Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08117, 7 June 2018: Sexual harassment in education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08117, 7 June 2018: Sexual harassment in education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08117, 7 June 2018: Sexual harassment in education

The governing bodies of higher and further education institutions are public authorities for the purposes of the PSED. Universities and colleges must therefore have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination and harassment and the need to foster good relationships between different groups when they formulate policies and practices in areas such as: sexual harassment, governance of student societies and sports teams, campus security, housing, bars and social spaces. The duty applies to decisions on individual cases, as well as to policy decisions.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

Updated guidance Following a consultation, revised Keeping children safe in education guidance will come into force from 3 September 2018. The main difference with the current guidance is the inclusion of a new section setting out principles for schools to consider when responding to reports of child on child sexual violence and sexual harassment. Until the revised guidance commences the version of Keeping children safe in education published in 2016 is still in force and is what schools must continue to have regard to. The final section of the briefing provides further information.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

The fall in full-time undergraduate entrants between 2010/11 and 2012/13 was concentrated in courses other than first degrees. Entrants to these courses fell by 35%. Just over half of the fall was due to changes in nursing qualifications, which shifted from diplomas to degrees. Among other courses taught at higher education institutions the largest absolute fall was almost 8,000 in foundation degrees. 6 These trends have continued and in 2014 they said that “Higher education institutions appear to be existing the market for study below degree level and focussing their undergraduate provision around degree courses.” There has been an increase to these courses at further
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 18 June 2018: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 18 June 2018: Student Loan Statistics

The Government gradually introduced new arrangements for students starting in autumn 1998 (academic year 1998/99). In the first year new entrants received support through loans and grants. The maximum maintenance grant available was £1,000 less than that for existing students. This was compensated for by a matching increase in loan entitlement. Most new entrants were also expected make an income-assessed contribution of up to £1,000 a year to the cost of their tuition. From 1999 new entrants and those who started in 1998 received all maintenance support as loans which were partly income-assessed. A different repayment system operates for loans for new students from 1998. These are income contingent repayments where graduates repay 9% of gross income annual above £10,000. 6 This threshold was raised to £15,000 in April 2000. The last Government planned to receive this level in 2010, but did not alter its level. The Coalition Government announced that the repayment thresholds for students with income contingent loans who started higher education before 2012/13 will be increased in line with inflation until 2016. 7
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

Single and small academy trusts and sixth form colleges were able to bid for funding through the Condition Improvement Fund, with guidance published by the Education and Skills Funding Agency stating that the HPCF “is intended to improve children’s and young people’s physical and mental health by enhancing access to facilities for physical activity, healthy eating, mental health and wellbeing and medical conditions, such as kitchens, dining facilities, changing rooms, playgrounds and sports facilities.” 33 In March 2018 the Education and Skills Funding Agency published the list of schools who had successfully bid for funding from the Condition Improvement Fund. £38 million will be provided for specific projects supported by the HPCF in 2018-19. 34 Local authorities, large multi-academy trusts and other bodies are not eligible to bid for the Condition Improvement Fund and instead receive School Condition Allocations (SCA). They will receive a direct allocation from the HPCF in addition to their normal SCA for 2018-19. 35 School
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

Local authorities have no statutory duties in relation to monitoring the quality of home education on a routine basis. However, they do have duties to make arrangements to identify children not receiving a suitable education, and to intervene if it appears that they are not. Intervention could, for example, take the form of issuing a school attendance order, although Government guidance on home education encourages authorities to address the issue informally before serving such a notice. As part of their safeguarding duties local authorities have powers to insist on seeing a child to enquire about their welfare where there are grounds for concern, but this does not extend to seeing and questioning children for the purpose of establishing whether they are receiving a suitable education.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

We will establish new institutes of technology, backed by leading employers and linked to leading universities, in every major city in England. They will provide courses at degree level and above, specialising in technical disciplines, such as STEM, whilst also providing higher-level apprenticeships and bespoke courses for employers. They will enjoy the freedoms that make our universities great, including eligibility for public funding for productivity and skills research, and access to loans and grants for their students. They will be able to gain royal charter status and regius professorships in technical education. Above all, they will become anchor institutions for local, regional and national industry, providing sought-after skills to support the economy, and developing their own local identity to make sure they can meet the skills needs of local employers. 74
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

A further teacher supply analysis, intended to build on some of the areas covered previously, was published in February 2018. The first two sections of the report looked at post-ITT employment rates and the mobility of NQTs. The analysis found that post-ITT employment rates rose in the six years up to 2014-15, at which point 85% of trainees achieving QTS secured a teaching role within a state-funded school. Employment rates amongst graduates of school-led training routes were typically 5 percentage points higher than those on HEI- based routes. There were also significant variations by secondary subject. Regarding the mobility of NQTs, the analysis found that NQTs do not tend to move far to take up their first post, with around half taking up a post within 25km of their ITT provider.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

There are also a number of specialist competitive scholarships available to recruits in certain shortage subjects. Scholarships are jointly awarded by the Government and professional bodies, and selection is through an additional application and assessment process. Each scholarship also comes with a package of non-financial benefits, such as early career support and membership of the appropriate professional body. 48 A table on the Get Into Teaching Website provides an overview of bursary and scholarship levels for the 2018-19 academic year. The level of bursary ranges from £26,000 for physics trainees with a 2:2 class degree or higher, to £4,000 for history trainees with a 2:1 or Master’s degree. Scholarships of £28,000 are also available in physics, chemistry, languages, computing, and geography. Scholarships of £22,000 are available in maths, in addition to the early career payments. 49
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

