Top PDF House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 5871, 13 August 2019 : Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 5871, 13 August 2019 : Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 5871, 13 August 2019 : Youth Unemployment Statistics

For context, it is worth noting that the total population aged 16-24 has been declining in recent years; in April to June it was 87,000 less than a year before. The number of young people in employment decreased by 25,000 over the past year, while the number who are economically inactive (not in or looking for work) decreased by 74,000.

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 10 September 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 10 September 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

For context, it is worth noting that the total population aged 16-24 has been declining in recent years; in the year to May-July 2019 it decreased by 86,000. The number of young people in employment decreased by 54,000 over the past year, while the number who are economically inactive (not in or looking for work) decreased by 31,000.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 16 April 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 16 April 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

For context, it is worth noting that the total population aged 16-24 has been declining in recent years; it was 22,000 lower than the previous quarter and 89,000 less than a year before. The number of young people in employment increased by 42,000 over the past year. The number who are economically inactive (not in or looking for work) decreased by 101,000.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number SN05871, 16 August 2017: Youth unemployment statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number SN05871, 16 August 2017: Youth unemployment statistics

Not adjusting for seasonal effects, 157,100 people aged 18-24 were claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance or were claiming Universal Credit and required to seek work in July 2017. This is 2,200 fewer than a year ago. These numbers are, however, highly seasonal and are impacted by the ongoing rollout of Universal Credit. Under Universal Credit, a broader span of claimants are required to look for work than under Jobseeker's Allowance. This has the effect of increasing the number of unemployed claimants compared to the previous system. Additionally, Universal Credit appears to follow a different seasonal pattern to Jobseeker’s Allowance.
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

researchers have made a number of attempts. Section 2 of Library Research Paper 13/1, Welfare Benefits Uprating Bill, 2013 , gives an overview of the debate. One such attempt is a major annual research project funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, which estimates Minimum Income Standards (MIS) for different household types in the UK. This involves in-depth consultation with members of the public, combined with expert knowledge, to identify the level of income required to meet a minimum acceptable standard of living: “having what you need in order to have the opportunities and choices necessary to participate in society.” The first findings were published in 2008 and are updated each year. 39 For most household types, the MIS is well above the relative low income threshold. This
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

The maximum maintenance grant available was £1,000 less than that for existing students. This was compensated for by a matching increase in loan entitlement. Most new entrants were also expected make an income-assessed contribution of up to £1,000 a year to the cost of their tuition. From 1999 new entrants and those who started in 1998 received all maintenance support as loans which were partly income-assessed. A different repayment system operates for loans for new students from 1998. These are income contingent repayments where graduates repay 9% of gross income annual above £10,000. 59 This threshold was raised to £15,000 in April 2005. The last Government planned to receive this level in 2010, but did not alter its level. The Coalition Government announced that the repayment thresholds for students with income contingent loans who started higher education before 2012/13 would be increased in line with inflation until 2016. 60 Further changes in the student finance system were introduced in 2006/07 when new students attending institutions in England and Northern Ireland could be charged variable fees of up to £3,000.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

17% 30% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Keep house warm Keep up to date with bills Money to decorate home Replace broken electrical goods Home contents insurance Replace worn out furniture Money to spend on self each week Make savings of 10 pounds a month or more One week's holiday away from home not with relatives Have a warm winter coat Celebrations on special occasions Eat fresh fruit and/or vegetables every day Go to a playgroup at least once a week Go on school trip at least once a term Have friends round for tea or a snack once a fortnight Leisure equipment, e.g. sports equipment or a bicycle Hobby or leisure activity Attend organised activity once a week Outdoor space / facilities to play safely Bedrooms for every child aged 10+ of different gender One week's holiday away from home with family
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House of Commons Library: briefing paper : Number 06113, 11 February 2019: Apprenticeship Statistics: England

House of Commons Library: briefing paper : Number 06113, 11 February 2019: Apprenticeship Statistics: England

