Top PDF House of Commons: Debate pack: Number CDP-2017-0156, 06 September 2017: 16 to 19 Education Funding

House of Commons: Debate pack: Number CDP-2017-0156, 06 September 2017: 16 to 19 Education Funding

House of Commons: Debate pack: Number CDP-2017-0156, 06 September 2017: 16 to 19 Education Funding

That this House notes that the protection in cash terms for funding per student for 16-19 year olds announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in November 2015 is likely to equate to a real terms cut of 8 per cent over the next four years after inflation is taken into account; further notes that funding for 16-19 year olds had already been cut by 14 per cent in real terms between 2010 and 2015; expresses its serious concern about the deleterious impact of these cuts on sixth form colleges, school sixth forms and further education colleges, with 72 per cent of sixth form colleges already having dropped courses and 81 per cent increased class sizes; and welcomes the campaigning by the National Union of Teachers, the National Union of Students, the University and College Union and others who are calling on the Government to invest in 16-19 education and not to subject young people to further damaging cuts.
Show more

31 Read more

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-2018-0167, 29 June 2018: Spending of the Department for Education

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-2018-0167, 29 June 2018: Spending of the Department for Education

Most 16-19 education funding is allocated to individual providers (e.g. school sixth forms, sixth form colleges and general further education colleges) by the Education and Skills Funding Agency. The majority of each provider’s annual allocation is determined using a national funding formula which was introduced from 2013-14. Additional elements of funding are then allocated outside of the formula, including, for example, funding for high needs students, and for some student support schemes (e.g. Dance and Drama Awards).
Show more

18 Read more

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-0167, 6 October 2017: Education funding in South Liverpool

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-0167, 6 October 2017: Education funding in South Liverpool

For academies, we collect cumulative budgetary surplus data at trust level – in 2015/16 the total number of single academy trusts (SATs) in cumulative surplus was 1,735 and the total number of multi academy trusts (MATs) in cumulative surplus was 1,084. The median cumulative surplus for academy trusts (of which a higher proportion are secondary schools than is the case for maintained schools) was £364,000 for SATs and £664,000 for MATs. The total number of schools in England with an in year deficit in each of the last five years can be found in the table attached (Annex A). It is important to note that an in year deficit is not in itself a cause for concern unless it is symptomatic of a trend towards a cumulative deficit. Many schools will draw on their reserves for a range of planned reasons – for example to spend on capital projects.
Show more

19 Read more

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-0163, 2 July 2018: Speech, language and communication support for children

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-0163, 2 July 2018: Speech, language and communication support for children

Separate consultations were conducted on high needs funding. The national funding formula for schools and high needs, published by the Department for Education in September 2017, described how the Government intended to proceed following those consultations. Local authorities would receive high needs funding through a national formula derived from, among other factors, a basic unit of per-pupil funding for pupils in specialist SEN provision, historic spend, and also proxy measures such as population, school attainment, and numbers of children in bad health. More detail is provided in chapter 4 of the Policy Document.
Show more

38 Read more

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP 2016-0195, 31 October 2016: Funding of West Sussex schools

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP 2016-0195, 31 October 2016: Funding of West Sussex schools

I am setting this out now so that local authorities can begin the process of setting the budgets of schools in their area and that this can be concluded in time for the start of the coming financial year. I am also confirming that, for 2017-18, we will retain the current minimum funding guarantee for schools, so that no school can face a funding reduction of more than 1.5% per pupil next year in what it receives through the local authority funding formula. To ensure that local authorities can start planning their budgets for next year with certainty, I do not intend to proceed, for 2017-18, with proposals to create a new central schools block, allow local flexibility on the minimum funding guarantee or to ring-fence the schools block within the dedicated schools grant. These will be covered, for 2018-19 and beyond, in my response to the first stage consultation in the autumn. I will shortly publish the Education Funding Agency’s operational guide to schools funding in 2017-18, and send the draft Authority Proforma Tool to authorities.
Show more

24 Read more

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-0044, 26 February 2018: Funding higher education

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-0044, 26 February 2018: Funding higher education

everyone. As outlined in the Industrial Strategy, the review will consider a range of specific issues within post-18 education. The government is already fundamentally reforming the post-16 education system to give all young people the opportunity to fulfil their potential and deliver a better future for our country. A key principle of the reform agenda is to improve the quality of technical education provision to deliver young people with the skills employers need both locally and nationally. New T-levels, with content designed by employers, will support them into skilled employment or progression to higher education. T-levels will be backed by over £500 million annually by the time the programme is rolled out fully, and we are implementing apprenticeship reforms to continue to improve the quality of apprenticeships for all. Our commitment to the 16 to 19 sector has contributed to the current record high proportion of 16 to 18 year olds who are participating in education or apprenticeships.
Show more

