Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7966, 13 June 2017: Part-time undergraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7966, 18 January 2019: Part-time undergraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7966, 18 January 2019: Part-time undergraduate students in England

“I welcome the Government’s introduction of maintenance loans for part-time students in today’s Budget. With part-time students more likely to be from under-represented groups, this is an important step in making higher education more accessible, and I hope it will help reverse the troubling decline in part-time student numbers we have seen in recent years [note 1]. I also encourage universities and colleges to continue to think about how they can attract and support part-time learners, for example through

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

While we endorse the approaches and methods outlined in the behaviour management report and strongly expect ITT providers to take account of these recommendations, the Government does not wish to make them mandatory. The behaviour management content developed by this group is, of course, an integral part of the framework of core content for ITT. It should be noted that, given our intention to use the new framework of content as one of the quality criteria that will be used to determine future allocation of training places, providers will need to demonstrate that their programmes conform to the behaviour management content that is included in the wider framework. We recognise that there is rarely one standard delivery method that will work in every classroom, and it would be wrong for Government to try to impose a “one size fits all” approach to behaviour management. Rather, all ITT providers should consider what is being suggested in the report and decide how the approaches outlined can best be incorporated into their programmes. 49
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

In 2016 the Government announced that the funding of healthcare students would be reformed. Following a consultation, from 1 August 2017 NHS Bursaries for students starting courses in nursing, midwifery and other allied health professions (AHP) were abolished and these students became funded in the same way as all other full-time undergraduate students. The changes were brought in under the Education (Student Fees, Awards and Support) (Amendment) Regulations 2017 SI 114.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

...We want to give students a better experience of post-16 study, ensuring they are studying for rigorous qualifications that will provide them with the right skills and knowledge to allow them to progress. Students currently start A-levels in September and then they immediately start preparing for examinations in January. They and their teachers have spent too much time thinking about exams and re-sitting them, encouraging in some cases a “learn and forget” approach. A student taking A-level maths would need to sit six exams: three papers for their AS-level, and three for their A2. The old rules allowed multiple re-sitting of those papers, so a student might sit some papers in January, and if they wanted to improve their grades they could re-sit them in June and again the following year, while sitting and then re-sitting their A2 papers. In 2010, 74% of maths A-level students re-sat at least one paper.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration. As I said at the beginning of my remarks, my job will be to be a champion for the sector. Pre-16 school education is crucial in the success of students post-16, which is why pre-16 schooling must be a funding priority, but it does not end there. 67
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

‘protected characteristics’ such as age, sex, disability and ethnicity. The Spending Review and Autumn Statement 2015 made some headline announcements about funding paid through the funding council, the extension of maintenance loans to part-time students and new loans for Master’s degrees. It also announced that the discount rate applied to loans would be reduced to 0.7% and set the spending totals for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills which will eventually feedthrough to annual funding allocations for higher education.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

It is this Government’s policy that all good and outstanding schools should be able to expand to offer excellent places to local students. The Weald of Kent Grammar School is one of the top performing schools in the country, with 99% of its students achieving five A*-C grades in GCSE exams in 2014, and 98% of sixth form students achieving at least 3 A-Levels at grades A*-E. The Weald of Kent Grammar School submitted a proposal for expansion in 2013. At that stage the then Secretary of State could not approve the proposal as an expansion because the proposal at that time was for a mixed sex annexe when the existing school was single sex. The school submitted a revised proposal in September 2015 under which girls will be educated on both sites alongside a mixed sex sixth form. I am satisfied that this proposal represents a genuine expansion of the existing school, and that there will be integration between the two sites in terms of leadership, management, governance, admissions and curriculum. I am also satisfied that the excellent quality of learning currently delivered will be replicated across the newly expanded school. I welcome the fact that the newly expanded school will better meet the needs of parents in the local area, with 41% of existing pupils at the Weald of Kent Grammar School already travelling from the Sevenoaks area.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

...We want to give students a better experience of post-16 study, ensuring they are studying for rigorous qualifications that will provide them with the right skills and knowledge to allow them to progress. Students currently start A-levels in September and then they immediately start preparing for examinations in January. They and their teachers have spent too much time thinking about exams and re-sitting them, encouraging in some cases a “learn and forget” approach. A student taking A-level maths would need to sit six exams: three papers for their AS-level, and three for their A2. The old rules allowed multiple re-sitting of those papers, so a student might sit some papers in January, and if they wanted to improve their grades they could re-sit them in June and again the following year, while sitting and then re-sitting their A2 papers. In 2010, 74% of maths A-level students re-sat at least one paper.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

Chapter 5 of the Code of Practice to the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) provides detailed guidance for health and social care staff on taking “Best Interests” decisions, where someone lacks capacity. In particular, health and social care staff have a duty under section 4(7) of the MCA to take into account the views of anyone involved in caring for the person and anyone interested in their welfare (for example family carers and other close relatives) as part of a best interests decision. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends that carers are involved in decisions about patient’s hospital discharge plans, if the patient and their carers agree. 108
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

