Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 28 March 2017: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 28 March 2017: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 28 March 2017: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

Box 4: An insolvency regime for colleges The Government expects the area review process to “stabilise the financial position of the sector” and leave “each continuing college…in a financially resilient position.” 36 However, it has additionally noted that the area review process does not remove the possibility of colleges failing financially in the future. 37 With regards to what will happen in the event of future financial failure, the Government intends to introduce an insolvency regime, including a Special Administration Regime, for FE and sixth-form colleges, which would come into effect “around the end of the implementation of the area review process.” 38 The area review guidance notes that the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 does not currently include provision for colleges to close other than by transferring their assets and liabilities to another willing provider and states that “there should be a process which allows them to close in an orderly way which protects learners.” 39
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

The report concluded that it was unclear how the area reviews would “deliver a more robust and sustainable further education sector”: It is unclear how area-based reviews of post-16 education, which are limited in scope, will deliver a more robust and sustainable further education sector. The departments appear to see the national programme of area-based reviews, which they announced in July 2015, as a fix-all solution to the sector’s problems. But the reviews have the potential to be haphazard, and it is too early to speculate on whether they will lead to significant improvements in local provision. Each review only covers further education and sixth form colleges, and does not include school and academy sixth forms or other types of provider. If a review concluded, for example, that there was over- provision of education for 16- to 19-year-olds in an area, it is not clear that this conclusion would have any influence over decisions regarding provision by local schools and academies. The
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

work based learning. 3 This number was around 56% of those in receipt of EMA in 2010. Funding is allocated to individual schools and colleges to distribute to students under their own criteria. For most institutions this funding is calculated by applying their EMA eligible student rate from 2009/10 to their latest student numbers and, in 2016/17, multiplying by £298 to their total allocation. 4 In 2014/15 direct funding for free meals in further education was introduced to give parity with those attending school sixth forms. In 2016/17 £15 million was removed from discretionary bursary funding to balance out this direct funding which was previously supported on a discretionary basis through the 16-19 bursary fund. 5 Will a particular student be eligible for a discretionary bursary?
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5440, 20 March 2017: Higher Education Finance Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5440, 20 March 2017: Higher Education Finance Statistics

1. Background –the HE sector post financial crisis and Browne The higher education sector is braced for a future where income does not always grow year-on-year, student numbers do not always go up, the balance of income streams is less predictable and cuts may have to be made. In some cases this scenario has already arrived. Many of the sector’s income streams are not planned in advance and we do not know how they have changed at an aggregate level until almost around 10 months after the end of the academic year. Only funding body grants are known at an institutional level for the current and upcoming academic year. These made up just under 39% of total income in 2011/12, but as they set the parameters for funded home and EU student numbers and research activity they have a direct effect on variable fee income and other income streams.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

The PSHE Association was strongly critical of the decision, with the Association’s Chief Executive, Joe Hayman, describing it as “an appalling failure,” and stating that: What is most baffling about this decision is that the Government has a range of objectives it seeks to achieve through PSHE education, including teaching pupils to stay safe online, promoting children and young people’s mental health and preventing radicalisation, child sexual exploitation and violence against women and girls. Its decision not to address a status quo in which these issues are addressed by untrained teachers in inadequate curriculum time – or left off the curriculum altogether – is self-defeating and leaves vulnerable young people at risk. 29
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

The findings of this study have also highlighted challenges for the future of PE and sport in primary schools. To sustain the impact of the premium, schools have used it to invest in training for existing staff. However, a question remains over how to maintain this investment in CPD for new teachers entering the profession, once premium funding ends. Schools also raised issues related to sourcing good quality provision in their local area, and may need further support to robustly assess the quality of the provision available. The survey also found that monitoring and evaluation of the premium was not consistent and schools may require further advice and guidance to support them to first assess impacts and then put in place strategies for continuing quality improvement. 19
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07250, 8 March 2017: University Technical Colleges

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07250, 8 March 2017: University Technical Colleges

