or removing distressing thoughts (Wells and Carter, 2009). Research assessing these strategies has typi- cally used Wells and Davies (1994) Thought Control Questionnaire (TCQ) that examines five thought control strategies. Worry as a thought control strategy involves using minor worries as a means of suppressing more upset- ting thoughts and has been associated with both anxiety (generalized anxiety disorder (GAD); Coles and Heimberg, 2005; Wells and Carter, 2009) and depression (Barahmand, 2009; Wells and Carter, 2009). Punishment as a thought control strategy involves using behaviours such as slap- ping, pinching and yelling at oneself to manage distressing thoughts (Wells and Davies, 1994) and may be more strongly linked to generalised anxiety than to depressive symptoms (Wells and Davies, 2009). In contrast, thought control strategies focused on talking about distressing thoughts with peers (Social), rationally analysing thoughts (Reappraisal) and focusing on work or more pleasant activ- ities (Distraction) have shown either non-significant or negative associations with psychological distress (Wells, 2008). This study builds upon a recent study which further demonstrates the important role of both metacognitions and thought control strategies in differentiating those who are currently depressed from those who have previously been depressed and those who have never been depressed (Halvorsen et al., 2014).
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Prevalence and correlates of HIV infection among men who have sex with men: a multi-provincial cross-sectional study in the southwest of China

Prevalence and correlates of HIV infection among men who have sex with men: a multi-provincial cross-sectional study in the southwest of China

pendently associated with the behaviors HIV infection; we used multiple logistic regression models in which we entered all variables that were associated with the outcome in the bivariate analysis at a P-value ≤ 0.05. A total of 80% of the participants were in the modeling sample and 20% were in the model validity test and evaluation. Forecasting accuracy and the area under the receiver operating char- acteristic (ROC) curve were used to evaluate the accuracy of the prediction model. The probability of HIV infection among the HIV-negative participants was predicted by the established logistic regression model. The bound was set at 0.5 and if the predicted score was > 0.5, then the predicted result was regarded as positive; otherwise, it was negative.
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HIV serostatus disclosure is not associated with safer sexual behavior among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) and their partners at risk for infection in Bangkok, Thailand

HIV serostatus disclosure is not associated with safer sexual behavior among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) and their partners at risk for infection in Bangkok, Thailand

OR 13.6, 95% CI [2.15, 85.9]; adjusted OR 13.0, 95% CI [1.28, 125]) (Table 2). There was no association between disclosure and protected sex among subjects with serodis- cordant and serostatus-unknown partners as most of these men reported protected sex with partners regardless of whether or not they disclosed. Among subjects with HIV-negative partners, 10 of 10 (100%) disclosers reported protected sex versus 30 of 31 (96.8%) of non- disclosers (p = 0.76, odds ratios not calculated due to small number of subjects engaging in unprotected sex). Among subjects whose partner’s HIV serostatus was un- known, 10 of 11 (90.0%) disclosers reported protected sex versus 67 of 80 (83.8%) of non-disclosers (p = 0.54; OR 1.94, 95% CI [0.23, 16.5]; adjusted OR 1.74, 95% CI [0.20, 18.2]) (Table 2). Of note, subjects with HIV-positive part- ners were less likely to report protected sex overall (20 of 33, 60.6%) compared to those with HIV negative (82 of 96, 85.4%) or unknown (41 of 45, 91.1%) partners (p = .001). There was no association between disclosure and pro- tected sex among other subgroups of age or partner type.
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Barriers and facilitators of linkage to HIV care among HIV infected young Chinese men who have sex with men: a qualitative study

