Top PDF House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number CBP 7976, 12 March 2019 : International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number CBP 7976, 12 March 2019 : International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number CBP 7976, 12 March 2019 : International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

As set out in a previous statement dated June 2016, EU nationals or their family members, currently in higher or further education, and who are eligible to receive loans and/or grants from SFE will continue to remain eligible for these loans and grants until they finish their course. This applies to all student finance provided to eligible EU students by SFE. This includes loans to cover tuition fees (for those resident in the EEA for at least three years), loans and grants for maintenance (for those resident in the UK for at least three years if they started a course before 1st August 2016, and at least five years if they started or will start a course after 1st August 2016, or who are EEA migrant workers), and some other grants and allowances. These students are also entitled to home fee status. This also applies to students who have not yet started their course, but who will do so before the end of the 16/17 Academic Year.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7976, 21 February 2018: International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7976, 21 February 2018: International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

As set out in a previous statement dated June 2016, EU nationals or their family members, currently in higher or further education, and who are eligible to receive loans and/or grants from SFE will continue to remain eligible for these loans and grants until they finish their course. This applies to all student finance provided to eligible EU students by SFE. This includes loans to cover tuition fees (for those resident in the EEA for at least three years), loans and grants for maintenance (for those resident in the UK for at least three years if they started a course before 1st August 2016, and at least five years if they started or will start a course after 1st August 2016, or who are EEA migrant workers), and some other grants and allowances. These students are also entitled to home fee status. This also applies to students who have not yet started their course, but who will do so before the end of the 16/17 Academic Year.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number CBP 7976, 26 September 2019 : International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number CBP 7976, 26 September 2019 : International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

There have been various estimates over the years of the value of education and training 'exports' to the UK (overseas students studying in the UK and some training/consultancy abroad) carried out for the British Council, Universities UK and the Government. These cover a wide range of definitions, years and methodologies. There is a substantial amount of uncertainty about these figures. They are highly approximate estimates only and are often made by groups with an interest in the sector. Estimates include:

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8596: 19 June 2019: Devolution of the Adult Education Budget

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8596: 19 June 2019: Devolution of the Adult Education Budget

As set out above, just under half of the devolved AEB will be allocated to the Greater London Authority. In November 2018, the Mayor of London published a Skills for Londoners Framework, which set out how City Hall aims to achieve the priorities set out in the Skills for Londoners Strategy, published in June 2018. It proposes making a number of changes to the national programme for the delivery of the AEB budget in London. This includes the following eight priorities for reform, in addition to some further areas, outside of the delivery of the statutory entitlements:

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

For the 2018-19 academic year, ITT providers were invited to request training places “based on a realistic assessment of local need and minimum sustainability of their ITT programmes” Fixed allocations were given for undergraduate, Early Years, postgraduate Physical Education and Primary School Direct (salaried) courses and providers could not recruit trainees in excess of their allocation. Recruitment controls were lifted for all other postgraduate courses, meaning that ITT providers had automatic permission to recruit above the number of training places they initially requested, with no cap.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

Teaching and learning funding The funding letter set out a 2015-16 baseline for the AEB of £1.49 billion and stated that this will be maintained in cash terms in 2016-17. The indicative AEB for 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 will be held constant at £1.5 billion. Funding for apprenticeships is initially planned to increase from a 2015-16 baseline of £0.74 billion to £0.93 billion in 2016-17, before increasing further to £1.42 billion by 2019-20. It should be noted that from 2017-18 onwards apprenticeship funding has, in part, been provided via the apprenticeship levy, a charge set at 0.5% of any UK employer’s pay bill in excess of
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

Applicants to nursing by mid-January fell by around 4,500 or 13%. The 2017 figures themselves were down by 20% on the previous year. This was driven by 4,400 fewer applicants from England, where from 2017 new student nurses will no longer be eligible for bursaries to help with the costs of studying. This was a fall of 13%. Nursing students tend to be somewhat older than the general full-time undergraduate intake. The decline in applications to nursing from older groups was even larger. 2

