Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7033, 2 December 2016: Free schools statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7033, 2 December 2016: Free schools statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7033, 2 December 2016: Free schools statistics

needed. This is particularly important at a time of tight public finances and growing demand for new places. The Department for Education has said that 83% of the 213 mainstream free schools approved in waves 5-11 in areas where there was a need for extra school places or there is a projected need for new places in the future. 11 The area is defined as the planning area 12 which the free school located in and those adjacent to it. The underlying data used to inform this assessment compares the expected number of places available in the relevant future year with projected number of pupils. 13 The National Audit Office looked at schools opening up to 2013 and found that almost 90% of the places in primary free schools were in local authority districts forecasting some need for new places, as were 19% of
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 917, 2 December 2016: Tuition Fee Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 917, 2 December 2016: Tuition Fee Statistics

Neither of the first two falls changed the overall upward trends, they were dips linked to changes in fees. Applicant numbers recovered more quickly after the introduction of variable fees in 2006. There is no way to assign a set proportion of these changes to tuition fees. Variations in applicants and acceptances across the home countries since 2006 can help focus on the impact of higher fees to some extent. The number of applicants who lived in Scotland (and hence were not liable for variable fees at institutions in Scotland) increased by 2% in 2006, compared to a 4% fall among those living in England. However, after then the increase in applicants has been larger in England and the total increase between 2004 and 2011 was 28% in England compared with 15% in Scotland. 44 These comparisons are far from perfect as they exclude the impact of underlying demographics and differences in the courses covered by UCAS in each country. They provide no evidence that variable fees caused a major ongoing decline or downward shift in overall numbers of applicants or entrants to higher education in England. Similarly there is no evidence that those from ‘lower’ socio-economic groups or (deprived) areas with historically low levels of participation have been adversely affected by tuition fees. The proportion of students from these groups has increased over this period. The note Higher education and social class looks at this subject in detail. A report from the funding council concluded that there have been substantial and sustained increases in participation among young people from disadvantaged 45 areas in England. More of the increase in participation since the mid-
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 2 December 2016: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 2 December 2016: Student Loan Statistics

[…] But the expansion of higher education relies on funding being put onto a sustainable footing. The government must therefore ask graduates to meet more of the cost of their degrees once they are earning. From the 2016-17 academic year, maintenance grants will be replaced with maintenance loans for new students from England, paid back only when their earnings exceed £21,000 a year, saving £2.5 billion by 2020-21. To ensure that the long term costs of the student loan book remain affordable and transparent, the government will consult on freezing the loan repayment threshold for five years and review the discount rate applied to student loans and other transactions to bring it into line with the government’s long-term cost of borrowing.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 917, 2 December 2016: Tuition Fee Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 917, 2 December 2016: Tuition Fee Statistics

Neither of the first two falls changed the overall upward trends, they were dips linked to changes in fees. Applicant numbers recovered more quickly after the introduction of variable fees in 2006. There is no way to assign a set proportion of these changes to tuition fees. Variations in applicants and acceptances across the home countries since 2006 can help focus on the impact of higher fees to some extent. The number of applicants who lived in Scotland (and hence were not liable for variable fees at institutions in Scotland) increased by 2% in 2006, compared to a 4% fall among those living in England. However, after then the increase in applicants has been larger in England and the total increase between 2004 and 2011 was 28% in England compared with 15% in Scotland. 44 These comparisons are far from perfect as they exclude the impact of underlying demographics and differences in the courses covered by UCAS in each country. They provide no evidence that variable fees caused a major ongoing decline or downward shift in overall numbers of applicants or entrants to higher education in England. Similarly there is no evidence that those from ‘lower’ socio-economic groups or (deprived) areas with historically low levels of participation have been adversely affected by tuition fees. The proportion of students from these groups has increased over this period. The note Higher education and social class looks at this subject in detail. A report from the funding council concluded that there have been substantial and sustained increases in participation among young people from disadvantaged 45 areas in England. More of the increase in participation since the mid-
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House of Commons library: Briefing paper: Number 07819, 2 December 2016: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons library: Briefing paper: Number 07819, 2 December 2016: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

The Scottish Government guide to Choosing a School states that: If you have a child who is due to start primary school or who will be transferring to secondary school soon, your council will probably suggest that you should use the local school designated by them. Of course most people are happy to do so, but the council must also tell you of your right to choose a different school. It can give you a contact address where you can get information to help in making up your mind. If you write to a council and request a place in a particular school, this is known as a placing request. The council has a duty to grant such a request wherever possible. However, the size of the school, the current roll and number of children who already live in the catchment area and other factors will affect the council's ability to grant a placing request. 7
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number CBP07802: 2 December 2016: Social Work Regulation (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number CBP07802: 2 December 2016: Social Work Regulation (England)