22 Read more

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-2017-0059, 27 February 2017: LGBT history month

House of Commons Library: Debate pack: Number CDP-2017-0059, 27 February 2017: LGBT history month

All schools are required by law to have a behaviour policy with measures to tackle bullying among pupils. Schools are free to develop their own anti-bullying strategies but they are held clearly to account for their effectiveness through Ofsted. We trust schools to decide for themselves what training their staff need in order to be able to do this effectively. However, we know that individuals who are, or perceived to be, homosexual, bisexual or transgender are disproportionately affected by bullying. In 2015, research by the UCL Institute of Education identified that 56% of young LGB people aged 14-16 were bullied compared to 45% of their heterosexual peers. To help schools to tackle bullying and support victims, in September 2016 the Department for Education and the Government Equalities Office announced £4.4m of funding for 10 projects to tackle bullying, including £2.8 million for projects tackling specifically homophobic, transphobic and biphobic bullying. This
Show more

12 Read more

House of Commons Lbrary: Briefing paper: Number 7375, 28 February 2017: School buildings and capital funding (England)

House of Commons Lbrary: Briefing paper: Number 7375, 28 February 2017: School buildings and capital funding (England)

I am also aware that many of our existing school buildings across the country are in desperate need of repair. I am grateful to hon. Members from all parties who have shown me and my colleagues schools in their constituencies that desperately need investment. The energy and skill with which so many colleagues have lobbied underlines how effectively so many hon. Members across the House represent the most needy in their constituencies.

12 Read more

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

Under the reformed system for special educational needs, where parents and the local authority agree that home education is the right provision for a child with an EHC plan, the plan should make clear that the child will be educated at home. If it does, then the local authority must arrange the special educational provision set out in the plan. Where a child’s EHC plan names a school and the parents decide to educate them at home, the local authority does not have to make the special educational needs provision set out in the plan provided that it is satisfied that the arrangements made by the parents are suitable. The authority must review the plan annually “to assure itself that the provision set out in it continues to be appropriate and that the child’s SEN continue to be met.” 33
Show more

18 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

‘transition year’ where tailored support will be provided based on their prior attainment. Routes will then extend up to higher skill levels, with the Institute for Apprenticeships maintaining a register of technical qualifications at levels 4 and 5 which are eligible for Government-backed student loans. The five National Colleges will focus on delivering technical education at levels 4 to 6 in sectors crucial to the Government’s productivity agenda. In addition, a network of Institutes of Technology will be created across the country, likely building on existing infrastructure, to provide technical education in STEM subjects at levels 3, 4 and 5.
Show more

24 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7581, 12 July 2017: Children: Introduction of 30 hours of free childcare in September 2017 (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7581, 12 July 2017: Children: Introduction of 30 hours of free childcare in September 2017 (England)

Shortages of childminders may also compromise the Government’s plans to offer parents additional hours of free early education in 2017 … While many parents will want to take their extra free hours in the same setting, it is uncertain whether all providers will be able to accommodate additional parental demands. At present 58 per cent of three and four year olds receive their free early education in public sector provision, most usually in nursery and reception classes attached to primary schools. Limited physical space for expansion, a lack of capital funding and the ‘baby-boom’ – leading to competing demands for 5-11 place growth – may act to prevent schools from expanding their nurseries. Without premises expansion, it is likely that many schools will be unable to offer more than 15 hours of free early education per week, and probably would not want to do so, as this would mean halving the number of children to whom they offer high quality early education places. For example, a school
Show more

18 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8050, 13 September 2017: New early years funding formula from 2017-18, including maintained nursery schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8050, 13 September 2017: New early years funding formula from 2017-18, including maintained nursery schools (England)

such as delivering teacher-led provision. The government recognises that MNS bear costs over and above other providers. For this reason, the government will provide supplementary funding of £55 million a year to local authorities for the duration of this Parliament. This will enable local authorities to maintain their current funding levels for MNS during the wider changes in early years funding, and ensure that the important contribution these schools make to the social mobility of young children in disadvantaged areas and the wider early years sector continues. As the universal base rate is introduced, we will allow local authorities to continue to provide a higher level of funding to maintained nursery schools. We remain committed to consulting in regard to the future role of maintained nursery schools and how best to secure their high quality provision for the longer term. 35
Show more

