Top PDF House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

As regards children with statements of SEN which name schools as the appropriate placement for a child but parents decide to educate such a child at home, it remains the local authority’s duty to ensure that the child’s needs are met through the provision made by the parents. The local authority can support parents financially in these circumstances under section 319 or section 19 of the Education Act 1996 (this would fall under either paragraph 18 or paragraph 20 of Schedule 2 to the School and Early Years Finance (England) Regulations 2012). In deciding how much support is needed, the local authority should be aware that, unlike schools, parents do not receive base funding from the public purse in support of SEN, and should not therefore be expected to pay £10,000 before they receive any support.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

Education Act 1996 they do have a duty to make arrangements to identify children in their area who are not receiving a suitable education. 21 The DfE’s guidance for local authorities explains that, while the law does not assume that a child is not being suitably educated if they are not attending school full-time, it does require local authorities to enquire what education is being provided. 22 There are no detailed requirements as to how a system of oversight should work, and it is for each local authority to decide its approach. However, the guidance emphasises that a proportional approach needs to be taken and local authorities should not exert more oversight than is actually needed when parents are providing a suitable education. It recommends that an authority should ordinarily make contact with home educating parents on at least an annual basis so that it can reasonably inform itself of the suitability of the education provided. 23
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

Local authorities have no statutory duties in relation to monitoring the quality of home education on a routine basis. However, they do have duties to make arrangements to identify children not receiving a suitable education, and to intervene if it appears that they are not. Intervention could, for example, take the form of issuing a school attendance order, although Government guidance on home education encourages authorities to address the issue informally before serving such a notice. As part of their safeguarding duties local authorities have powers to insist on seeing a child to enquire about their welfare where there are grounds for concern, but this does not extend to seeing and questioning children for the purpose of establishing whether they are receiving a suitable education.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

63 Education Secretary announces 6 new opportunity areas, Department for Education, 18 January 2017. Box 6: Opportunity Areas On 4 October 2016, the then Education Secretary, Justine Greening, announced £60 million of funding for six ‘Opportunity Areas’ to help them “address the biggest challenges they face”. The six areas were Blackpool, Derby, Norwich, Oldham, Scarborough, and West Somerset. It was stated that the areas would be given prioritised access to a wider support package, including a £75 million teaching and leadership innovation fund “focused on supporting teachers and school leaders in challenging areas to develop.” 61 £10 million of the funding is available for teachers in opportunity areas and category 5 and 6 areas to take the new National Professional Qualification for Middle Leadership. 62
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7905, 22 January 2017: Adult ESOL in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7905, 22 January 2017: Adult ESOL in England

The argument for an ESOL strategy The report highlighted the funding reductions to the ESOL sector since 2007 and argued that waiting lists were “at an all-time high” and that “people who want to learn English find that both entitlement to learning and the number of places have dramatically reduced” 57 It also contended that the Government’s emphasis on integration had “not translated into a coherent strategy for ESOL provision in England” and that ESOL policy suffered from a lack of co-ordination, with the Department for Education in the lead, but the Department for Work and Pensions, the Home Office and the Department for Communities and Local Government also having roles. 58
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

least April 2021. An equality analysis was produced alongside the consultation response. 13 This looked at the impact on different types of ‘protected characteristics’ such as age, sex, disability and ethnicity. The Spending Review and Autumn Statement 2015 made some headline announcements about funding paid through the funding council, the extension of maintenance loans to part-time students and new loans for Master’s degrees. It also announced that the discount rate applied to loans would be reduced to 0.7% and set the spending totals for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills which will eventually feedthrough to annual funding allocations for higher education.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

give parents a real choice of school, either a mainstream or special school. We will remove the bias towards inclusion and propose to strengthen parental choice by improving the range and diversity of schools from which parents can choose, making sure they are aware of the options available to them and by changing statutory guidance for local authorities. Parents of children with statements of SEN will be able to express a preference for any state-funded school – including special schools, Academies and Free Schools – and have their preference met unless it would not meet the needs of the child, be incompatible with the efficient education of other children, or be an inefficient use of resources. We will also prevent the unnecessary closure of special schools by giving parents and community groups the power to take them over 11
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

funding and student support in England from 2012/13. The estimated RAB rate on new loans was put at ‘around 30%’, but subsequently increased to ‘around 35%’ 25 then to 35%-40% 26 , revised upwards again to ‘around 40%’ 27 and later to ‘around 45%’. 28 These increases were largely due to changes in economic forecasts, particularly on earnings. 29 These less optimistic forecast reduce the expected cash value of repayments and or delay when they will be made. Other factors behind the increase in the RAB rate include the higher than expected level of average tuition fee loans, a change to the timing of repayment threshold uprating, lower assumed repayments from the extra students who start higher education because the numbers cap is lifted 30 and improvements to the Governments loan repayment model which is used to forecast repayments and hence calculate the resource costs of
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

Westminster Academy. 3 Further details were set out in the schools white paper, The Importance of Teaching, published in November 2010: 4.21 In most European countries school students are expected to pursue a broad and rounded range of academic subjects until the age of 16. Even in those countries such as the Netherlands where students divide between academic and vocational routes all young people are expected, whatever their ultimate destiny, to study a wide range of traditional subjects. So we will introduce a new award – the English Baccalaureate – for any student who secures good GCSE or iGCSE passes in English, mathematics, the sciences, a modern or ancient foreign language and a humanity such as history or geography. This combination of GCSEs at grades A*-C will entitle the student to a certificate recording their
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

