Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

Agencies that specialise in temporary workers usually retain the temporary agency worker on their payroll. Therefore these companies can have payrolls over the £3million threshold despite small number of staff working directly for the company. The REC argues that this means that small to medium sized recruiters, specialising in temporary agency workers, will be unfairly captured by the levy. The REC also argues that opportunities to take advantage of apprenticeships are limited for recruitment agencies specialising in temporary employees. This is because apprenticeships tend to last longer than agency workers are contracted for.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

6. This chapter sets out our proposals to increase the number of good school places by lifting the restrictions on selection, but at the same time requiring selective schools to play a greater role in raising standards at other schools. In doing so, we do not propose a re-introduction of the binary or tripartite system of the past or a simple expansion of existing selective institutions. We propose that selective schools should be asked to contribute to non- selective schooling in certain ways, ensuring the expansion of good selective education alongside the creation of new good school places in nonselective schools. We believe that these proposals will make grammar schools engines of academic and social achievement for all pupils, whatever their background, wherever they are from and whatever their ability. 37
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

In its February 2016 report, Training new teachers, the National Audit Office stated that the DfE had evidence of a link between bursaries and the number of ITT applications, but that this did not extend to the impact of bursaries on the number of trainees who go on to qualify and teach. 32 In its subsequent report, the Public Accounts Committee stated that it had not been persuaded that bursaries were delivering value for money and recommended that the Government should “evaluate properly, as a matter of urgency…, whether bursaries…lead to more, better quality teachers in classrooms, including whether the money could be more effectively spent in other ways, such as on retention measures.” 33 As noted in section 2.6 above, this call for more evidence on the effectiveness of bursaries was echoed by the Institute for Fiscal Studies in its 2016 report on the costs and benefits of ITT routes. 34
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

2.1 Direct funding through the funding council The Secretary of State writes to HEFCE around the turn of each year to set out funding, priorities, student numbers and related matters for the following financial year. Occasionally these letters cover more than one year and sometimes revised versions are published. The most recent full funding letter was published at the end of February 2017. It covered funding in 2017-18 and gave indicative allocations for the following year. All these funding letters from the mid-1990s onwards can be found at: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/funding/annallocns/Archive/
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 07345, 20 January 2017: Counter-extremism policy in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 07345, 20 January 2017: Counter-extremism policy in English schools

In response to a Parliamentary Question on 14 June 2014, Lord Nash explained how the proposed new regulations differed from those that existed previously: The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash) (Con): My Lords, independent schools, academies and free schools are required to encourage pupils to respect fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs. That provision was brought in by this Government. We plan to strengthen this requirement so that those schools will have to promote British values. Ofsted will also be asked to change the inspection framework to reflect that expectation so that maintained schools are also held to account on the same basis. 54
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07980, 19 June 2017: 'SATs' and primary school assessment in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07980, 19 June 2017: 'SATs' and primary school assessment in England

What did the 2015 Government say in response to criticism about the 2016 SATs? On 19 October 2016, Education Secretary Justine Greening said in a Statement that the then Government was committed to a period of stability in primary assessment, and would consult further in 2017. No new national assessments would be introduced before 2018-19, nor would planned resits for year seven (first year of secondary schooling) who hadn’t reached the expected standards at the end of primary schooling. The grammar, spelling and punctuation tests aimed at children in year two (age six or seven) would remain non-statutory, meaning schools did not have to administer them.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

1. The School System in England This briefing offers a short introduction to the types of state-funded schools in England and how they differ from each other. Schools policy is a devolved area, and different arrangements are in place in the other countries of the UK.

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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7905, 22 January 2017: Adult ESOL in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7905, 22 January 2017: Adult ESOL in England

The argument for an ESOL strategy The report highlighted the funding reductions to the ESOL sector since 2007 and argued that waiting lists were “at an all-time high” and that “people who want to learn English find that both entitlement to learning and the number of places have dramatically reduced” 57 It also contended that the Government’s emphasis on integration had “not translated into a coherent strategy for ESOL provision in England” and that ESOL policy suffered from a lack of co-ordination, with the Department for Education in the lead, but the Department for Work and Pensions, the Home Office and the Department for Communities and Local Government also having roles. 58
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

We will establish new institutes of technology, backed by leading employers and linked to leading universities, in every major city in England. They will provide courses at degree level and above, specialising in technical disciplines, such as STEM, whilst also providing higher-level apprenticeships and bespoke courses for employers. They will enjoy the freedoms that make our universities great, including eligibility for public funding for productivity and skills research, and access to loans and grants for their students. They will be able to gain royal charter status and regius professorships in technical education. Above all, they will become anchor institutions for local, regional and national industry, providing sought-after skills to support the economy,
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

6. This chapter sets out our proposals to increase the number of good school places by lifting the restrictions on selection, but at the same time requiring selective schools to play a greater role in raising standards at other schools. In doing so, we do not propose a re-introduction of the binary or tripartite system of the past or a simple expansion of existing selective institutions. We propose that selective schools should be asked to contribute to non- selective schooling in certain ways, ensuring the expansion of good selective education alongside the creation of new good school places in nonselective schools. We believe that these proposals will make grammar schools engines of academic and social achievement for all pupils, whatever their background, wherever they are from and whatever their ability. 40
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

€18,000 for a two-year course. Future Finance Loan Corporation operates the scheme for masters students in and out of the UK. Brexit Following the EU referendum on 23 June 2016, the Government announced that EU students applying for a place at an English higher education institution in the 2017-18 academic year will continue to be eligible for the same funding and support as they are now, and that their eligibility will continue throughout their course, even if the UK exits the EU during that period. The Government has stated that it is working to ensure that EU students applying for a place in 2018-19 will have information about their eligibility for funding “well in advance” of the application round opening in September 2017.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