13 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number SN05871, 16 August 2017: Youth unemployment statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number SN05871, 16 August 2017: Youth unemployment statistics

Not adjusting for seasonal effects, 157,100 people aged 18-24 were claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance or were claiming Universal Credit and required to seek work in July 2017. This is 2,200 fewer than a year ago. These numbers are, however, highly seasonal and are impacted by the ongoing rollout of Universal Credit. Under Universal Credit, a broader span of claimants are required to look for work than under Jobseeker's Allowance. This has the effect of increasing the number of unemployed claimants compared to the previous system. Additionally, Universal Credit appears to follow a different seasonal pattern to Jobseeker’s Allowance.
Show more

6 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

16-19 education funding is allocated to providers by the ESFA and its predecessor bodies. The majority of each provider’s annual allocation is determined using a national funding formula and estimated student numbers. Additional elements of funding are then allocated outside of the formula, including, for example, funding for high needs students, and for some student support schemes (e.g. Dance and Drama Awards). Some 16-19 funding is not allocated to institutions but is instead held and managed centrally (e.g. funding for the vulnerable student bursary). What does this briefing cover?
Show more

30 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 28 March 2017: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 28 March 2017: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

In considering the outcomes of reviews it is important that college governors give careful weight to the long term sustainability of their institution. This will need to take account of their legal duties generally, including under charity law and their legal obligations as charity trustees. The Secretary of State retains powers to intervene in colleges where there are substantial concerns that the institution is being mismanaged or significantly underperforming. We expect institutions to take action, in light of the findings of a review, to ensure that they are resilient and able to respond to future funding priorities. Ultimately we expect the funding agencies, LEPs and national partners only to fund or support institutions that have taken action to ensure they can provide a good quality offer to learners and employers, which is financially sustainable for the long term. 28
Show more

17 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The initial teaching and learning funding allocations for adult further education (FE) and skills in England fell from a 2010-11 baseline of £3.18 billion to £2.94 billion in 2015-16, a reduction of 8% in cash terms or 14% in real terms. The allocation for 2015-16 fell further as a result of the 2015 Summer Budget, which reduced the non-apprenticeship part of the Adult Skills Budget (ASB) by an additional 3.9%. While funding for community learning and offender learning stayed fairly constant over the period, ASB funding declined by 29% in cash terms between 2010-11 and 2015-16 – this in part connected to the replacement of grant funding with loan funding for some learners from 2013-14 onwards. The minimum annual funding allocated to adult apprenticeships increased by 113% between 2010-11 and 2015-16, meaning that non-apprenticeship funding comprised a smaller proportion of the reduced ASB.
Show more

18 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8110, 17th October 2017: 2017 UK Youth Parliament

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8110, 17th October 2017: 2017 UK Youth Parliament

At present, families with young carers may be able to get additional help through the Severe Disability Premium (SDP), worth £62.45 a week (2017-18 rate). SDP is not a benefit in its own right but is an additional amount payable with certain means-tested benefits including income- related Employment and Support Allowance (ESA). SDP is intended to give additional help to those severely disabled people who, because they live independently and do not have someone caring for them who receives Carer’s Allowance, are most likely to rely on bought-in care. SDP is not payable if there are other “non-dependants” residing with the person, but for these purposes anyone under 18, or aged 18-19 and qualifying for child benefit, does not count.
Show more

67 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

1.31 Sexual orientation and what is taught in schools is an area of concern for some parents. Schools that liaise closely with parents when developing their sex and relationship education policy and programme should be able to reassure parents of the content of the programme and the context in which it will be presented. 1.32 Schools need to be able to deal with homophobic bullying. Guidance issued by the Department (Social Inclusion: Pupil Support Circular 10/99) dealt with the unacceptability of and emotional distress and harm caused by bullying in whatever form – be it racial, as a result of a pupil’s appearance, related to sexual orientation or for any other reason. […]
Show more

25 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

20 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7946, 11 April 2017: Millennials

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7946, 11 April 2017: Millennials

The prolonged period of low interest rates since 2008 does not only affect defined benefit schemes (requiring firms to divert more money into funding these schemes since the return on their investments is lower) but also increases the cost to younger workers of providing for their own retirement. Since they are receiving a lower rate of return on their pension savings, workers must save more in order to receive the same level of income that would have been expected under interest rates pre-recession. The OECD outlines the effects on defined contribution schemes:

52 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...

Related subjects