Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

community’s perceived need and develop a sense of ownership. Mainstream services: Even though one of the most widely implemented strategies has been the ‘dedicated health visitor’, this should not necessarily be seen as an example of best practice. In fact, Travellers do not want dedicated services, but would much rather be able to access the same high quality services as everyone else, which will also reduce ‘singling out’ (PCC Framework, 2009). Poor living conditions and environmental factors are the single most influential contributing factor to the poor health status of Gypsies and Travellers, including stress. This makes partnership working between the different agencies, including the NHS, Local Authorities Social Services, Housing and Environmental Health, and voluntary sector organisations, even more important to provide a coordinated response to these inter-related issues. 94
Show more

53 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

The fourth area that my hon. Friend raised was planning policy. He described the imbalance between the number of sites in some areas compared with others, particularly in his county. The Government’s planning policy for Traveller sites confirms that our aims include that local planning authorities should make their own assessment of need for the purposes of planning and, working together with neighbouring authorities, identify land for sites. Local planning authorities should consider the production of joint development plans that set targets on a cross-authority basis to provide more flexibility in identifying sites. The policy is clear that local planning authorities should ensure that sites in rural areas respect the scale of, and do not dominate, the nearest settled community. In exceptional cases when a local planning authority is burdened by a large-scale unauthorised site that has significantly increased its need, and where the area is subject to strict and special planning constraints, there is no assumption that the authority has to plan to meet its Traveller site needs in full. 83
Show more

79 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

designated as particularly vulnerable. Male Irish travellers in Ireland have a suicide rate 6.6 times higher than the general population; Gypsy Travellers in the Thames Valley have a 100-fold excess risk of measles arising from low immunisation. The report of the Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths in the UK, 1997-99, found that Travellers have ‘possibly the highest maternal death rate among all ethnic groups’. These population health findings based on robust data are stark and require urgent public health focus, including targeted suicide prevention services, a robust system of reporting of infectious diseases in the Gypsy/Traveller population and of levels of immunisation (both currently absent), and a robust system for monitoring maternal mortality (also absent) . 157
Show more

79 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

It is this Government’s policy that all good and outstanding schools should be able to expand to offer excellent places to local students. The Weald of Kent Grammar School is one of the top performing schools in the country, with 99% of its students achieving five A*-C grades in GCSE exams in 2014, and 98% of sixth form students achieving at least 3 A-Levels at grades A*-E. The Weald of Kent Grammar School submitted a proposal for expansion in 2013. At that stage the then Secretary of State could not approve the proposal as an expansion because the proposal at that time was for a mixed sex annexe when the existing school was single sex. The school submitted a revised proposal in September 2015 under which girls will be educated on both sites alongside a mixed sex sixth form. I am satisfied that this proposal represents a genuine expansion of the existing school, and that there will be integration between the two sites in terms of leadership, management, governance, admissions and curriculum. I am also satisfied that the excellent quality of learning currently delivered will be replicated across the newly expanded school. I welcome the fact that the newly expanded school will better meet the needs of parents in the local area, with 41% of existing pupils at the Weald of Kent Grammar School already travelling from the Sevenoaks area.
Show more

28 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7581, 12 July 2017: Children: Introduction of 30 hours of free childcare in September 2017 (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7581, 12 July 2017: Children: Introduction of 30 hours of free childcare in September 2017 (England)

This new “extended entitlement” is due to be introduced from September 2017 across England, with some parents in pilot and “early innovator” areas benefitting earlier. In the 2015 Spending Review, the Government announced an extra £300 million to increase the national average funding rate for free childcare for 3 and 4 year olds to £4.88 (although the actual rate paid to providers will be determined by local authorities). In addition, £100 million of capital funding has been allocated to create 18,000 additional places.

18 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

In 2016 the Government announced that the funding of healthcare students would be reformed. Following a consultation, from 1 August 2017 NHS Bursaries for students starting courses in nursing, midwifery and other allied health professions (AHP) were abolished and these students became funded in the same way as all other full-time undergraduate students. The changes were brought in under the Education (Student Fees, Awards and Support) (Amendment) Regulations 2017 SI 114.

