Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The initial teaching and learning funding allocations for adult further education (FE) and skills in England fell from a 2010-11 baseline of £3.18 billion to £2.94 billion in 2015-16, a reduction of 8% in cash terms or 14% in real terms. The allocation for 2015-16 fell further as a result of the 2015 Summer Budget, which reduced the non-apprenticeship part of the Adult Skills Budget (ASB) by an additional 3.9%. While funding for community learning and offender learning stayed fairly constant over the period, ASB funding declined by 29% in cash terms between 2010-11 and 2015-16 – this in part connected to the replacement of grant funding with loan funding for some learners from 2013-14 onwards. The minimum annual funding allocated to adult apprenticeships increased by 113% between 2010-11 and 2015-16, meaning that non-apprenticeship funding comprised a smaller proportion of the reduced ASB.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The budget for Advanced Learner Loans is planned to increase from a 2015-16 baseline of £0.20 billion to £0.48 billion in 2019-20. The 2015-16 baseline is based on an estimate of the likely value of loans paid put in the year, which is £298 million less than the initial budget allocation set out in the skills funding letter. Whether the forecast increase in loan budgets result in an increase in loan funding provided to students depends in part, of course, on the future demand for loans (see box three above).

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since
2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

allocated at the spending review. In addition, while the categories used in the SFA annual accounts are similar to those used in the skills funding statements and letters, in some places they provide slightly more detail – for example, a more detailed breakdown of ASB expenditure between 2010-11 and 2014-15. The accounts also allow a consistent time series for all non-teaching expenditure excluding capital to be created back to 2010-11.

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

allocated at the spending review. In addition, while the categories used in the SFA annual accounts are similar to those used in the skills funding statements and letters, in some places they provide slightly more detail – for example, a more detailed breakdown of ASB expenditure between 2010-11 and 2014-15. The accounts also allow a consistent time series for all non-teaching expenditure excluding capital to be created back to 2010-11.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

transition funding so that schools do not suffer abrupt changes to their funding straight away. We fund all 16-to-19 providers for study programmes of 600 hours per year for full-time students. That is sufficient for a study programme of three A-levels plus one AS-level, and up to 150 hours of enrichment activities, over a two- year study programme. There should be no need to cut those extra-curricular activities, which are such an important part of a rounded school education. In addition, as has been mentioned, we have, in 2013-14, increased the rate for larger programmes of study. For students who are studying four A-levels, the school will receive an extra £400 per pupil, and for those who are studying five A-levels, the school will receive an extra £800. 86
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8386, 17 April 2019: Cost of university courses in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8386, 17 April 2019: Cost of university courses in England

Experience Survey, stated that from 2012 to 2017 there was a constant decline in the number of students stating that they felt their higher education represented good value for money. In 2018 however the number of students who said that their course was good value for money increased by 3% to 38%. – but there was still a significant proportion of students (32%) who said that their course was poor, or very poor value for money. The survey further showed that students perceptions of value for money varied across institutions and across subjects – with students at Russell Group universities and on medical degrees showing the highest levels of satisfaction.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

Public funding for postgraduates has traditionally been limited compared to that available to undergraduates. Prior to 2016-17, Government funding was generally limited to specific courses, such as some postgraduate teacher training and some medical and healthcare courses, or provided indirectly through the Research Councils and the Postgraduate Support Scheme. Aside from self-financing, other sources of funding for postgraduate students were from individual higher education institutions, Professional and Career Development Loans, and educational trusts and charities.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

During the later period of the 1997-2010 Labour Government, concerns were raised about the operation of the SEN system. In July 2006, the then Commons Education and Skills Select Committee reported on special educational needs, and highlighted strong concerns about parents’ confidence in the SEN system. The report raised issues about the statementing process and the issuing of statements; transfer of statements; placement decisions; the role of local authorities; school admissions and fair access for children with SEN; and parental choice in relation to academies. 5
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

Nutritional standards for school dinners were first established in the 1940s in England but were abolished in 1980. Subsequently, the School Standards and Framework Act 1998 gave the Secretary of State the power to make regulations prescribing nutritional standards and other nutritional requirements for school meals. It also placed a duty on LEAs and the governing bodies of schools maintained by LEAs, when they provide lunches, to provide them for registered pupils in line with the standards. In April 2001, statutory nutritional standards for school lunches were reintroduced by the Education (Nutritional Standards for School Lunches) Regulations 2000 (since superseded).
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

In July 2015, the National Audit Office (NAO) published a report on the oversight of financial sustainability in the FE sector. The report found that the “financial health of the…sector has been declining since 2010-11” and that “the number of colleges under strain is set to rise rapidly”. It further stated that “reductions and changing priorities in public funding”, along with a declining 16-18 population and increased competition from schools and colleges, had “combined to create a challenging educational and financial climate for many colleges”. The report recommended that decisions about whether to merge or close a college need to be “supported by good information on educational and skills needs in the area, and the capacity available to meet them”. 8
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