Whilst there is evidence of much good social work practice in England, a number of serious case reviews and inspections have highlighted inconsistency in practice across the country, and in some cases have pointed to failings in practice including: “variability in leadership, supervision and line management; accountability and governance structures that work better in some areas than others; and, a weakness in the overall system’s ability to learn effectively from good practice and from mistakes”. 28 Two independent reviews of social work education in 2014 highlighted the need for improvement in social worker initial education and continuous development. 29 In October 2016 the National Audit Office published a report criticising the Government’s progress in improving children’s services:
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049: 5 December 2016: Postgraduate loans in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049: 5 December 2016: Postgraduate loans in England

1.154 Autumn Statement 2014 therefore introduces a new offer of income contingent loans for those under 30 years old wishing to undertake a postgraduate taught masters in any subject. These loans, of up to £10,000, are planned to be available from 2016- 17 and will be repaid concurrently with undergraduate loans. The loans are designed so that, on average, individuals will repay in full, in recognition of the high private return to individuals, but they will beat commercial rates. The government will consult on the detail and will confirm the delivery plan. This is expected to benefit around 40,000 students, and enable around 10,000 more individuals to take advantage of the opportunity to undertake postgraduate study each year.
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7845, 22 December 2016 : Work and Health Programme

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7845, 22 December 2016 : Work and Health Programme

… For me, coming in fresh to this Department, rather than rushing towards a White Paper, I think there is a need to take a step back and I think that’s consistent with what I told the House on that first Monday after I was appointed, about wanting to restart the conversation with disability organisations and disabled people themselves about how best we—as a Government—can work with them to close the disability employment gap, and support people who have sicknesses and other conditions into employment. So I won’t be rushing towards a White Paper with firm legislative proposals; I want to take a step back and have a much more discursive Green Paper that starts to reframe the issue and points the way towards more meaningful, long-term reform. 9
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

17% 30% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Keep house warm Keep up to date with bills Money to decorate home Replace broken electrical goods Home contents insurance Replace worn out furniture Money to spend on self each week Make savings of 10 pounds a month or more One week's holiday away from home not with relatives Have a warm winter coat Celebrations on special occasions Eat fresh fruit and/or vegetables every day Go to a playgroup at least once a week Go on school trip at least once a term Have friends round for tea or a snack once a fortnight Leisure equipment, e.g. sports equipment or a bicycle Hobby or leisure activity Attend organised activity once a week Outdoor space / facilities to play safely Bedrooms for every child aged 10+ of different gender One week's holiday away from home with family
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

38 0 10 20 30 40 50 At least one filling meal a day Have a warm waterproof coat Heating, electrics, plumbing and drains working Home kept in a good state of repair Able to pay regular bills Home kept adequately warm See friends or family at least once a month Have a telephone to use, whenever needed Have a damp-free home Able to replace cooker if it broke down Have hair done or cut regularly Able to pay an unexpected expense of £200 Have access to a car or taxi, whenever needed Go out socially at least once a month Take a holiday away from home

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 06972: 20 December 2019: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 06972: 20 December 2019: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

Maria Miller: My hon. Friend is right to raise this issue, which has been a concern for many of our constituents. I can confirm that nothing will change what children are taught. Teachers will be able to describe their belief that marriage is between a man and a woman, while acknowledging that same-sex marriage will be available. It is important to reassure people. There is a great deal of what perhaps one could call scaremongering. It is important that teachers and faith schools are aware that they will continue to enjoy the same situation as they do now. 18

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08444, 10 December 2018 : Off-rolling in English schools

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08444, 10 December 2018 : Off-rolling in English schools

Recent years, however, have seen concerns being raised that children are leaving school rolls in rising numbers, in particular as they approach GCSE level, because of pressures within the school system. It has been suggested that increased ‘off-rolling’ is taking place because of the impact of pupils who are likely to perform relatively poorly in their examinations on school performance measures, and because schools may be struggling to support children who need high levels of support, for example pupils with special educational needs. Off-rolling of this kind might involve children being excluded for reasons that are not legitimate, or parents being encouraged to home educate a child where they would not otherwise have chosen to do so.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

Quality of language teaching As noted in section 2.1, the 2011 Ofsted report identified good teaching in two thirds of the lessons observed in primary school, with primary teachers’ subject knowledge and their teaching methods described as predominantly good. Some weaknesses lay in the assessment, and the monitoring and evaluation of provision, often because school leaders did not feel competent enough to judge language provision. The 2011 report stated that in many of the secondary schools visited, opportunities for students to listen to and communicate in the target language were often limited by many teachers’ unpreparedness to use it, and that teaching in Key Stage 4 was focused on achieving good examination results, but this did not always prepare students sufficiently for study at a more advanced level, post-16. However, teaching and learning were good in most of the post-16 providers visited, and the relatively small numbers of students on modern language courses achieved well. 11
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07059: 18 June 2019: FAQs: Academies and free schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07059: 18 June 2019: FAQs: Academies and free schools