18 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

Funding for school PE and sport forms part of the Dedicated Schools Grant, which is not broken down by subject or curriculum area. In addition, since 2013-14, around £160 million of ring-fenced funding has been provided per year to primary schools through the Primary PE and Sport Premium. The Government has committed to continue providing the funding until 2020. The March 2016 Budget announced that revenue from the new soft drinks levy would be used to “double the primary school PE and sport premium from £160 million per year to £320 million per year from September 2017.”
Show more

32 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

Patterns in modern language entry at A-level are shown in the chart above and in the second table at the end of this section. The broad direction of trends are similar to GCSE’s, with a long term drop in French and German entries, and an increase in Spanish and ‘other’. The period of particularly rapid decline in French shown here, was during the late 1990s, where entries fell from almost 23,000 to just over 15,000. Spanish overtook German as the second most common modern language at A-level in 2008, and was only around 700 entries below French in 2017.

30 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

Working-age non-parents were the only major demographic group not to see a fall in relative poverty between 2007–08 and 2012–13 (although there was a fall when looking just at the change between 2011–12 and 2012–13; however, this was not significant). This is a group who are, on average, more reliant on earnings and less reliant on benefits than children and pensioners, even when focusing only on low income groups. In 2012–13, benefits made up 88% of household income for the poorest 30% of pensioners, 62% for the poorest 30% of children and 38% for the poorest 30% of working-age non-parents. This helps to explain why they benefited less from the rise in benefits relative to earnings during the recession. In addition, working-age adults without dependent children are relatively likely to be young adults, and […] adults aged under 30 saw the largest falls in wages and employment rates during the recession. 8
Show more

37 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07914, 29 March 2017: Medical school places in England from September 2018

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07914, 29 March 2017: Medical school places in England from September 2018

The GMC […] welcomes the recent government announcement that there will be an expansion by 1,500 of the number of UK medical students. Obviously these will not graduate until 2023 at the earliest and therefore will not be fully trained as GPs until 2028 or hospital specialists until 2033. In the interim, we will all need to think creatively about retaining new graduates, re- integrating those who have had time out, dissuading older doctors from retiring early, and recognising that 35% of doctors currently working in the UK qualified in the EEA or further abroad. The strong contribution of EEA and international medical
Show more

17 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number SN05871, 16 August 2017: Youth unemployment statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number SN05871, 16 August 2017: Youth unemployment statistics

The unemployment rate for people aged 18-24 was 10.8% in April-June 2017, down from 11.8% a year ago. 434,000 18-24 year olds were unemployed, while 1.68 million were economically inactive (not in work and not looking or available for work). 3.58 million were in work.

6 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

The 2015 Sport Strategy, Sporting Future, stated that a working group would be established in early 2016 to advise on how to ensure that no child leaves school unable to meet a minimum capability in swimming. The report of the Curriculum Swimming and Water Safety Review Group was published in July 2017. It stated that almost a third (31 per cent) of Year 6 pupils finish primary schools without being able to swim and without basic water safety skills. The report made 16 recommendations for Government, the education sector and the leisure industry aimed at ensuring that “all children leave primary school with an appropriate level of swimming and water safety ability.” 4 In the second annual
Show more

32 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

In December 2017, the DfE published a research report looking at the costs of providing further education at levels 4 and 5 in STEM subjects. The report concluded that higher apprenticeships at levels 4 and 5 face wide variations in their operating margins, the main driver of which is staff salaries. It added that the findings did not support the assumption that providers may choose not to offer STEM qualifications due to the investment required in equipment. 80

30 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1398, 10 March 2017: Grammar School Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1398, 10 March 2017: Grammar School Statistics