Barriers and facilitators of linkage to HIV care among HIV infected young Chinese men who have sex with men: a qualitative study

encouraged and reminded them to receive HIV care, thereby providing psychological and spiritual comfort. A participant (JN04) described: “My friend helped me a lot. … He reminded me some things that I didn’t know. … He told me some things that were helpful for me. It’s a kind of comfort, improving me. … At least, I obtained comfort spiritually. Sometimes if only me, I really didn’t want to come [to CDC]”. Friendships provided multi- functional support, not only reminding him but also supporting him both spiritually and psychologically. Another participant (JN05) shared similar experiences describing: “He [a friend] enlightened me. We chatted, had food and played together. … Gradually I calmed down. … He has a lot of knowledge and explained to me. …Gradually I got to know that it’s not so terrible, and then I changed slowly. … I trusted him and thought it should be nothing more than a diagnosis. …At that time I have ac- cepted it and tried to have a change.” Friends and peers were able to not only share HIV related knowledge and in- formation about services, but also provide companionship, which is crucial for HIV-infected MSM to link to HIV care.
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A cross sectional study of the relationship between sexual compulsivity and unprotected anal intercourse among men who have sex with men in shanghai, China

A cross sectional study of the relationship between sexual compulsivity and unprotected anal intercourse among men who have sex with men in shanghai, China

This survey explored the relationships between sexual compulsivity and different types of UAI among MSM in Shanghai, China. The prevalence rates for different types of UAI among participants were 50.9% (UAI with regular sex partners), 42.8% (UAI with non-regular sex part- ners), and 55.1% (UAI with commercial sex partners). These statistics are in line with previous study [42, 45– 49], indicating that the prevalence rate of UAI with regu- lar sex partners is higher than the prevalence rate of UAI with non-regular sex partners. The findings also showed that the association between sexual compulsivity and UAI varied according to partner type. In other words, sexual compulsivity was significantly associated with UAI in general, UAI with non-regular sex partners, and UAI with commercial sex partners. No significant association was observed between sexual compulsivity and UAI with regular sex partners. This result is consist- ent with findings from several previous studies, suggest- ing that individuals who exhibit a greater degree of sexual compulsivity are more likely to engage in UAI with casual sex partners than those who exhibit less sex- ual compulsivity [17, 23, 32–34, 56]. In addition, we in- vestigated potential mediators of the relationships between sexual compulsivity and UAI, UAINP, UAICP, and failed to find any significant mediation effect. More research is warranted to understand whether substance use before sex mediates the association between sexual compulsivity and UAI in Chinese MSM.
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Motivators and barriers for HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Sweden

Motivators and barriers for HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Sweden

The factor analysis of reasons for never having been tested for HIV (subject to item ratio 623/20 = 31) suggested that the twenty items should be grouped into nine factors (Table 4), the majority of which showed a low correlation between them. The nine-factor solution accounted for 89 percent of the variance in the data. Four of the factors were single-item factors. Two of these indicated that the participants did not consider themselves to need an HIV test: 1) no risk taking and 2) have not thought of it. The other two single-item factors were both related to a lack of easily accessible test services: 3) having been denied HIV test and 4) do not know where to get tested. For analytical purposes, these last two factors can be placed under the same umbrella as two other factors also relating to test service structure and availability: 5) concerns related to confidentiality and being recognized by staff or other visitors combined with not being monogamous (possibly related to the worries of being recognized by other visitors) and 6) test services’ locations and opening hours. The remaining three factors could all be associated with anxiety and fear related to a potential positive test result. Factor 7 comprised six items, including several items related to the participant’s own health but also to fear of social
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Healthcare providers’ attitudes towards care for men who have sex with men (MSM) in Malawi

Healthcare providers’ attitudes towards care for men who have sex with men (MSM) in Malawi

Our study is subject to some limitations. It targeted selected health professions schools and health facilities within Lilongwe city. Secondly we only managed to elicit views of participants from the Christian faith not by design, although religion was not an inclusion criterion for this study. Findings may therefore only apply to the context in which data were obtained. Views expressed in these findings reflect those of the few healthcare pro- viders and students interviewed and raise important questions regarding the transferability of the findings to the entire health professionals community in Malawi. It is worth noting that qualitative studies do not attempt to generalise findings. However, the description of accept- ability to provide HIV related health services among health service providers already in service, final year health professions students and faculty as elicited in this study could be valid in another setting with similar context.
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Demographic and Sexual Behavior Characteristics of Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) Registered in a Targeted Intervention (TI) Program in India

Demographic and Sexual Behavior Characteristics of Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) Registered in a Targeted Intervention (TI) Program in India

