Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07250, 8 March 2017: University Technical Colleges

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07250, 8 March 2017: University Technical Colleges

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07250, 8 March 2017: University Technical Colleges

The idea behind UTCs might appear to be offering an alternative but the concept is flawed. Removing pupils from secondary schools at age 14 disrupts their education and steers them towards a particular career too early. And the promised focus on employment in particular jobs might not be adequate. One Black Country UTC student told ITV he had ‘received no practical training’ in engineering – his chosen career. And Ofsted found sixth-form students at the Central Bedfordshire UTC were ‘not following a sufficiently rounded curriculum to support their future choices’ although the ‘excellent resources’ and ‘high quality technical equipment’ enabled students to gain good practical skills. 37
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 June 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 June 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

opportunity” to require schools to ensure non-academic routes received “equal airtime” with academic routes in schools career advice. Schools would be required by law to collaborate with colleges, university technical colleges and other training providers to ensure this was done. An amendment was tabled to the Technical and Further Education Bill in the House of Lords in February 2017 by Lord Baker, to require schools to admit providers of technical education and apprenticeships to contact pupils to promote their courses. The amendment was accepted by the Minister and passed into law shortly prior to the 2017 General Election. The provisions are not yet in force.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

From 2015, the AS-level will be decoupled as a stand-alone, linear qualification and will remain at the same level of challenge as existing AS qualifications. That means that schools and colleges can decide whether to teach the AS-level over one year or two years. If schools and colleges decide to teach the AS in any given subject in one year, that would give them the opportunity, which I think the hon. Member for Scunthorpe (Nic Dakin) was seeking— it is a valid concern—to co-teach the AS and the new A-level together, if that meets the needs of the students and if it is a sensible way for those institutions to ensure that they can deliver education for all young people who want to access both A-levels and the AS.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

The focus that there has been on exams in every one of those final four years of school education can lead to young people failing to deliver and develop that deep understanding of their subject, and to their failing to make connections between topics. Re-sits have also led to too much teaching time being sacrificed for assessment preparation. Research—hon. Members have said that they are keen on it—from Durham university and Cambridge Assessment suggests that repeated opportunities for students to re-sit exams have also risked a form of grade inflation. This is why our reforms to A-levels are so important. Ofqual announced the first stage of the reforms last autumn by removing the January exam window, which will reduce the number of re-sits, as the hon. Member for Feltham and Heston said.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 24 February 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 24 February 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

A significant number of university degree courses now include employability skills and some include compulsory careers sessions. Many institutions also offer extra-curricular schemes to help students to develop the ‘soft skills’ which are valued by employers – some of these schemes lead to awards which students can include in their CVs. Since autumn 2012 universities have had to supply information on destinations and salaries of their recent graduates as part of their Key Information Set – this information allows prospective students to compare institutions by employability rates of graduates. Also the annual survey of Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) collects data on employment of graduates and university league tables use employability rates in their rankings. The availability of data on employability and graduate destinations makes the provision of good careers advice beneficial for both students and universities.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 8 October 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 8 October 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

A significant number of university degree courses now include employability skills and some include compulsory careers sessions. Many institutions also offer extra-curricular schemes to help students to develop the ‘soft skills’ which are valued by employers – some of these schemes lead to awards which students can include in their CVs. Since autumn 2012 universities have had to supply information on destinations and salaries of their recent graduates as part of their Key Information Set – this information allows prospective students to compare institutions by employability rates of graduates. Also the annual survey of Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) collects data on employment of graduates and university league tables use employability rates in their rankings. The availability of data on employability and graduate destinations makes the provision of good careers advice beneficial for both students and universities.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

8.2 In relation to equality legislation, the proposals are that schools should encourage pupils to respect other people, even if they do not agree with them. This does not extend equality requirements or discriminate against Christianity or religious freedoms. The amended standard would not require a school to do anything that they are not currently required to do by the Equality Act 2010 (which applies to independent schools). 8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

We should acknowledge that the curriculum always involves trade-offs: more time on one subject means less time on others. Over the years, I’ve been asked to add scores of subjects - from intellectual property, to Esperanto, to den building - to the national curriculum. Many of these are important and interesting. The question, though, is always whether they are sufficiently important to justify reducing the time available for the existing subjects in the curriculum, and I make no apology for protecting space for the English Baccalaureate subjects wherever possible. That is not to say, of course, that subjects outside the English Baccalaureate have no place in schools. The EBacc is a specific, limited measure consisting of only 5 subject areas and up to 8 GCSEs. Whilst this means that there are several valuable subjects which are not included, it also means that there is time for most pupils to study other subjects in addition to the EBacc, including vocational and technical disciplines which are also vital to future economic growth.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