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

The earlier table gave BIS estimates of the face value of fee loans to English students and EU students studying at English institutions. Only part of the face value of fee and maintenance loans paid out in any one year counts as public expenditure. This is what the Government expects the subsidy element to be and is viewed as the permanent costs of the loan to the taxpayer. This system is known as resource accounting and budgeting (RAB) or accruals accounting and has been in place in the public sector for more than a decade. The subsidy element is calculated as the face value of loans made in any one year less the discounted or present value of future repayments. This can be thought of as the amount of money lent to students that the Government does not expect to get back. It is frequently expressed as a proportion of the value of loans, the so-called RAB charge.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP-7501, 14 September 2018: Political disengagement in the UK: who is disengaged?

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP-7501, 14 September 2018: Political disengagement in the UK: who is disengaged?

disabilities in the UK, there are some studies on this phenomenon in the US. It is conceivable that some of the obstacles to voting people with disabilities in the UK and the US face are similar, so that studies in the US may have some value in understanding the situation in the UK. A 2002 study of voting among disabled people in the US showed that 52.6% of respondents with disabilities reported they had voted in the 1998 election, compared to 59.4% of respondents without disabilities – a gap of 6.8%. Controlling for other variables associated with turnout (including age, education and income), this gap increased to 19.6%. 66
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International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

continue to remain eligible for these loans and grants until they finish their course. This applies to all student finance provided to eligible EU students by SFE. This includes loans to cover tuition fees (for those resident in the EEA for at least three years), loans and grants for maintenance (for those resident in the UK for at least three years if they started a course before 1st August 2016, and at least five years if they started or will start a course after 1st August 2016, or who are EEA migrant workers), and some other grants and allowances. These students are also entitled to home fee status. This also applies to students who have not yet started their course, but who will do so before the end of the 16/17 Academic Year.
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8593, 21 August 2019: Support for students with mental health issues in higher education in England

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8593, 21 August 2019: Support for students with mental health issues in higher education in England

There is a strong connection between mental ill health and suicide or self-harm. The ability to identify students who are at risk of suicide is difficult. The Stepchange website states that only 12% of students who died by suicide were reported to be seeing student counselling services. In September 2018 Universities UK (UUK) and PAPYRUS, a national charity dedicated to the prevention of young suicide, published Suicide Safer Universities. This guidance provides a framework to help university staff understand student suicide, mitigate risk, intervene when students get into difficulties, and respond to deaths. The document also aims to help university leaders develop strategies to prevent student suicides. A number of higher education institutions have introduced suicide prevention strategies. The University of Wolverhampton and the University of Cumbria employ Connecting with People and the
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7847, 29 December 2016 : UK Funding from the EU

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7847, 29 December 2016 : UK Funding from the EU

In addition, projects in the UK can be supported by EU institutions with funding that falls outside the EU Budget. Most notably, the European Investment Bank (EIB) – which borrows money on capital markets and lends it on favourable terms to projects that support EU objectives – committed over €29 billion to UK projects between 2011 and 2015. Non-Member States also have access to certain streams of EU funding, though this is typically dependent on payments into the EU Budget – over the 2014-21 period, Norway is contributing around €2.7 billion in EU grants. While the UK Government has made guarantees about the continuation of funding under EU programmes after the UK’s departure from the EU, continued access to any EU funding is likely to be a
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07714, 1 April 2019: The Family Test

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07714, 1 April 2019: The Family Test

I acknowledge that some would like the family test to be a statutory obligation, but feedback from policy makers, and points highlighted in speeches today, suggest that a statutory test could risk becoming a box-ticking exercise at the end of a policy process, with pass or fail outcomes, rather than something embedded at the beginning of the process, which is key. A legislative test would also risk losing the flexibility to adapt and change. 12

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2019: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2019: English Baccalaureate