The Apprenticeship Grant for Employers of 16 to 24 year olds (AGE 16- 24) was introduced in February 2012, and provided £1,500 to small businesses hiring young apprentices. In 2013/14 advanced learner loans were introduced, and individuals aged 24 and over were required to take these loans to pay half of the cost of advanced level apprenticeships. This was the first time that apprentices were expected to contribute to the costs of their learning, and led to an 88% fall in the number of people aged 25+ starting an advanced or higher apprenticeship. In February 2014 the Skills Funding
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7096, 31 August 2018: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7096, 31 August 2018: Poverty in the UK: statistics

15% 32% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Keep house warm Keep up to date with bills Money to decorate home Replace broken electrical goods Home contents insurance Replace worn out furniture Money to spend on self each week Make savings of 10 pounds a month or more One week's holiday away from home not with relatives Have a warm winter coat Celebrations on special occasions Eat fresh fruit and/or vegetables every day Go to a playgroup at least once a week Go on school trip at least once a term Leisure equipment, e.g. sports equipment or a bicycle Hobby or leisure activity Have friends round for tea or a snack once a fortnight Outdoor space / facilities to play safely Attend organised activity once a week Bedrooms for every child aged 10+ of different gender One week's holiday away from home with family
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8538, 14 August 2019: The Review of University Admissions

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8538, 14 August 2019: The Review of University Admissions

Research has shown that external factors such as ‘schooling effects’ and family background have a major influence on the performance of students in exams and on the educational aspirat[r]

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

3.1 Staff numbers Academic staff Between 1994/95 and 2002/03 the number of full-time academic staff at UK HEIs increased by 18% and the number of part time staff by almost 120%. The total headcount increased by 28% and there were above average increases in the number of academics working in research only (not teaching) and in the number of professors, and (non senior) researchers. However, full-timers and academics involved in teaching at least part of the time were still in the majority in 2002/03. More detail is given in Table 4 at the end of this note. The headcount number can obscure some trends in the balance between full- and part-time staff, but it was all that was published at the time. The increase in academic staff headcount over this period was slightly higher than the increase in full-time equivalent student numbers, 29 but much of the growth in staff numbers was in part-timers.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07585, 8 August 2019 : The Troubled Families Programme (England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07585, 8 August 2019 : The Troubled Families Programme (England)

Clearly the emphasis on whole-family working has been […] unambiguously positive. The key worker approach has been unambiguously positive. At the moment there is an interesting conversation to be had around whether more of the support should be targeted at the very early stage of young children’s lives, from conception to two years old. It is something that the Leader of the House, Andrea Leadsom, has formed a ministerial group and a taskforce on, which both of us sit on. She is someone who has a passion for that area. It is something that others, including the Science and Technology Committee, have talked about as well. There is good research to show that those first crucial couple of years are vital in a baby or child’s development, for all the various things that might happen down the line.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08414, 1 August 2019 : School uniform costs in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08414, 1 August 2019 : School uniform costs in England

In September 2017, the issue of VAT for school uniform was raised in the House: Sarah Jones: Our children go back to school this week, and parents are still paying a fortune for branded school uniforms. Cutting VAT on uniforms for older children would save some £200 million, but this cannot be done under current EU law. My constituents have asked me to ask Ministers to raise this matter whenever the negotiations turn to VAT.

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

September 2018 Accountability Commission report. 13 The Education Policy Institute (EPI) think tank praised many aspects of the new framework, including its focus on off-rolling and schools’ use of exclusion. EPI also commended “improvements to the framework which are welcome because they have the potential to promote judgements that are sharper with respect to the inclusion of vulnerable learners and fairer to schools with more of these pupils.” However, it criticised Ofsted’s decision to stop recommending that some schools review their use of the Pupil Premium, and for the framework’s approach to speaking and listening skills in the early years and in the teaching of early reading. 14
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 7951, 21 August 2019: T Levels: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 7951, 21 August 2019: T Levels: Reforms to Technical Education