This paper (NACO/SIMU/NDAP/2015/09) was written as part of the National Data Analysis Plan (NDAP), an initiative of the Strategic Information Management Unit of National AIDS Control Organization (NACO), Min- istry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. We would like to thank the various divisions of NACO and State AIDS Control Organization (SACS) that have collected and maintained the program data. This paper was conceptualized, developed and finalized by the author, under the guidance of mentors (senior public health experts) and the NDAP Unit, NACO. The Knowledge Network project of the Population Council, which is a grantee of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation though Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative, has supported the scientific writing, reviewing, editing and finalization of this paper. This project was also supported by NACO’s other development partners, which include Center for Diseases Control (CDC), World Health Organization-In- dia, FHI-360, and John Snow India. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors, and do not nec- essarily reflect the views of NACO.
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Are Men Who Have Sex With Men Safe Blood Donors?

Are Men Who Have Sex With Men Safe Blood Donors?

8 Unreported deferrable risks were defined as transfusion-transmissible viral infection risk behaviours that would have de- ferred a prospective donor from giving blood if reported during the screening process. Unreported deferrable risks for men included: having a positive HIV test, been diagnosed with AIDS, used injected drugs or illegal steroids [IDU], was born in a country where HIV-1 Group O viruses are endemic; since 1977, had sex with a man or has taken money or drugs for sex; in the past year had sex, with a prostitute, with an IDU, or with a recipient of clotting factor concentrates; or in the past year, had a positive test for syphilis, was treated for syphilis/gonorrhoea, had a blood transfusion, received a transplant, was struck by a sharp instrument or a needle that contained someone else’s blood, or was jailed for seventy-two continuous hours. Sanchez, supra note 30 at 06.
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Socialising and sexual health: an evaluation of the needs of gay, bisexual men and men who have sex with men (MSM) in Sheffield

Socialising and sexual health: an evaluation of the needs of gay, bisexual men and men who have sex with men (MSM) in Sheffield

Influences on practices around safe sex include alcohol and/or drug use, the availability of condoms, and assumptions and perceptions of risk. The latter may be made on the base of appearance, age, or ethnicity, for instance, with evidence to suggest that men are aware of safer sex issues when having sex with strangers. Men may, however, be perhaps overly confident, or “complacent” as one participant noted, when in a relationship, or of possible more concern when they ‘know’ the person, either though previous acquaintance or via social networks. This perhaps suggests concerning beliefs around the ability to ‘see’ sexual health risks in a person. Related to these ‘risk assessments’, results from the UK’s Gay Men’s Sex Survey (GMSS) carried out in 2006 highlighted that 74% of respondents expected a HIV positive man to disclose his status prior to having sex (91% among those UK respondents aged under twenty, and 82% among respondents from Sheffield). This is a concern “because around a third of people with HIV do not know they have it and because many people who do know they have HIV will not tell sexual partners before sex” (Weatherburn et al, 2008: 36). The authors noted that this level of trust has increased in the period 2002 – 2006, which they speculate may be due to criminal prosecutions of people with HIV passing on their infection, resulting in people believing HIV positive men will disclose their status.
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Screening for Anal Dysplasia in HIV Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men By Anal Cytology, Human Papillomavirus Testing and Anoscopy

Screening for Anal Dysplasia in HIV Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men By Anal Cytology, Human Papillomavirus Testing and Anoscopy

tient clinic of the Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. HIV-infected MSM were asked to partici- pate. All patients provided written informed consent be- fore inclusion in the study. Inclusion started in March 2008. Demographic and clinical information was col- lected by using a standardized questionnaire or was re- trieved from the patient’s medical file. In each patient who consented with anoscopy a clinician-collected anal swab was taken for cytological examination and HPV DNA testing. The study was approved by the Institution- al Review Board.

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HSV suppression reduces seminal HIV-1 levels in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected men who have sex with men.

HSV suppression reduces seminal HIV-1 levels in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected men who have sex with men.