On 16 June 2015, the then Education Secretary Nicky Morgan made a speech outlining the Government’s plans; a compulsory EBacc would ensure pupils “study the core academic subjects at GCSE, the subjects that keep your options open, and allow you to enter the widest ranges of careers and university courses.” The Secretary of State set out the Government’s view that a compulsory EBacc would enhance the chances of disadvantaged pupils, highlighting that capable pupils are currently less likely to take history, geography, a language or triple science at GCSE than their peers if they are eligible for free school meals. 19
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

4.3 Transparency and accountability will also be enhanced by the requirement for CCGs that are benefitting from the health inequalities funding adjustment to set out for the first time how they are targeting that funding to improve the equity of access and outcomes. The Long-Term Plan renews our commitment to commissioning, partnering with and championing local charities, social enterprises and community interest companies providing services and support to vulnerable and at-risk groups, including Gypsy, Roma and Travellers, which we recognize as leading innovators in their field and key partners in helping us achieving our ambitions to promote equality and reduce health inequalities. 4.4 In addition, the inclusion group of health charities within the Health and Wellbeing Alliance, which includes Friends Families and Travellers, have identified a small number of common themes which would help improve experience and outcomes for
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7647, 11 July 2019 : Early Intervention

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7647, 11 July 2019 : Early Intervention

Systems. These systems bring together the NHS, local authorities and other local partners with the aim of ensuring women and their families receive seamless care, including when moving between maternity or neonatal services or to other services such as primary care or health visiting. By spring 2019, every trust in England with a maternity and neonatal service will be part of the National Maternal and Neonatal Health Safety Collaborative. Every national, regional and local NHS organisation involved in providing safe maternity and neonatal care has a named Maternity Safety Champion. Through the Collaborative and Maternity Safety Champions, the NHS is supporting a culture of multidisciplinary team working and learning, vital for safe, high-quality maternity care. Twenty Community Hubs have been established, focusing on areas with greatest need, and acting as ‘one stop shops’ for women and their families. These hubs work closely with local authorities, bringing together antenatal care, birth facilities, postnatal care, mental health services, specialist services and health visiting services.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

designated as particularly vulnerable. Male Irish travellers in Ireland have a suicide rate 6.6 times higher than the general population; Gypsy Travellers in the Thames Valley have a 100-fold excess risk of measles arising from low immunisation. The report of the Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths in the UK, 1997-99, found that Travellers have ‘possibly the highest maternal death rate among all ethnic groups’. These population health findings based on robust data are stark and require urgent public health focus, including targeted suicide prevention services, a robust system of reporting of infectious diseases in the Gypsy/Traveller population and of levels of immunisation (both currently absent), and a robust system for monitoring maternal mortality (also absent) . 157
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

highest proportion of pupils attending faith schools in 2017 at 42% and 36% respectively. Outer London (20%) had the lowest. At secondary level the North West (31%) and inner London (26%) and had the highest proportion of faith schools and the East of England (12%) and the South West (13%) had the lowest. At a local authority level more than 55% of primary pupils in Rutland, Wigan, Wiltshire, Blackburn, Knowsley and Dorset attended a faith school. In Leicester, Southend, Newham, Waltham Forest, Thurrock, Luton and Nottingham 10-11% did so. The smaller number of secondary schools means that patterns tend to be more extreme. More than half of secondary pupils attended faith schools in Westminster, Kensington and Chelsea, Liverpool, Bolton and Hammersmith and Fulham. There were six authorities that had no religious secondary schools in 2017. 21
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

If these findings are put alongside the data in the table at the end of this paper and the earlier chart we can conclude that ‘state school pupils’ improved their representation at Oxford and Cambridge between the end of the 1930s and end of the 1940s; there appears to have been relatively little change in the late 1950s, but further increases in the 1960s and late 1970s which saw state school pupil numbers draw roughly equal with independent schools at the start of the 1980s. State school participation was higher at Oxford, on the measures given here, up to the mid-1960s. However, given there are large gaps this may not necessarily have been the case in each and every year.
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