• substantial academic or applied and technical qualifications; • non-qualification activity, such as work experience; and • the study of English and maths where they do not hold a GCSE 9-4 (reformed grading) or A*-C (legacy grading) in these subjects. 2 Under the 16-19 funding formula introduced in 2013-14, a single basic funding rate per full-time student, currently £4,000 for 16 and 17 year olds, is intended to fund a study programme of around 600 guided learning hours, regardless of where and what the student studies. 3 The formula also provides a number of funding uplifts, including for large programmes and disadvantaged learners, and an area costs adjustment. Further information on the funding of 16-19 education is provided in Library Briefing 7019, 16- 19 education funding in England since 2010.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

The MoJ will publish more and better data on ethnicity where possible and we will welcome external analysis where it throws light on problems that need closer examination, especially where it relates to smaller minority groups. This will be implemented in statistics bulletins during 2018/19, or next annual publication after this date. For example, Gypsy, Roma, and Traveller defendants and offenders often have specific needs that are not met by the criminal justice system, because of a lack of data on their treatment and outcomes. We will review the potential further breakdown of data for this ethnic group as new data becomes available with the new criminal justice system data standard capture system 18+1 (18 ethnicity categories plus “other”).
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

The MoJ will publish more and better data on ethnicity where possible and we will welcome external analysis where it throws light on problems that need closer examination, especially where it relates to smaller minority groups. This will be implemented in statistics bulletins during 2018/19, or next annual publication after this date. For example, Gypsy, Roma, and Traveller defendants and offenders often have specific needs that are not met by the criminal justice system, because of a lack of data on their treatment and outcomes. We will review the potential further breakdown of data for this ethnic group as new data becomes available with the new criminal justice system data standard capture system 18+1 (18 ethnicity categories plus “other”).
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08072, 4 August 2017: School Governance

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08072, 4 August 2017: School Governance

Disclaimer This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 917, 2 December 2016: Tuition Fee Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 917, 2 December 2016: Tuition Fee Statistics

Neither of the first two falls changed the overall upward trends, they were dips linked to changes in fees. Applicant numbers recovered more quickly after the introduction of variable fees in 2006. There is no way to assign a set proportion of these changes to tuition fees. Variations in applicants and acceptances across the home countries since 2006 can help focus on the impact of higher fees to some extent. The number of applicants who lived in Scotland (and hence were not liable for variable fees at institutions in Scotland) increased by 2% in 2006, compared to a 4% fall among those living in England. However, after then the increase in applicants has been larger in England and the total increase between 2004 and 2011 was 28% in England compared with 15% in Scotland. 44 These comparisons are far from perfect as they exclude the impact of underlying demographics and differences in the courses covered by UCAS in each country. They provide no evidence that variable fees caused a major ongoing decline or downward shift in overall numbers of applicants or entrants to higher education in England. Similarly there is no evidence that those from ‘lower’ socio-economic groups or (deprived) areas with historically low levels of participation have been adversely affected by tuition fees. The proportion of students from these groups has increased over this period. The note Higher education and social class looks at this subject in detail. A report from the funding council concluded that there have been substantial and sustained increases in participation among young people from disadvantaged 45 areas in England. More of the increase in participation since the mid-
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 18 June 2018: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 18 June 2018: Student Loan Statistics

The Government gradually introduced new arrangements for students starting in autumn 1998 (academic year 1998/99). In the first year new entrants received support through loans and grants. The maximum maintenance grant available was £1,000 less than that for existing students. This was compensated for by a matching increase in loan entitlement. Most new entrants were also expected make an income-assessed contribution of up to £1,000 a year to the cost of their tuition. From 1999 new entrants and those who started in 1998 received all maintenance support as loans which were partly income-assessed. A different repayment system operates for loans for new students from 1998. These are income contingent repayments where graduates repay 9% of gross income annual above £10,000. 6 This threshold was raised to £15,000 in April 2000. The last Government planned to receive this level in 2010, but did not alter its level. The Coalition Government announced that the repayment thresholds for students with income contingent loans who started higher education before 2012/13 will be increased in line with inflation until 2016. 7
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