In a Westminster Hall debate on school transport in June 2015, the Schools Minister Nick Gibb expanded on the Government position: We believe that [local authorities] are best placed to determine how resources should be used in the areas that they serve and to balance the demands of a broad range of discretionary travel against their budget priorities. If we were to remove this discretion from local authorities’ responsibilities, it would hugely increase the number of eligible children at a substantial cost to the taxpayer. Therefore, it is much more practical and helpful to allow local authorities to continue to make these important decisions locally, but they still need to make the right decisions locally. 14
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

We will establish new institutes of technology, backed by leading employers and linked to leading universities, in every major city in England. They will provide courses at degree level and above, specialising in technical disciplines, such as STEM, whilst also providing higher-level apprenticeships and bespoke courses for employers. They will enjoy the freedoms that make our universities great, including eligibility for public funding for productivity and skills research, and access to loans and grants for their students. They will be able to gain royal charter status and regius professorships in technical education. Above all, they will become anchor institutions for local, regional and national industry, providing sought-after skills to support the economy,
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

The reasoning behind this is that people in full-time education, including those with caring responsibilities, are already supported through the educational maintenance system, via its range of loans and grants. 55 The rule has however been criticised as a barrier to carers wishing to expand their skills with a view to entering or returning to the labour market. In 2008 the House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee said that carers faced a “stark choice between engaging in education and training without any financial support or living on benefits”, and recommended that the Government consider lifting the 21 hour rule and reducing education and training fees for Carer’s Allowance recipients. 56 In its response, the Labour Government said that rather than make piecemeal changes to Carer’s Allowance, it intended to look specifically at the support offered to carers through the benefits system as part of its wider plans to develop a single benefit for people of working age. 57 No detailed plans were set out before the 2010 General Election; and subsequent administrations have not
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

It would neither be practical or desirable to artificially curb the sale of school playing fields, when such disposals may represent the most effective use of public assets. Often changes are made to education provision, such as school closures or mergers, which mean it is no longer necessary to retain playing fields for school use. In such cases it is only right that local communities are able to benefit from space that otherwise would not be used. Converting surplus or unwanted assets to invest in school grounds has benefits that extend far beyond the school gates. No operating school has disposed of its entire playing field.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

After emphasising the importance of the reforms to technical education, including the additional funding to implement them, the Minster then addressed the funding of the sector in general. She stated: The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

following devolution (2019-20 and 2020-21), certain providers delivering residential provision will, however, continue to be funded nationally by the ESFA. 36 The Government has issued illustrative AEB allocations for 2018-19 to MCAs and the GLA in order to provide an indication of the AEB that these areas can expect to receive in 2019-20. It is expected that the final AEB to be delegated in 2018-19 will be confirmed in early 2019. 37 Funding has also been provided by the Government to MCAs and the GLA in 2017-18 to “support preparation for devolution of the adult education budget.” A total of £914.5 million will be paid to the seven authorities in 2017-18. 38
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

After emphasising the importance of the reforms to technical education, including the additional funding to implement them, the Minster then addressed the funding of the sector in general. She stated: The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

consistent across the OECD. These gaps in outcomes generally increase with every additional stage of education studied. It is important to realise that these associations are not necessarily causal. For instance, better levels of reported health are not necessarily due to going to higher education, even in part. There could be other factors which are linked separately to both indicators. This is particularly the case with such social outcomes which will always have multiple contributory factors. If there are causal associations then these could potentially be linked to ‘cultural’ benefits attending university as well as improved employment/ earnings. The direction of cause and effect could also work in the other direction with, for instance, lower levels of higher education participation among those with pre-existing health problems
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP08198, 10 January 2018: Advertising to children

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP08198, 10 January 2018: Advertising to children

5.1 Children sexual imagery The CAP Code does not prevent marketers from using images of children but they should do so in a socially responsible manner. On 2 January 2018, rules 4.8 and 4.13 were added to the CAP and BCAP Codes respectively. These rules state that advertisements should not portray or represent anyone who is, or seems to be, under 18 years old in a sexual way. This does not apply to advertisements whose principal function is to promote the welfare of, or to prevent harm to, under 18s, provided any sexual portrayal or representation is not excessive.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

The report included a section written by Sir John Dunford, the National Pupil Premium Champion 2013-2015, setting out what good practice looks like in schools that are closing their progress gap and how that good practice can be spread nationally. This stated that to make the most of the Pupil Premium, schools must “properly assess the barriers to learning faced by their own disadvantaged pupils, identify clear objectives and criteria for success, and follow the evidence on what works provided by the Education Endowment Foundation and the National Foundation for Educational Research, among others.” 41
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

3.1 Staff numbers Academic staff Between 1994/95 and 2002/03 the number of full-time academic staff at UK HEIs increased by 18% and the number of part time staff by almost 120%. The total headcount increased by 28% and there were above average increases in the number of academics working in research only (not teaching) and in the number of professors, and (non senior) researchers. However, full-timers and academics involved in teaching at least part of the time were still in the majority in 2002/03. More detail is given in Table 4 at the end of this note. The headcount number can obscure some trends in the balance between full- and part-time staff, but it was all that was published at the time. The increase in academic staff headcount over this period was slightly higher than the increase in full-time equivalent student numbers, 29 but much of the growth in staff numbers was in part-timers.
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