In 2008 the then Department for Children, Schools and Families looked at the intake of grammar schools in comparison to that of their local area. This found that free school meal rates in grammars were not representative of their local areas. They were around one-fifth of the level in their local area in 2007. In addition they also had fewer pupils from the low attaining ethnic groups, Black African, Black Caribbean, Bangladeshi and Pakistani, than their local area. The gap varied somewhat by ethnic group, but was typically around half the rate in their local area in 2007. This study also looked at the level of deprivation affecting children in the areas that different types of schools took their pupils from. In grammar schools in 2007 the proportion of pupils from the least deprived quartile was just over 40%, compared to around 25% in their local area. The proportion of their intake from the most deprived quartile was around 8%, compared to just over 20% in their
Show more

15 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

Following the EU referendum on 23 June 2016, the Government announced that EU students applying for a place at an English higher education institution in the 2017-18 academic year will continue to be eligible for the same funding and support as they are now, and that their eligibility will continue throughout their course, even if the UK exits the EU during that period. The Government has stated that it is working to ensure that EU students applying for a place in 2018-19 will have information about their eligibility for funding “well in advance” of the application round opening in September 2017.
Show more

17 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

Performance was higher on average at faith schools across all the other headline performance indicators. However, pupil intake differs between in faith and non-faith schools, both background characteristics (such as free school meal eligibility) and their prior attainment, so headline results may not give us the most meaningful comparisons. The table below summarises a range of 2016 secondary performance data for faith and non-faith schools and gives some background data on intake. Pupils at faith schools were less likely to have low prior attainment when starting secondary school, more likely to have high prior attainment and less likely to be eligible for free school meals or be looked after by their local authority. When the attainment 8 results are broken down by prior attainment bands the faith/non-faith gap falls to a single percentage point in each band. There were similar gaps in the English and maths measure. Progress 8 takes prior attainment into account and while the average at faith schools was higher and statistically significant the absolute difference was small at around one grade higher per subject for one in every fourteen pupils. 25
Show more

19 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07250, 8 March 2017: University Technical Colleges

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07250, 8 March 2017: University Technical Colleges

This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

18 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

We should acknowledge that the curriculum always involves trade-offs: more time on one subject means less time on others. Over the years, I’ve been asked to add scores of subjects - from intellectual property, to Esperanto, to den building - to the national curriculum. Many of these are important and interesting. The question, though, is always whether they are sufficiently important to justify reducing the time available for the existing subjects in the curriculum, and I make no apology for protecting space for the English Baccalaureate subjects wherever possible. That is not to say, of course, that subjects outside the English Baccalaureate have no place in schools. The EBacc is a specific, limited measure consisting of only 5 subject areas and up to 8 GCSEs. Whilst this means that there are several valuable subjects which are not included, it also means that there is time for most pupils to study other subjects in addition to the EBacc, including vocational and technical disciplines which are also vital to future economic growth.
Show more

25 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2019: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2019: English Baccalaureate

We should acknowledge that the curriculum always involves trade-offs: more time on one subject means less time on others. Over the years, I’ve been asked to add scores of subjects - from intellectual property, to Esperanto, to den building - to the national curriculum. Many of these are important and interesting. The question, though, is always whether they are sufficiently important to justify reducing the time available for the existing subjects in the curriculum, and I make no apology for protecting space for the English Baccalaureate subjects wherever possible. That is not to say, of course, that subjects outside the English Baccalaureate have no place in schools. The EBacc is a specific, limited measure consisting of only 5 subject areas and up to 8 GCSEs. Whilst this means that there are several valuable subjects which are not included, it also means that there is time for most pupils to study other subjects in addition to the EBacc, including vocational and technical disciplines which are also vital to future economic growth.
Show more

27 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

The next stage of the reforms was announced on 17 September 2012 when the then Education Secretary, Michael Gove, made an oral statement in the House of Commons. This was made against the background of concern about the grading of GCSEs in English. Mr Gove announced that the Government intended to replace GCSEs with new qualifications, to be called English Baccalaureate Certificates (EBCs), which would cover the core academic subjects that make up the current English Baccalaureate – English, Mathematics, sciences, history, geography and languages. He also proposed a single awarding
Show more

20 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...

Related subjects