Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

It is this Government’s policy that all good and outstanding schools should be able to expand to offer excellent places to local students. The Weald of Kent Grammar School is one of the top performing schools in the country, with 99% of its students achieving five A*-C grades in GCSE exams in 2014, and 98% of sixth form students achieving at least 3 A-Levels at grades A*-E. The Weald of Kent Grammar School submitted a proposal for expansion in 2013. At that stage the then Secretary of State could not approve the proposal as an expansion because the proposal at that time was for a mixed sex annexe when the existing school was single sex. The school submitted a revised proposal in September 2015 under which girls will be educated on both sites alongside a mixed sex sixth form. I am satisfied that this proposal represents a genuine expansion of the existing school, and that there will be integration between the two sites in terms of leadership, management, governance, admissions and curriculum. I am also satisfied that the excellent quality of learning currently delivered will be replicated across the newly expanded school. I welcome the fact that the newly expanded school will better meet the needs of parents in the local area, with 41% of existing pupils at the Weald of Kent Grammar School already travelling from the Sevenoaks area.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

It is this Government’s policy that all good and outstanding schools should be able to expand to offer excellent places to local students. The Weald of Kent Grammar School is one of the top performing schools in the country, with 99% of its students achieving five A*-C grades in GCSE exams in 2014, and 98% of sixth form students achieving at least 3 A-Levels at grades A*-E. The Weald of Kent Grammar School submitted a proposal for expansion in 2013. At that stage the then Secretary of State could not approve the proposal as an expansion because the proposal at that time was for a mixed sex annexe when the existing school was single sex. The school submitted a revised proposal in September 2015 under which girls will be educated on both sites alongside a mixed sex sixth form. I am satisfied that this proposal represents a genuine expansion of the existing school, and that there will be integration between the two sites in terms of leadership, management, governance, admissions and curriculum. I am also satisfied that the excellent quality of learning currently delivered will be replicated across the newly expanded school. I welcome the fact that the newly expanded school will better meet the needs of parents in the local area, with 41% of existing pupils at the Weald of Kent Grammar School already travelling from the Sevenoaks area.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

leadership, governance, administration arrangements and admissions policies across the school. The school intends to bring all year sevens together for at least half a day a week, and that will extend to all five-year groups as the extended site fills up. There will be a range of cross-site curricular activities, including in personal, social, health and economic education, languages and music, reflecting the integrated split-site school. In addition, the school will continue to operate a house system that will apply to students regardless of their site location, and this will further secure regular, cross-site learning. New staff contracts will make it clear that staff are expected to work on both sites.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

Grammar schools select all or most of their pupils based on examination of their academic ability, usually at age 11. No new grammar schools are currently allowed, although existing ones may expand. They may have academy status or be maintained by a local authority.

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Grammar schools in England: Briefing Paper: 
Number 7070, 3 August 2016

Grammar schools in England: Briefing Paper: Number 7070, 3 August 2016

leadership, governance, administration arrangements and admissions policies across the school. The school intends to bring all year sevens together for at least half a day a week, and that will extend to all five-year groups as the extended site fills up. There will be a range of cross-site curricular activities, including in personal, social, health and economic education, languages and music, reflecting the integrated split-site school. In addition, the school will continue to operate a house system that will apply to students regardless of their site location, and this will further secure regular, cross-site learning. New staff contracts will make it clear that staff are expected to work on both sites.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

We will establish new institutes of technology, backed by leading employers and linked to leading universities, in every major city in England. They will provide courses at degree level and above, specialising in technical disciplines, such as STEM, whilst also providing higher-level apprenticeships and bespoke courses for employers. They will enjoy the freedoms that make our universities great, including eligibility for public funding for productivity and skills research, and access to loans and grants for their students. They will be able to gain royal charter status and regius professorships in technical education. Above all, they will become anchor institutions for local, regional and national industry, providing sought-after skills to support the economy,
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

The 2015 Sport Strategy, Sporting Future, stated that a working group would be established in early 2016 to advise on how to ensure that no child leaves school unable to meet a minimum capability in swimming. The report of the Curriculum Swimming and Water Safety Review Group was published in July 2017. It stated that almost a third (31 per cent) of Year 6 pupils finish primary schools without being able to swim and without basic water safety skills. The report made 16 recommendations for Government, the education sector and the leisure industry aimed at ensuring that “all children leave primary school with an appropriate level of swimming and water safety ability.” 4 In the second annual
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

In January 2012, the then Culture Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, announced the publication of a five-year youth and community sport strategy aimed at increasing the number of young people developing sport as a habit for life. Among other things, the strategy aimed to improve the link between schools and local sports clubs, with the objective that by 2017 “every secondary school and many primary schools will have links with at least one local club.” The strategy additionally committed funding “to allow schools to open up their sports facilities … to the public.” 48
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 June 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 June 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