In a Westminster Hall debate on school transport in June 2015, the Schools Minister Nick Gibb expanded on the Government position: We believe that [local authorities] are best placed to determine how resources should be used in the areas that they serve and to balance the demands of a broad range of discretionary travel against their budget priorities. If we were to remove this discretion from local authorities’ responsibilities, it would hugely increase the number of eligible children at a substantial cost to the taxpayer. Therefore, it is much more practical and helpful to allow local authorities to continue to make these important decisions locally, but they still need to make the right decisions locally. 12
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

In a Westminster Hall debate on AS levels and A levels in April 2013, the then Schools Minister, David Laws, explained why the Government were making the changes: ...We want to give students a better experience of post-16 study, ensuring they are studying for rigorous qualifications that will provide them with the right skills and knowledge to allow them to progress. Students currently start A-levels in September and then they immediately start preparing for examinations in January. They and their teachers have spent too much time thinking about exams and re-sitting them, encouraging in some cases a “learn and forget” approach. A student taking A-level maths would need to sit six exams: three papers for their AS-level, and three for their A2. The old rules allowed multiple re-sitting of those papers, so a student might sit some papers in January, and if they wanted to improve their grades they could re-sit them in June and again the following year, while sitting and then re-sitting their A2 papers. In 2010, 74% of maths A-level students re-sat at least one paper.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

In a Westminster Hall debate on AS levels and A levels in April 2013, the then Schools Minister, David Laws, explained why the Government were making the changes: ...We want to give students a better experience of post-16 study, ensuring they are studying for rigorous qualifications that will provide them with the right skills and knowledge to allow them to progress. Students currently start A-levels in September and then they immediately start preparing for examinations in January. They and their teachers have spent too much time thinking about exams and re-sitting them, encouraging in some cases a “learn and forget” approach. A student taking A-level maths would need to sit six exams: three papers for their AS-level, and three for their A2. The old rules allowed multiple re-sitting of those papers, so a student might sit some papers in January, and if they wanted to improve their grades they could re-sit them in June and again the following year, while sitting and then re-sitting their A2 papers. In 2010, 74% of maths A-level students re-sat at least one paper.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8110, 17th October 2017: 2017 UK Youth Parliament

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8110, 17th October 2017: 2017 UK Youth Parliament

The regulated fare increase in England for 2017 is 1.9% (based on an RPI +/-0 formula); the total fare increase was 2.3%. This disguises variations across different routes. Almost without exception, when the annual fare increases are announced every year passenger groups express concerns that significant increases could ‘price people off the railways’ and put a strain on those who use the railways to commute to work, particularly into and out of London. However, it has been the policy of successive governments to rebalance the funding of the railways between passengers and taxpayers: reducing the relative contribution of the latter. A consequence of this is higher fares. The train companies themselves are keen to rebut claims that they are ‘profiteering’ off higher fares, noting that fares income is spent on upgrades and
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7436, 2 February 2017: Reform of support for healthcare students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7436, 2 February 2017: Reform of support for healthcare students in England

Placing new nursing, midwifery and AHP students on the student support system will, in general, provide more living cost support for students during their studies, as the student support system is substantially more than the combination of means-tested and non-means-tested bursaries. However, these new arrangements would increase the time period of student loan repayments students have upon graduation. Concerns about the impact on participation could be mitigated by evidence that increases in fees in the wider higher education system did not have a detrimental impact on application numbers for university, including among lower income groups. In fact, statistics show that in the wider system students are now more likely to apply to university than they were in 2010. It is important to note that the policy would place nursing, midwifery and AHP students on the same student support system as the general student population. There is a built in protection for the lowest earners whereby loan repayments cease where earnings drop below £21,000.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

David Laws: We recognise some smaller schools will face particular challenges in implementing universal infant free school meals. We have therefore allocated an extra £22.5 million transitional funding in 2014-15 to help schools with 150 pupils or fewer to implement the policy. Each qualifying small school received a minimum of £3,000. This is on top of the £2.30 per meal taken which all schools have been given for their newly eligible infants. 24

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

The DfE has stated that regulations and statutory guidance to implement these plans will be subject to full public consultation later in 7 However, the DfE has stated that clarification is being sought on “the age at which a young person may have the right to make their own decisions,” and that a blanket right for parents to withdraw their child from sex education is no longer consistent with English caselaw (or with the ECHR and UNCRC). The outcome will be set out in regulations which will be subject to consultation and debate. See Department for Education, Policy Statement: Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education, and Personal, Social, Health, and Economic Education, March 2017
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 June 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 June 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

In its report on the work of the Committee during the 2010-15 Parliament, the Education Committee stated: 39. When we returned to this issue a year after the publication of our report, it was clear to us that careers advice in schools was not improving, so we followed up our inquiry with a one-off session with the Secretary of State in January 2015. Drawing on this session, we recommended in our report on apprenticeships that the Government urgently review the incentives for schools to provide good quality careers advice and recognise that the mantra of “trusting schools” does not work when the interests of schools and young people are not aligned. This remains a work in
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049, 29 January 2019: Postgraduate loans in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049, 29 January 2019: Postgraduate loans in England

repayment of loans by EU students in an observation paper published in December 2014: One assumption to which our findings are sensitive is that of repayment compliance. In 2012/13, 13.5% of new postgraduate students in the UK were EU domiciled. If the same proportion of EU students took out loans, but the government were unable to collect any repayments from these students, we estimate that the RAB charge would increase to 12.6%. This is another important consideration for the policy consultation.

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