Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

2015-16, with the addition of funding for 24+ Advanced Learner Loans and the Employer Ownership pilots from 2013-14 onwards. 14 Box 3: Advanced Learner Loans From 2013-14, grant funding for leaners aged 24 and over studying at levels 3 and 4 (e.g. A-levels) was removed and replaced with Advanced Learner Loans. Initially, loans also replaced grants for apprentices aged 24 and over studying at level 3 and above. However, loans for apprentices were dropped from February 2014 onwards, in part due to low take-up, and higher level apprenticeships were instead made eligible for grant funding from the ASB. 15 The Spending Review 2015 announced plans to expand eligibility for Advanced Learner Loans to 19-23 year olds studying at levels 3 and 4, and to learners aged 19 and over studying at levels 5 and 6. 16 The availability of loans does not replace the entitlement to full grant funding for learners aged 19-23 undertaking their first level 3 qualification. 17
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

After the UK leaves the EU it will no longer receive European structural funding (of which the social fund is a part). In order to replace this funding, the Government has pledged to set up a Shared Prosperity Fund to “reduce inequalities between communities and help deliver sustainable, inclusive growth.” 20 In the short term, the draft Withdrawal Agreement would mean that the UK would continue to participate in the ESF until programmes end in 2023. The Government has additionally guaranteed to fund all European Social Fund projects that would have been funded by the EU under the 2014-2020 programme period in the event of no deal being reached. 21
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

2015-16, with the addition of funding for 24+ Advanced Learner Loans and the Employer Ownership pilots from 2013-14 onwards. 14 Box 3: Advanced Learner Loans From 2013-14, grant funding for leaners aged 24 and over studying at levels 3 and 4 (e.g. A-levels) was removed and replaced with Advanced Learner Loans. Initially, loans also replaced grants for apprentices aged 24 and over studying at level 3 and above. However, loans for apprentices were dropped from February 2014 onwards, in part due to low take-up, and higher level apprenticeships were instead made eligible for grant funding from the ASB. 15 Following an announcement at the Spending Review 2015 Advanced Learner Loans were additionally made available for 19-23 year olds studying at levels 3 and 4, and to learners aged 19 and over studying at levels 5 and 6. 16 The availability of loans does not replace the entitlement to full grant funding for learners aged 19-23 undertaking their first level 3 qualification. 17
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since
2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

5.5 FE maintenance loans The March 2017 Budget additionally announced that from 2019-20 maintenance loans like those available for higher education students would be provided to students on technical education courses at levels 4 to 6 in National Colleges and Institutes of Technology. It added that these loans will “support adults to retrain at these institutions.” 43 However, in its response to a consultation on FE maintenance loans in September 2016, the DfE stated that it needed to “consider the value for money case and fiscal position before taking any decision on the case for FE maintenance loans.” 44
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

work based learning. 3 This number was around 56% of those in receipt of EMA in 2010. Funding is allocated to individual schools and colleges to distribute to students under their own criteria. For most institutions this funding is calculated by applying their EMA eligible student rate from 2009/10 to their latest student numbers and, in 2016/17, multiplying by £298 to their total allocation. 4 In 2014/15 direct funding for free meals in further education was introduced to give parity with those attending school sixth forms. In 2016/17 £15 million was removed from discretionary bursary funding to balance out this direct funding which was previously supported on a discretionary basis through the 16-19 bursary fund. 5 Will a particular student be eligible for a discretionary bursary?
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

least April 2021. An equality analysis was produced alongside the consultation response. 13 This looked at the impact on different types of ‘protected characteristics’ such as age, sex, disability and ethnicity. The Spending Review and Autumn Statement 2015 made some headline announcements about funding paid through the funding council, the extension of maintenance loans to part-time students and new loans for Master’s degrees. It also announced that the discount rate applied to loans would be reduced to 0.7% and set the spending totals for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills which will eventually feedthrough to annual funding allocations for higher education.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

After emphasising the importance of the reforms to technical education, including the additional funding to implement them, the Minster then addressed the funding of the sector in general. She stated: The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

After emphasising the importance of the reforms to technical education, including the additional funding to implement them, the Minster then addressed the funding of the sector in general. She stated: The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7019, 19 February 2020: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7019, 19 February 2020: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

funding “only repairs around a quarter of the cuts that 16-19 providers have experienced since 2010-11.” It also noted that, unlike for schools, the settlement for 16-19 is only for one year, which, it said, is likely to mean that the sector continues “to suffer from financial uncertainty.” 52 David Hughes, Chief Executive of the Association of Colleges, welcomed what he termed “the first meaningful investment in further education for 16 to 19 year olds for more than 10 years.” He added that it was “not enough to reverse the decades of cuts, nor to properly stabilise the sector for the future, but it is a good start.” 53 The AoC also published a summary of the key points regarding the funding. 54
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7905, 22 January 2017: Adult ESOL in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7905, 22 January 2017: Adult ESOL in England

The argument for an ESOL strategy The report highlighted the funding reductions to the ESOL sector since 2007 and argued that waiting lists were “at an all-time high” and that “people who want to learn English find that both entitlement to learning and the number of places have dramatically reduced” 57 It also contended that the Government’s emphasis on integration had “not translated into a coherent strategy for ESOL provision in England” and that ESOL policy suffered from a lack of co-ordination, with the Department for Education in the lead, but the Department for Work and Pensions, the Home Office and the Department for Communities and Local Government also having roles. 58
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

achieved solely by increasing the PAN in line with the School Admissions Code. 14 In the case of community, foundation and voluntary schools, local authorities can also propose that a school’s premises be enlarged by following a streamlined statutory process set out in regulations. 15 Academies wishing to enlarge their premises need to seek approval from the Secretary of State, through the Education Funding Agency (EFA). They are not required to submit a formal business case to the EFA unless the expansion is very large scale or increases pupil numbers to 2,000 or more. Further information is contained in advice published by the Department for Education in March 2016, Making significant changes to an open academy. 16
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Adult further education funding in England since 2010