In December 2015, the Government confirmed in a response to a Parliamentary Question that student applications for UTCs were being encouraged: Nick Boles: Like all academies, each university technical college (UTC) is responsible for publicising their school and encouraging applications. Officials from the Department for Education and the Baker Dearing Educational Trust provide UTCs with advice to support pupil recruitment, drawing on the best practice from UTCs and other new schools. Statutory guidance to schools on careers guidance is clear that they should allow UTCs to engage with their pupils on their premises. This guidance can be found at GOV.UK:https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/careers- guidance-provision-for-young-people-in-schools. This careers guidance should ensure pupils have information about their full range of education and training options. 22
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1398, 10 March 2017: Grammar School Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1398, 10 March 2017: Grammar School Statistics

In 2008 the then Department for Children, Schools and Families looked at the intake of grammar schools in comparison to that of their local area. This found that free school meal rates in grammars were not representative of their local areas. They were around one-fifth of the level in their local area in 2007. In addition they also had fewer pupils from the low attaining ethnic groups, Black African, Black Caribbean, Bangladeshi and Pakistani, than their local area. The gap varied somewhat by ethnic group, but was typically around half the rate in their local area in 2007. This study also looked at the level of deprivation affecting children in the areas that different types of schools took their pupils from. In grammar schools in 2007 the proportion of pupils from the least deprived quartile was just over 40%, compared to around 25% in their local area. The proportion of their intake from the most deprived quartile was around 8%, compared to just over 20% in their
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7919, 10 March 2017: Spring Budget 2017: A summary

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7919, 10 March 2017: Spring Budget 2017: A summary

There were a variety of reactions to the Government’s proposed reforms. In the first day of the Budget debates after the Budget speech, the Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn noted, “we have long argued for a clampdown on bogus self-employment, but today the Chancellor seems to have put the burden on self-employed workers instead. There has to be a something-for-something deal, so I hope the Chancellor will bring forward extra social security in return.” 48 Andrew Tyrie, Chair of the Treasury Committee, noted the Chancellor’s “strong argument for matching what people get out of NICs on the receipt side to the contribution side”, though on the question of whether the rise in Class 4 contravened the tax lock he added, “I will no doubt have a further discussion [with the Chancellor] when he comes before the Treasury Committee.” 49
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House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

The report also welcomed the Government’s tightening of regulations on pupil registration (see box 3) but noted that it only had the potential to improve the tracking of children who had been attending school before they are withdrawn. The report stated that “further action is necessary to cover children who are home educated without ever having attended school – otherwise there will always be a cohort of pupils who are not known to local authorities and the opportunity to abuse the system will remain.” 44

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

in some areas. Among other things, it stated that the Government would provide £170 million of capital funding for the creation of Institutes of Technology, and would explore how to create a similar platform to UCAS for technical education. The March 2017 Budget announced that the number of programme hours for 16-19 year olds on technical education routes would be increased to “over 900 years on average.” It stated that this would result in £500 million of additional funding per year once all the routes are fully implemented. The Budget additionally announced that further education maintenance loans will be available for students on level 4 to 6 technical education courses at National Colleges from 2019-20.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

2015-16, with the addition of funding for 24+ Advanced Learner Loans and the Employer Ownership pilots from 2013-14 onwards. 14 Box 3: Advanced Learner Loans From 2013-14, grant funding for leaners aged 24 and over studying at levels 3 and 4 (e.g. A-levels) was removed and replaced with Advanced Learner Loans. Initially, loans also replaced grants for apprentices aged 24 and over studying at level 3 and above. However, loans for apprentices were dropped from February 2014 onwards, in part due to low take-up, and higher level apprenticeships were instead made eligible for grant funding from the ASB. 15 The Spending Review 2015 announced plans to expand eligibility for Advanced Learner Loans to 19-23 year olds studying at levels 3 and 4, and to learners aged 19 and over studying at levels 5 and 6. 16 The availability of loans does not replace the entitlement to full grant funding for learners aged 19-23 undertaking their first level 3 qualification. 17
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

should approach transport to faith schools and the consideration that should be given to relevant issues, such as equality: 38. Many parents will choose to send their children to a school as near as possible to their home. However, some parents choose to send their children to a school with a particular ethos because they adhere to a particular faith, or belief. Local authorities need to respect parents’ religious and philosophical convictions as to the education to be provided for their children, give careful consideration to discrimination issues and seek legal opinion if they are unsure about the effect of their policies, before publishing them each year.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