As I said, we have been working very collaboratively with local authorities to plan much more accurately with them precisely where they want free schools. Local authorities obviously often produce free school sites on a peppercorn for no money. It is also clear to us that some local authorities have perhaps not been spending their basic need money, as they should have been, but relying on the central programme. I believe that this can be done efficiently. The local authorities that we work with certainly seem keen to provide many more of these schools. We go through a process whereby they decide where they want the schools to be and, effectively, an open process is then gone through whereby school providers can approach them and be approved, initially by the local authority and then by the department.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

The governing body should be able to demonstrate how best value has been achieved and keep the cost of supplying the uniform under review. When considering how the school uniform should be sourced, governing bodies should give highest priority to the consideration of cost and value for money for parents. The school uniform should be easily available for parents to purchase and schools should seek to select items that can be purchased cheaply, for example in a supermarket or other good value shop. Schools should keep compulsory branded items to a minimum and avoid specifying expensive items of uniform e.g. expensive outdoor coats. 31
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7847, 29 December 2016 : UK Funding from the EU

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7847, 29 December 2016 : UK Funding from the EU

EIB, The EIB in the United Kingdom (accessed on 14 November 2016) The EIB has played a role in various large scale infrastructure projects in the UK, including the Channel tunnel, the second Severn crossing, the Jubilee Line extension to the London Underground network, the Heathrow Express and London to Dover fast rail links. Brian Unwin, a British former President of the EIB, has suggested that: “There is no alternative multilateral institution with the EIB’s lending capacity and expertise in infrastructure investment, and proposals to establish a UK equivalent have come to nothing.”
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7834, 13 December 2016 : The impact of leaving the EU on higher education

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7834, 13 December 2016 : The impact of leaving the EU on higher education

of the total student loan bill. 4 UK students benefit from the UK’s EU membership by way of access to Erasmus+ a mobility scheme that provides students with opportunities to study in the EU. UK HEIs also benefit significantly from EU science and research funding and the free movement of academics across the EU. The UK is predicted to receive about £2 billion from the Horizon 2020 programme in the first two years of operation and it is estimated that the 24 Russell Group universities receive about £400 million a year in EU research funds - some 11% of their research income. 5 In addition British universities employ more than 30,000 scientists from EU countries 6 and in some UK universities, up to 50 per cent of postdoctoral positions are held by EU citizens. 7
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

researchers have made a number of attempts. Section 2 of Library Research Paper 13/1, Welfare Benefits Uprating Bill, 2013 , gives an overview of the debate. One such attempt is a major annual research project funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, which estimates Minimum Income Standards (MIS) for different household types in the UK. This involves in-depth consultation with members of the public, combined with expert knowledge, to identify the level of income required to meet a minimum acceptable standard of living: “having what you need in order to have the opportunities and choices necessary to participate in society.” The first findings were published in 2008 and are updated each year. 39 For most household types, the MIS is well above the relative low income threshold. This
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 07846, 22 December 2016 : Changes to school accountability and 'league tables' in England in 2016

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 07846, 22 December 2016 : Changes to school accountability and 'league tables' in England in 2016

Progress 8: If a school’s score is positive it means their pupils made more progress than pupils with a similar starting point nationally and vice versa . Results are centered around zero (the national average) and a score of, say, +0.5 means that on average pupils at that school achieved half grade higher per subject than pupils nationally with the same levels of prior attainment. Results are given as confidence intervals to help account for the normal variability in annual results not directly linked to a school’s performance. Only where the whole interval is above or below zero can we be reasonably certain that a schools results are better or worse than average.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

The maximum maintenance grant available was £1,000 less than that for existing students. This was compensated for by a matching increase in loan entitlement. Most new entrants were also expected make an income-assessed contribution of up to £1,000 a year to the cost of their tuition. From 1999 new entrants and those who started in 1998 received all maintenance support as loans which were partly income-assessed. A different repayment system operates for loans for new students from 1998. These are income contingent repayments where graduates repay 9% of gross income annual above £10,000. 59 This threshold was raised to £15,000 in April 2005. The last Government planned to receive this level in 2010, but did not alter its level. The Coalition Government announced that the repayment thresholds for students with income contingent loans who started higher education before 2012/13 would be increased in line with inflation until 2016. 60 Further changes in the student finance system were introduced in 2006/07 when new students attending institutions in England and Northern Ireland could be charged variable fees of up to £3,000.
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