Adult further education funding in England since 2010

apprenticeship funding will, in part, be provided via the apprenticeship levy, a charge set at 0.5% of any UK employer’s pay bill in excess of £3 million. By 2019-20, the Government estimates that the levy will generate over £3 billion of revenue per year, with £2.5 billion to be used for apprenticeships in England. More information on how revenue raised from the levy will be spent is available on the House of Commons Library blog at: Reforms in apprenticeship funding: where do we stand now?

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7905, 25 April 2018: Adult ESOL in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7905, 25 April 2018: Adult ESOL in England

The Controlling Migration Fund includes a local services fund worth £100 million (£25 million in each of the four years from 2016-17 to 2019-20), which councils in England can bid for funding from. The prospectus explaining how local authorities can access the fund makes clear that proposals for funding should demonstrate how they will benefit the resident community in the first instance. It also notes, however, that “legitimate migrants may be the focus of some projects, for example English language support.” 35 In response to a parliamentary question, the Minister, Robert Goodwill, additionally stated that local authorities had been encouraged to consider whether the fund could be used to “help with any short-term pressures as a result of recent arrivals of unaccompanied asylum seeking children.” 36
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

The Library’s Constituency work: Schools in England briefing and gov.uk provide detail on the distinctions between these types of school. In most aspects local authority maintained schools are governed in the same way. However, these finer distinctions may impact on particular areas, such as who can sit on a school’s board of governors, who owns the buildings or is responsible for funding capital work, or who is the admissions authority.

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House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

As regards children with statements of SEN which name schools as the appropriate placement for a child but parents decide to educate such a child at home, it remains the local authority’s duty to ensure that the child’s needs are met through the provision made by the parents. The local authority can support parents financially in these circumstances under section 319 or section 19 of the Education Act 1996 (this would fall under either paragraph 18 or paragraph 20 of Schedule 2 to the School and Early Years Finance (England) Regulations 2012). In deciding how much support is needed, the local authority should be aware that, unlike schools, parents do not receive base funding from the public purse in support of SEN, and should not therefore be expected to pay £10,000 before they receive any support.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

Education Act 1996 they do have a duty to make arrangements to identify children in their area who are not receiving a suitable education. 21 The DfE’s guidance for local authorities explains that, while the law does not assume that a child is not being suitably educated if they are not attending school full-time, it does require local authorities to enquire what education is being provided. 22 There are no detailed requirements as to how a system of oversight should work, and it is for each local authority to decide its approach. However, the guidance emphasises that a proportional approach needs to be taken and local authorities should not exert more oversight than is actually needed when parents are providing a suitable education. It recommends that an authority should ordinarily make contact with home educating parents on at least an annual basis so that it can reasonably inform itself of the suitability of the education provided. 23
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

We will establish new institutes of technology, backed by leading employers and linked to leading universities, in every major city in England. They will provide courses at degree level and above, specialising in technical disciplines, such as STEM, whilst also providing higher-level apprenticeships and bespoke courses for employers. They will enjoy the freedoms that make our universities great, including eligibility for public funding for productivity and skills research, and access to loans and grants for their students. They will be able to gain royal charter status and regius professorships in technical education. Above all, they will become anchor institutions for local, regional and national industry, providing sought-after skills to support the economy,
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

There are some exceptions to this rule for full-time students taking courses in medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, architecture, social work and undergraduate Initial Teacher Training (ITT). For further information see page 41 of Student Finance England’s eligibility guidance. 22 Students with an honours degree may also currently be able to access tuition fee loans for a part-time degree in engineering, technology or computer science. 23 In addition, in July 2016 it was confirmed that from 2017-18 the ELQ rules would be relaxed further to allow students starting part-time second degrees in the following STEM subjects to be eligible for tuition fee loans: subjects allied to medicine; biological sciences;
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7946, 11 April 2017: Millennials

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7946, 11 April 2017: Millennials

generations. Our ongoing inquiry into defined benefit pension schemes will consider intergenerational fairness in that context. 65 The prolonged period of low interest rates since 2008 does not only affect defined benefit schemes (requiring firms to divert more money into funding these schemes since the return on their investments is lower) but also increases the cost to younger workers of providing for their own retirement. Since they are receiving a lower rate of return on their pension savings, workers must save more in order to receive the same level of income that would have been expected under interest rates pre-recession. The OECD outlines the effects on defined contribution schemes:
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

Pre-2015 reforms The Government made estimates of the percentage RAB rate on new loans from 2012 when it published proposals for changes to funding. These are discussed in some detail in Changes to higher education funding and student support in England from 2012/13. The estimated RAB rate on new loans was put at ‘around 30%’, but subsequently increased to ‘around 35%’ 25 then to 35%-40% 26 , revised upwards again to ‘around 40%’ 27 and later to ‘around 45%’. 28 These increases were largely due to changes in economic forecasts, particularly on earnings. 29 These less optimistic forecast reduce the expected cash value of repayments and or delay when they will be made. Other factors behind the increase in the RAB rate include the higher than expected level of average tuition fee loans, a change to the timing of repayment
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