The earliest reports of interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1 infections were from the 1980s, including among men who have sex with men (MSM) 1 . Recently, several studies have shown that daily suppressive antiviral therapy for HSV reduces plasma, cervical and rectal HIV-1 levels in HIV-1 and HSV-2 infected adults 2-5 ; a clinical trial to assess the efficacy of this approach for reduction of sexual transmission of HIV-1 is ongoing 6 . Plasma HIV-1 level has been demonstrated to be a significant biologic marker of HIV-1 transmission risk from an HIV-infected partner 7, 8 . Semen is the main biologic fluid for exposure from HIV-infected men to their female and male partners during insertive sex 9 . However, a direct relationship between seminal HIV-1 level and transmission has not been shown in part due to difficulties in conducting sufficiently large, prospective studies of HIV-1 discordant couples with collection of blood and genital samples 7 .
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Anal Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in HIV Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men by Geographical Origin, Age, and Cytological Status in a Spanish Cohort

Anal Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in HIV Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men by Geographical Origin, Age, and Cytological Status in a Spanish Cohort

HPV DNA detection and genotyping. Anal samples were collected with a cytobrush and placed into Digene specimen transport medium (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), stored at ⫺ 20°C, and shipped to the Retro- viruses and Papillomavirus Unit of the National Centre for Microbiology in Madrid for testing. DNA was extracted from a 200- ␮ l aliquot of the original anal sample using an automatic DNA extractor (BioRobot M48 Robotic Workstation; Qiagen). For quality control, 10 samples were in- cluded in each extraction run, as well as one negative control (PCR-qual- ity water) and one positive control (SiHa cells infected with HPV16). Anal HPV infection and genotyping were determined through the Linear Array HPV genotyping test (Roche Molecular Systems, Inc., Pleasanton, CA), which detects 37 HPV types. Human ␤ -globin gene fragment detection was used as an internal control. The results were considered satisfactory if there were low and high ␤ -globin levels or if at least one HPV type was detected. As the Linear Array HPV52 probe cross-reacts with HPV33, HPV35, and HPV58, in samples in which any of these HPV types were detected, an additional HPV52 infection cannot be excluded. Therefore, in these samples, a specific HPV52 PCR system designed in the E6 gene was performed (12). For the analysis, the HPV types were classified on the basis of their association with cancer using the Muñoz et al. (13) classifi- cation. HPV16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, and -59 were considered HR-HPV types, HPV6, -11, -40, -42, -54, -61, -70, -72, and -81, and CP6108 were considered low-risk (LR)-HPV types, HPV26, -53, -66, -68, -73, and -82 were considered probably high-risk (PHR)-HPV types, and HPV55, -62, -64, -67, -69, -71, -83, and -84, and IS39 were considered undetermined risk (UR)-HPV types.
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Knowledge of HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases among men who have sex with men in Finland

Knowledge of HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases among men who have sex with men in Finland

Little was known about Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). Pre Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) was not asked about, while not available at the time of the study. One in four (26.5%) knew that PEP attempts to stop HIV infec- tion taking place after a person is exposed to the virus, A similar amount (25.4%) knew that PEP should be started as soon as possible after exposure, and around one in six (15.2%) knew that PEP is a one month course of anti-HIV drugs. Only 1.3% of respondents had been treated with PEP. Overall, 13.5% of the respondents (n = 279) responded correctly to the statements about PEP. Of the respondents who were diagnosed as HIV-positive (34: n = 65), just over half (52.3%) responded correctly to the PEP statements. The corresponding figure for HIV-negative re- spondents was 13.6% (167: n = 1,227).
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Should Men who have sex with Men be allowed to donate blood in Israel?

Should Men who have sex with Men be allowed to donate blood in Israel?

There is an ongoing debate worldwide regarding per- manent versus temporal deferral and receiving blood donations from persons with defined high risk behavior [1, 2], such as men who have sex with men (MSM) [3, 4]. The rationale and the benefits of such deferral/exclusion for MSM [5 – 10] have been questioned by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender advocacy organizations seeking to change the current policy, in the light of technological advances in screening using Nucleic Acid Testing. This testing method enables a higher detection rate of contami- nated blood by improving the tests sensitivity for the detection of causative agents of Transfusion Transmitted Infection (TTI) such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B (HBV) or Hepatitis C (HCV) and by reducing the length of the Window Period, during which detection is impossible [11, 12]. Injection drug users
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