Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

Not all disadvantaged pupils currently attract funding. Some schools do not focus funding on disadvantaged pupils appropriately or use the most cost-effective interventions, and, in any event, the evidence base is still underdeveloped. Furthermore, the core school funding that the Pupil Premium supplements is not distributed on the basis of need. Most importantly, there is a risk that accountability and intervention mechanisms allow schools to waste money on ineffective activities for many years without effective challenge. As the impact of the Pupil Premium becomes clearer, the Department will need to review if it is investing the right amount in it, including whether spending more in this way could allow it to close the gap more quickly, generating wider savings for the taxpayer. 38
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House of Commons: Briefing Paper: School funding: Pupil Premium: 
Number 6700: 21 November 2016

House of Commons: Briefing Paper: School funding: Pupil Premium: Number 6700: 21 November 2016

The Department has already created a strong drive to improve support for disadvantaged pupils by targeting the Pupil Premium at schools on a rational basis; clearly communicating the funding’s objective; investing in research and sharing best practice; and empowering teachers to try new things. However, the Department, working with others, has more to do to optimise value for money. Not all disadvantaged pupils currently attract funding. Some schools do not focus funding on disadvantaged pupils appropriately or use the most cost-effective interventions, and, in any event, the evidence base is still underdeveloped. Furthermore, the core school funding that the Pupil Premium supplements is not distributed on the basis of need. Most importantly, there is a risk that accountability and intervention mechanisms allow schools to waste money on ineffective activities for many years without effective challenge. As the impact of the Pupil Premium becomes clearer, the Department will need to review if it is investing the right amount in it, including whether spending more in this way could allow it to close the gap more quickly, generating wider savings for the taxpayer. 38
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 5 April 2018: Schools meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 5 April 2018: Schools meals and nutritional standards (England)

Universal Credit, which will see five benefits combined into one, means the end of the current basis for determining free school meals and therefore Pupil Premium eligibility. The Department does not yet know how it will identify disadvantaged pupils following Universal Credit’s introduction, and there is relatively little time to find an answer. There has also been substantial variation in the level of under-claiming between local authorities. In 2013, in some areas more than 30% of eligible pupils did not take up their free school meals entitlement compared to 0% in other areas. The Department told us that it wanted to target local authorities where under-claiming was high, so that schools do not miss out on funding because parents fail to claim. 27
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

Reporting restrictions introduced by the Education Act 2002 prevent the publication of material that may lead to the identification of a teacher who has been accused by a pupil from the same school. This restriction, which includes publishing material on social network sites, applies until the accused is charged with an offence or until the Teaching Regulation Agency publishes information about an investigation. The guidance notes this restriction and states that it is important that schools make “every effort” to maintain confidentiality when an allegation is made. 84

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

Reporting restrictions introduced by the Education Act 2002 prevent the publication of material that may lead to the identification of a teacher who has been accused by a pupil from the same school. This restriction, which includes publishing material on social network sites, applies until the accused is charged with an offence. The guidance notes this restriction and states that it is important that schools make “every effort” to maintain confidentiality when an allegation is made. 72

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

Sustainability and accountability are also addressed through the broader elements of the strategy: it is vitally important that the money committed is spent well. Through the conditions of grant, schools are required to publish online for parents the details of their full PE and sport offer and the impact upon pupil attainment. This will strengthen the ability of parents to hold their children’s schools to account for the funding. The additional investment in primary school sport has also been ring-fenced, a unique position in school funding and one which demonstrates the importance we place on PE and sport in schools. 97
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

Lord Agnew of Oulton: Children who are educated at home can also be registered at school and attend school for part of the week. Such an arrangement is known as ‘flexi-schooling’. Schools are under no obligation to agree to such an arrangement, but some are happy to do so. Schools must enter a pupil on the admission register from the beginning of the first day that the pupil will attend the school; this will include a pupil who is flexi- schooled. Where a school has agreed to a flexi-schooling arrangement, the time a child spends being educated at home should be recorded as absence.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 18 June 2018: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 18 June 2018: Student Loan Statistics

But the expansion of higher education relies on funding being put onto a sustainable footing. The government must therefore ask graduates to meet more of the cost of their degrees once they are earning. From the 2016-17 academic year, maintenance grants will be replaced with maintenance loans for new students from England, paid back only when their earnings exceed £21,000 a year, saving £2.5 billion by 2020-21. To ensure that the long term costs of the student loan book remain affordable and transparent, the government will consult on freezing the loan repayment threshold for five years and review the discount rate applied to student loans and other transactions to bring it into line with the government’s long-term cost of borrowing.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 8538, 10 April 2019 : The review of university admissions

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 8538, 10 April 2019 : The review of university admissions

The minority of university offers are unconditional, but the share of all offers made that were recorded as unconditional has increased significantly, from 9.2 per cent in 2013, to 15.1 per cent in 2018. Most unconditional offers are made to older students, but the unconditional offer rate for 18 year olds has driven the overall increase in unconditional offers; up from less than 1% of offers to this age group in 2013, to 7.1% in 2018. 23% of 18 year olds received an unconditional offer in 2018, or 34% if all offers with any unconditional component are included. Unconditional offers are more common at universities with lower entry requirements. In 2013 just 16 universities had unconditional offer rates to 18 year olds of 1% or more. In 2018 this number had increased to 84.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 16 April 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 16 April 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