In April 2018, the Education Policy institute published an analysis of the pressures on the teacher labour market. The analysis outlined the challenges in teacher recruitment, including growing pupil numbers and the Government’s ambition for 90% of pupils to be entered for the EBacc by 2025, before noting “worrying signs” on exit rates and on entrants. The problems look worse in secondary schools, it said. Examining the impact on schools, the analysis argued that in some subjects schools have been relying on staff with lower qualifications. While the proportion of teachers with a relevant degree has increased over time in most subjects, the report noted that the two subjects where there has been a decline – physics and geography – were both EBacc subjects and where recruitment targets had been missed.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

Universal Credit, which will see five benefits combined into one, means the end of the current basis for determining free school meals and therefore Pupil Premium eligibility. The Department does not yet know how it will identify disadvantaged pupils following Universal Credit’s introduction, and there is relatively little time to find an answer. There has also been substantial variation in the level of under-claiming between local authorities. In 2013, in some areas more than 30% of eligible pupils did not take up their free school meals entitlement compared to 0% in other areas. The Department told us that it wanted to target local
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

This briefing provides an overview of the new system, the transitional arrangements, and how the new system differs from that which preceded it. It also includes a brief history of the movement towards reform that took place in the years preceding the 2014 Act. A consultation on the inspection by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission of local arrangements to support children and young people with SEN, due to begin in May 2016, was carried out from October 2015 to January 2016. Ofsted and the CQC published a response in March 2016, which confirmed that inspections would begin formally in May. Some initial research has begun to appear on the operation of the reformed system, and an overview of this is provided in the last section.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7946, 11 April 2017: Millennials

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7946, 11 April 2017: Millennials

Therefore we can look at what has happened for earnings for a particular cohort over time. Analysis by the Resolution Foundation (an economic think tank) shows that the millennial age group departs from the usual pattern of younger cohorts earning more in real terms than older cohorts did at the same age (which arises because in ‘normal’ times growth in earnings exceeds inflation), as can be seen in the chart below. 21

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

More recently, in its April 2017 report, Whither Teacher Education and Training?, the Higher Education Policy Institute questioned the use of bursaries as an effective way of boosting recruitment and noted a suspicion that some trainees may be attracted by the bursary but do not intend to teach or stay in the profession for more than a couple of years. The report recommended the replacement of bursaries with a system of ‘forgivable fees’. Such a policy would, it said, “reward teaching and retention in the profession, not training” and would mean that teachers could be free of tuition fee debt by the age of 30. 47
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

highest proportion of pupils attending faith schools in 2017 at 42% and 36% respectively. Outer London (20%) had the lowest. At secondary level the North West (31%) and inner London (26%) and had the highest proportion of faith schools and the East of England (12%) and the South West (13%) had the lowest. At a local authority level more than 55% of primary pupils in Rutland, Wigan, Wiltshire, Blackburn, Knowsley and Dorset attended a faith school. In Leicester, Southend, Newham, Waltham Forest, Thurrock, Luton and Nottingham 10-11% did so. The smaller number of secondary schools means that patterns tend to be more extreme. More than half of secondary pupils attended faith schools in Westminster, Kensington and Chelsea, Liverpool, Bolton and Hammersmith and Fulham. There were six authorities that had no religious secondary schools in 2017. 21
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08543: 28 June 2019: Children's social care services in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08543: 28 June 2019: Children's social care services in England

The work shows, therefore, that spend on children has in fact been overall broadly resilient over the last 20 years, even taking into account the effects of the 2008 recession. Within that overall figure, however, are some worrying trends. Mainstream and acute services such as age 4-16 education and provision for children in care have been protected at the expense of targeted preventative services, removing vital safety nets for some very vulnerable children. The 60% cut in Sure Start and youth services will see an increasing number of vulnerable children fall through the gaps. England now spends nearly half of its entire children’s services budget on 73,000 children in the care system – leaving the other half for the remaining 11.7 million kids.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

No. The new measure is just one piece of information in the achievement and attainment tables. We will continue to publish existing measures, including on the achievement of 5 or more GCSEs at A*-C grade, and we will introduce other measures over time to meet our White Paper commitment to make as much information available to parents and tax payers as possible on the performance of every school. We want the English Baccalaureate to encourage schools to offer the subjects included in it to their pupils but neither we, nor Ofsted, will take action with respect to schools on the basis of their performance against that measure. Is the English Baccalaureate compulsory?
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2017: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2017: English Baccalaureate

demanding considerable curriculum time, is likely to have negative consequences on the uptake of other subjects. We encourage the Government to examine carefully the evidence presented to us, and suggest that it reconsiders the composition of the EBac on conclusion of the National Curriculum Review. More importantly, future performance measures must be well thought through. 69. We are glad that the Department for Education has recognised the potential impact of the EBac on teacher supply, and is working on solutions to any adverse effect this might have. However, academic subjects are not the only path to a successful future, and all young people, regardless of background, must continue to have opportunities to study the subjects in which they are likely to be most successful, and which pupils, parents and schools think will serve them best.
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