Nicky Morgan: First, I do not think [schools and employers] are confused [about the respective functions of the two NCS and CEC]. Secondly, I think the NCS and the new company are doing different things. The company, as we have discussed, is very much employer-led, and I think that is not the case with the NCS. The NCS also focuses particularly on a number of priority groups. I want the new company to be very much about going into schools, with a particular focus on 12 to 18-year-olds. The NCS is an all-age service, although of course they will particularly focus on some younger people and lowskilled adults without a level 3 qualification, as well as NEETs, as we have already discussed, and adults facing redundancy. 55
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House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

In July 2015, Michael Wilshaw, the then Chief Inspector of Schools, raised concerns with the Secretary of State that “potentially high numbers of pupils” were having their name deleted from school admissions registers “without either the schools or the local authorities having an accurate understanding of where those pupils have gone.” He stated that this made it “difficult, if not

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

a young person may have the right to make their own decisions,” and that a blanket right for parents to withdraw their child from sex education is no longer consistent with English caselaw (or with the ECHR and UNCRC). The outcome will be set out in regulations which will be subject to consultation and debate. See Department for Education, Policy Statement: Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education, and Personal, Social, Health, and Economic Education, March 2017

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1398, 10 March 2017: Grammar School Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1398, 10 March 2017: Grammar School Statistics

Feeder primary schools - Grammar schools recruited pupils from a greater range of primary schools in comparison to other state schools. For instance, in selective local authorities, the average number of feeder schools for Grammar schools was more than twice as high as in other state schools (70.1 v 32.7). In areas where there were isolated grammar schools-that is to say where a local authority has at least one grammar school but the student population in grammar schools is less than 10% -the difference in the average number of feeder schools for grammar schools was even greater. This implies that the number of pupils from any given primary school going on to a grammar school will be very small.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

The vast majority of schools already make provision for PSHE and while the Government agrees that making PSHE statutory would give it equal status with other subjects, the Government is concerned that this would do little to tackle the most pressing problems with the subject, which are to do with the variable quality of its provision, as evidenced by Ofsted’s finding that 40% of PSHE teaching is less than good. As such, while we will

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

If a staff member has concerns about a child (as opposed to a child being in immediate danger) then they need to decide what action to take. Where possible this should be discussed with the designated safeguarding lead but any staff member can make a referral to children’s social care; other options could include referral to specialist services or early help services. The local authority should make a decision regarding the action to be taken within one working day of a referral and this should be communicated to the person who made the referral. If the child’s situation does not improve, then the designated safeguarding lead or the person who made the referral should press for re-consideration. Further information on the referral process is provided by paragraphs 21 to 27, and a flow chart on page 10, of guidance. If a child is in immediate danger or is at risk of harm then a referral should be made to children’s social care and/or the police immediately. Similarly, if a teacher discovers that an act of female genital mutilation appears to have been carried out on a girl under the age of 18, this must be reported to the police. 25
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

During the past few years, too many students in our schools system have spent too long preparing for and taking tests in years 10, 11, 12 and 13. During the past decade, we have been in danger of creating an “exam factory” in our schools, particularly in the last four years of education, rather than creating places of deep learning where teachers and students are given the time and space to develop deep knowledge of subjects, rather than just preparing constantly for public examinations. That is one of the key reasons why the Government are making the changes that we are debating today.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

Academies and free schools are state-funded, non-fee-paying schools in England, independent of local authorities. They operate in accordance with their funding agreements with the Secretary of State, and are independent of local authorities (LAs). Maintained schools, on the other hand, have varying degrees of council involvement. Although academies, free schools and maintained schools share many similarities, there are some important differences in terms of the rules and legislation that apply to them.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

Inspectors observed MFL, history and geography lessons at Key Stage 3 in 51 routine inspections carried out during June and July 2015. Inspectors reported significant weaknesses in all three subjects. Too often, inspectors found teaching that failed to challenge and engage pupils. Additionally, low-level disruption in some of these lessons, particularly in MFL, had a detrimental impact on the pupils’ learning. Achievement was not good enough in just under half of the MFL classes observed, two- fifths of the history classes and one third of the geography classes.

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

Inspectors observed MFL, history and geography lessons at Key Stage 3 in 51 routine inspections carried out during June and July 2015. Inspectors reported significant weaknesses in all three subjects. Too often, inspectors found teaching that failed to challenge and engage pupils. Additionally, low-level disruption in some of these lessons, particularly in MFL, had a detrimental impact on the pupils’ learning. Achievement was not good enough in just under half of the MFL classes observed, two- fifths of the history classes and one third of the geography classes.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

Experienced teachers with a degree can achieve QTS without having to do any further training through the assessment only route. This is only available to unqualified teachers who have taught in at least two schools and have taken the professional skills tests (see section 2.5). To achieve QTS through the assessment only route, individuals are required to present evidence that they meet the QTS standards. Their teaching is assessed in a school by an accredited assessment only provider. Further information is available on the Get Into Teaching website and on the Gov.uk website at: Assessment only route to QTS.
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