Academies and free schools are state-funded, non-fee paying schools that are independent of local authorities. They are funded directly by the Department for Education (through the Education Funding Agency) and sign a funding agreement with the Secretary of State to receive that money. Many have sponsors, but this is no longer a requirement. At January 2016, 65.5 per cent of secondary pupils and 19.5 per cent of primary pupils in England were attending academies. 1

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

We will establish new institutes of technology, backed by leading employers and linked to leading universities, in every major city in England. They will provide courses at degree level and above, specialising in technical disciplines, such as STEM, whilst also providing higher-level apprenticeships and bespoke courses for employers. They will enjoy the freedoms that make our universities great, including eligibility for public funding for productivity and skills research, and access to loans and grants for their students. They will be able to gain royal charter status and regius professorships in technical education. Above all, they will become anchor institutions for local, regional and national industry, providing sought-after skills to support the economy,
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

The 2012 changes in university funding directly affect teaching rather than research. Plans were set out for each year to 2014-15 soon after the 2010 CSR was published. The earlier table shows that recurrent funding for research broadly maintained its cash value up to 2014-15. The 2013 Spending Round kept the total resource (recurrent) science budget for 2015-16, which includes funding for Research Councils and other areas, at the same cash level as earlier years. Total capital funding for science was increased, partially reversing earlier cuts. 15

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

The report’s recommendation that PSHE be made part of the curriculum was part of the Children, Schools and Families Bill, Session 2009-10. The Library research paper 09/95 on the Bill sets out the proposals of the then Labour Government. The PSHE provisions and sex education generally were discussed during the Public Bill Committee – pp 13 and 14 of the Library research paper 10/12 give an account of the debates. However, many of the key provisions of the Bill were removed during the consideration of Lords Amendments on 8 April 2010 immediately before the dissolution of Parliament for the general election. The provisions removed included the introduction of compulsory PSHE, and the provision that all children receive at least one year of sex and relationship education. Incidentally, the provisions in the Bill that did survive are now contained in the Children, Schools and Families Act 2010 .
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

The term 16-19 education is used in this briefing to refer to education funded by the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) and its predecessor bodies through the 16-19 funding system. This refers to a broad range of educational provision, including (but not limited to), students aged 16-19 in maintained school and academy sixth forms, sixth form colleges, general further education (FE) colleges, and special schools. It also includes students aged 19 to 25 with Education, Health and Care Plans. It does not include students on apprenticeships or at higher education institutions.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

We have protected the base rate of funding at £4,000 per student for all types of providers until 2020 to ensure that happens. Extra funding is provided where needed, for example, for students on large academic programmes and for providers to attract, support and retain disadvantaged 16 to 19-year olds. In addition, my Rt hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced in the Spring Budget a significant investment in technical education for 16-19 year olds, rising to an additional £500 million a year. The first £74 million of this investment will be allocated to help institutions build their capacity for the improved work placements that will form part of new T level programmes, from April 2018 to July 2019.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

Twelve thousand students, those in care, care leavers and those receiving income support, including the severely disabled, should in future all receive an annual bursary of £1,200 if they stay on in education—more every year than they ever received under EMA. I also propose that those most in need who are currently in receipt of EMA be protected. All young people who began courses in 2009-10 and who were told that they should receive EMA will still receive their weekly payments. Young people who started courses in the 2010-11 academic year and received the maximum weekly payment of £30 should now receive weekly payments of at least £20 until the end of the next academic year.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

Also, through Sport England, we are investing £1 billion over the next five years in the youth sport strategy to encourage everyone, but particularly young people to take up sport and develop a sporting habit for life. This strategy will provide lottery and exchequer funding to: enable the sports’ governing bodies to create more opportunities for everyone to participate in sport at least once a week; help local authorities improve sport provision; support local organisations, well-run clubs, voluntary groups and other partners such as the Dame Kelly Holmes Legacy Trust and Street Games; enhance sport provision at further education colleges and Universities; upgrade community sports facilities and invest in new facilities; enable schools to open up their sporting facilities for use by local communities; rolled out at least 6,000 partnerships between schools and local sports clubs by 2017. School Games
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

• Both employers and training providers will receive £1,000 from the government for every apprentice they take on who is either aged between 16 and 18, or aged between 19 and 24 and has previously been in care or who have a Local Authority Education, Health and Care plan. This will be paid in two instalments of £500, the first of which will be paid after the first three months and the second will be paid after 12 months. This payment reflects the extra support that these apprentices generally need, and the costs associated with this support. 30

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06072, 20 March 2017: School funding in England. Current system and proposals for 'fairer school funding'

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06072, 20 March 2017: School funding in England. Current system and proposals for 'fairer school funding'

But it is not possible to translate these pressures into individual school level estimates. That is partly because many schools will see significant increases in pupil numbers over the coming period, feeding through into increased total budgets. It is also because the circumstances of every school are unique – with different pay and non-pay costs and very different staffing structures. Every school will need to understand and plan for their own situation. Illustrating core funding levels in cash terms per pupil – based on real 2016-17 data – is the clearest and most helpful way of enabling them to do so. 35
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