The PSHE Association was strongly critical of the decision, with the Association’s Chief Executive, Joe Hayman, describing it as “an appalling failure,” and stating that: What is most baffling about this decision is that the Government has a range of objectives it seeks to achieve through PSHE education, including teaching pupils to stay safe online, promoting children and young people’s mental health and preventing radicalisation, child sexual exploitation and violence against women and girls. Its decision not to address a status quo in which these issues are addressed by untrained teachers in inadequate curriculum time – or left off the curriculum altogether – is self-defeating and leaves vulnerable young people at risk. 29
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

It would neither be practical or desirable to artificially curb the sale of school playing fields, when such disposals may represent the most effective use of public assets. Often changes are made to education provision, such as school closures or mergers, which mean it is no longer necessary to retain playing fields for school use. In such cases it is only right that local communities are able to benefit from space that otherwise would not be used. Converting surplus or unwanted assets to invest in school grounds has benefits that extend far beyond the school gates. No operating school has disposed of its entire playing field.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07169, 20 April 2017: The School System in England

1. The School System in England This briefing offers a short introduction to the types of state-funded schools in England and how they differ from each other. Schools policy is a devolved area, and different arrangements are in place in the other countries of the UK.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

achieved solely by increasing the PAN in line with the School Admissions Code. 14 In the case of community, foundation and voluntary schools, local authorities can also propose that a school’s premises be enlarged by following a streamlined statutory process set out in regulations. 15 Academies wishing to enlarge their premises need to seek approval from the Secretary of State, through the Education Funding Agency (EFA). They are not required to submit a formal business case to the EFA unless the expansion is very large scale or increases pupil numbers to 2,000 or more. Further information is contained in advice published by the Department for Education in March 2016, Making significant changes to an open academy. 16
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7966, 18 January 2019: Part-time undergraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7966, 18 January 2019: Part-time undergraduate students in England

“I welcome the Government’s introduction of maintenance loans for part-time students in today’s Budget. With part-time students more likely to be from under-represented groups, this is an important step in making higher education more accessible, and I hope it will help reverse the troubling decline in part-time student numbers we have seen in recent years [note 1]. I also encourage universities and colleges to continue to think about how they can attract and support part-time learners, for example through

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049, 29 January 2019: Postgraduate loans in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049, 29 January 2019: Postgraduate loans in England

1.2 Concerns Concerns were raised that some potential students risked missing out on the opportunities offered by postgraduate study because of difficulties with funding. 3 The potential impact on disadvantaged groups was highlighted as a particular issue. An independent review of social mobility undertaken by Alan Milburn in 2012, for example, described the lack of funding options for postgraduate students as a “social mobility time bomb.” 4 Similarly, a 2012 report from the Higher Education Commission noted that postgraduate qualifications were becoming a “de facto requirement for employment” and warned that
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

Agencies that specialise in temporary workers usually retain the temporary agency worker on their payroll. Therefore these companies can have payrolls over the £3million threshold despite small number of staff working directly for the company. The REC argues that this means that small to medium sized recruiters, specialising in temporary agency workers, will be unfairly captured by the levy. The REC also argues that opportunities to take advantage of apprenticeships are limited for recruitment agencies specialising in temporary employees. This is because apprenticeships tend to last longer than agency workers are contracted for.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

work based learning. 3 This number was around 56% of those in receipt of EMA in 2010. Funding is allocated to individual schools and colleges to distribute to students under their own criteria. For most institutions this funding is calculated by applying their EMA eligible student rate from 2009/10 to their latest student numbers and, in 2016/17, multiplying by £298 to their total allocation. 4 In 2014/15 direct funding for free meals in further education was introduced to give parity with those attending school sixth forms. In 2016/17 £15 million was removed from discretionary bursary funding to balance out this direct funding which was previously supported on a discretionary basis through the 16-19 bursary fund. 5 Will a particular student be eligible for a discretionary bursary?
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

The response set out the following reasons a child might not be entered for the EBacc: The decision not to enter a pupil for the EBacc combination of subjects will need to be considered on a case by case basis by each school, and schools will need to take into account a range of factors particular to each pupil. These will include, for example, complex SEN; having spent significant amounts of time out of education; recently arriving in the country; and only being able to take a limited number of key stage 4 qualifications as significant additional time is needed in the curriculum for English and mathematics. We believe that no single factor should automatically exclude a pupil from entering the EBacc. 34
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 18 April 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 18 April 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

‘rebrokerage’ of the academy). If the academy that was judged inadequate was previously a ‘standalone’ academy, this will generally mean it will join a multi-academy trust (MAT). The academy will remain open, and the RSC and the new academy trust will work to ensure minimal disruption to pupils’ education during the transition. In some exceptional cases, where the academy is not considered viable in the long term, the RSC can move to terminate the funding agreement in order to close it. 8

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

There are some exceptions to this rule for full-time students taking courses in medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, architecture, social work and undergraduate Initial Teacher Training (ITT). For further information see page 41 of Student Finance England’s eligibility guidance. 22 Students with an honours degree may also currently be able to access tuition fee loans for a part-time degree in engineering, technology or computer science. 23 In addition, in July 2016 it was confirmed that from 2017-18 the ELQ rules would be relaxed further to allow students starting part-time second degrees in the following STEM subjects to be eligible for tuition fee loans: subjects allied to medicine; biological sciences;
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