299,000 men aged 16-24 were unemployed in December 2018 to February 2019, a small increase on a year ago. The unemployment rate for men of this age was 13.1%, up slightly from 12.9% a year before. 194,000 women aged 16-24 were unemployed, down 40,000 from a year before. The unemployment rate for women aged 16-24 was 9.3%, compared to 11.1% a year before.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7049, 27 February 2018: Postgraduate loans in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7049, 27 February 2018: Postgraduate loans in England

1.154 Autumn Statement 2014 therefore introduces a new offer of income contingent loans for those under 30 years old wishing to undertake a postgraduate taught masters in any subject. These loans, of up to £10,000, are planned to be available from 2016-17 and will be repaid concurrently with undergraduate loans. The loans are designed so that, on average, individuals will repay in full, in recognition of the high private return to individuals, but they will beat commercial rates. The government will consult on the detail and will confirm the delivery plan. This is expected to benefit around 40,000 students, and enable around 10,000 more individuals to take advantage of the opportunity to undertake postgraduate study each year.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

Concerns have been raised regarding schools off-rolling pupils by pressurising their parents to educate them at home. For example, in a letter to the Public Accounts Committee in October 2018 the Chief Inspector of Schools, Amanda Spielman, stated that Ofsted had “a lot of anecdotal evidence that suggests that parents are home-educating their children under duress, to prevent exclusion.” She added that, while Ofsted accepts that home education is a legitimate choice and is often done well, often the parents of off-rolled children “do not have the capacity to provide a good standard of education.” 69
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number CBP 07345, 11 April 2018: Counter-extremism policy in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number CBP 07345, 11 April 2018: Counter-extremism policy in English schools

We, therefore, recommend that all organisations offering out-of-school-hours provision, as well as individuals offering private tution on a commercial basis, be required to register with[r]

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

Local authorities are required to ensure that children in their area with special educational needs (SEN) receive the support they need. The Children and Families Act 2014 provided for an overhaul of the system for identifying children and young people in England aged 0-25 with special educational needs (SEN), assessing their needs and making provision for them. The reforms to the system of support began to be implemented in September 2014, in a phased introduction planned to be completed in April 2018.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07148, 5 April 2019: The School Day and Year (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07148, 5 April 2019: The School Day and Year (England)

• compulsory schemes are much less popular than voluntary schemes amongst parents and school staff. But voluntary schemes can struggle to run economically and there are also adverse selection issues where those who may benefit the most – often the most deprived – would not attend. We suggest that it does so via an extended day premium, distributed on a per pupil basis, which schools can opt into receiving on the condition that they then run a longer day and which is mandatory for pupils within that school. Such a decision, with associated funding, would be analogous to opting in to Academy status.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

transition funding so that schools do not suffer abrupt changes to their funding straight away. We fund all 16-to-19 providers for study programmes of 600 hours per year for full-time students. That is sufficient for a study programme of three A-levels plus one AS-level, and up to 150 hours of enrichment activities, over a two- year study programme. There should be no need to cut those extra-curricular activities, which are such an important part of a rounded school education. In addition, as has been mentioned, we have, in 2013-14, increased the rate for larger programmes of study. For students who are studying four A-levels, the school will receive an extra £400 per pupil, and for those who are studying five A-levels, the school will receive an extra £800. 89
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper:  Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

The categorisation of most term-time holidays as unauthorised absence has been a contentious issue for some families, many of whom are concerned at the higher cost of holidays during school holiday periods. The Scottish Government has no control over the pricing decisions of holiday companies or flight operators. Our main focus is to encourage parents and pupils to recognise the value of learning and the pitfalls of disrupting learning for the pupil, the rest of the class and the teacher. It is for schools and education authorities to judge what sanctions, if any, they may wish to apply to unauthorised absence due to holidays. (p16)
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

In February 2017, the Education Committee published the report of its inquiry into teacher supply: Recruitment and retention of teachers. The report concluded that “schools face increasing challenges of teacher shortages, particularly within certain subjects and regions” and that rising pupil numbers and changes to accountability, such as the focus on English Baccalaureate subjects, “will exacerbate existing problems.” It stated that the Government is aware of the issues but “needs to identify a strategic, long-term plan to effectively address them.” The “failure of the National Teaching Service”, had, it added, left “a gap in the Government’s plans to tackle regional shortages.” 112
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

Sustainability and accountability are also addressed through the broader elements of the strategy: it is vitally important that the money committed is spent well. Through the conditions of grant, schools are required to publish online for parents the details of their full PE and sport offer and the impact upon pupil attainment. This will strengthen the ability of parents to hold their children’s schools to account for the funding. The additional investment in primary school sport has also been ring-fenced, a unique position in school funding and one which demonstrates the importance we place on PE and sport in schools. 105
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

As the large majority of UK students study in England English the HEFCE data tends to show very similar trends to the HESA data set out above. This paper therefore just summarises some of their recent analysis and commentary around these trends. It is taken from the following: • Higher education in England: Impact of the 2012 reforms (March 2013) • Higher education in England 2014 Analysis of latest shifts and trends (April

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