In a Westminster Hall debate on AS levels and A levels in April 2013, the then Schools Minister, David Laws, explained why the Government were making the changes: ...We want to give students a better experience of post-16 study, ensuring they are studying for rigorous qualifications that will provide them with the right skills and knowledge to allow them to progress. Students currently start A-levels in September and then they immediately start preparing for examinations in January. They and their teachers have spent too much time thinking about exams and re-sitting them, encouraging in some cases a “learn and forget” approach. A student taking A-level maths would need to sit six exams: three papers for their AS-level, and three for their A2. The old rules allowed multiple re-sitting of those papers, so a student might sit some papers in January, and if they wanted to improve their grades they could re-sit them in June and again the following year, while sitting and then re-sitting their A2 papers. In 2010, 74% of maths A-level students re-sat at least one paper.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

The Department for Education now publishes performance data for MATs. How do parents get places for their children at an academy? Academies can decide for themselves how they will prioritise applicants for school places, but they have to comply with national fair admission rules in doing this. Regardless of a state school’s legal status, parents usually apply to their home local authority for school places, although there are limited exceptions. Parents and carers whose application for a place at an academy is refused have the right of appeal.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

In a Westminster Hall debate on AS levels and A levels in April 2013, the then Schools Minister, David Laws, explained why the Government were making the changes: ...We want to give students a better experience of post-16 study, ensuring they are studying for rigorous qualifications that will provide them with the right skills and knowledge to allow them to progress. Students currently start A-levels in September and then they immediately start preparing for examinations in January. They and their teachers have spent too much time thinking about exams and re-sitting them, encouraging in some cases a “learn and forget” approach. A student taking A-level maths would need to sit six exams: three papers for their AS-level, and three for their A2. The old rules allowed multiple re-sitting of those papers, so a student might sit some papers in January, and if they wanted to improve their grades they could re-sit them in June and again the following year, while sitting and then re-sitting their A2 papers. In 2010, 74% of maths A-level students re-sat at least one paper.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

and Advanced Learner Loans declined from £2.48 billion in 2010-11 to £1.82 billion in 2015-16 – a reduction of 26% in cash terms and 31% in real terms. 26 The other major components of the adult FE teaching and learning budget saw little change in cash terms over the period. Funding for community learning was held at £211 million per year until 2014-15, before increasing slightly to £216 million in 2015-16 in order to provide an additional £5 million for pilot courses to help adults recover from mild to moderate mental illness. 27 Funding for the Offender Learning and Skills Service decreased slightly from the 2010-11 baseline of
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

The PSHE Association was strongly critical of the decision, with the Association’s Chief Executive, Joe Hayman, describing it as “an appalling failure,” and stating that: What is most baffling about this decision is that the Government has a range of objectives it seeks to achieve through PSHE education, including teaching pupils to stay safe online, promoting children and young people’s mental health and preventing radicalisation, child sexual exploitation and violence against women and girls. Its decision not to address a status quo in which these issues are addressed by untrained teachers in inadequate curriculum time – or left off the curriculum altogether – is self-defeating and leaves vulnerable young people at risk. 37
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

loans. 27 Much more detail on these increases are given in the paper HE in England from 2012: Funding and finance Post 2015 reforms The different elements of the changes to student finance announced in the Summer Budget all have an impact on student loan outlays and the RAB rate/charge. Replacing maintenance grants with loans will increase the cash amount loaned. This on its own would increase the RAB rate, but as the increase will be largely for those from lower income

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

purpose of which was to support the participation and attainment of children from BME groups, including Gypsies and Travellers, as well as children with English as an additional language. Currently, it is up to local authorities (in consultation with bodies called Schools Forums) to decide how to share out DSG funding between schools in their area, and to decide how much to retain for shared services or functions. In doing so, they must have regard to DfE guidance. Some local authority areas provide a Traveller education service, but this is not a statutory requirement.

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