Performance was higher on average at faith schools across all the other headline performance indicators. However, pupil intake differs between in faith and non-faith schools, both background characteristics (such as free school meal eligibility) and their prior attainment, so headline results may not give us the most meaningful comparisons. The table below summarises a range of 2016 secondary performance data for faith and non-faith schools and gives some background data on intake. Pupils at faith schools were less likely to have low prior attainment when starting secondary school, more likely to have high prior attainment and less likely to be eligible for free school meals or be looked after by their local authority. When the attainment 8 results are broken down by prior attainment bands the faith/non-faith gap falls to a single percentage point in each band. There were similar gaps in the English and maths measure. Progress 8 takes prior attainment into account and while the average at faith schools was higher and statistically significant the absolute difference was small at around one grade higher per subject for one in every fourteen pupils. 25
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 28 March 2017: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 28 March 2017: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

In considering the outcomes of reviews it is important that college governors give careful weight to the long term sustainability of their institution. This will need to take account of their legal duties generally, including under charity law and their legal obligations as charity trustees. The Secretary of State retains powers to intervene in colleges where there are substantial concerns that the institution is being mismanaged or significantly underperforming. We expect institutions to take action, in light of the findings of a review, to ensure that they are resilient and able to respond to future funding priorities. Ultimately we expect the funding agencies, LEPs and national partners only to fund or support institutions that have taken action to ensure they can provide a good quality offer to learners and employers, which is financially sustainable for the long term. 28
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

Single and small academy trusts and sixth form colleges were able to bid for funding through the Condition Improvement Fund, with guidance published by the Education and Skills Funding Agency stating that the HPCF “is intended to improve children’s and young people’s physical and mental health by enhancing access to facilities for physical activity, healthy eating, mental health and wellbeing and medical conditions, such as kitchens, dining facilities, changing rooms, playgrounds and sports facilities.” 33 In March 2018 the Education and Skills Funding

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07914, 29 March 2017: Medical school places in England from September 2018

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07914, 29 March 2017: Medical school places in England from September 2018

The GMC’s National Training Survey 2013 included additional questions on the socioeconomic status of doctors in postgraduate training (i.e. after medical school) who undertook their secondary education and medical degree in the UK. This found that around two-thirds of respondents had parents who were educated to degree level, 34% went to private school, 25% to a state selective school and 8% received free school meals at some point during their time in school. It is difficult to put these figures in any proper context as they look at those

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Measures to legislate for these proposals were included in the Children, Schools and Families Bill before Parliament shortly before the 2010 General Election. For background see Library research paper 09/95 on the Children, Schools and Families Bill, Session 2009-10 (pages 23-27). Many of the Bill’s provisions, including the introduction of compulsory PSHE education and the provision that all children receive at least one year of sex and relationship education were removed during the consideration of Lords Amendments on 8 April 2010 immediately before the dissolution of Parliament for the General Election. The provisions in the Bill that did survive are now contained in the Children, Schools and Families Act 2010.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2017: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2017: English Baccalaureate

We should acknowledge that the curriculum always involves trade-offs: more time on one subject means less time on others. Over the years, I’ve been asked to add scores of subjects - from intellectual property, to Esperanto, to den building - to the national curriculum. Many of these are important and interesting. The question, though, is always whether they are sufficiently important to justify reducing the time available for the existing subjects in the curriculum, and I make no apology for protecting space for the English Baccalaureate subjects wherever possible. That is not to say, of course, that subjects outside the English Baccalaureate have no place in schools. The EBacc is a specific, limited measure consisting of only 5 subject areas and up to 8 GCSEs. Whilst this means that there are several valuable subjects which are not included, it also means that there is time for most pupils to study other subjects in addition to the EBacc, including vocational and technical disciplines which are also vital to future economic growth.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

However, if we truly want a world class system our colleges will need the additional funding to provide world class resources. The plan’s provision for everyone to have work experience alone would cost hundreds of millions of pounds and require much input from employers nationwide to be a success. We therefore welcome the Government's acceptance of the need to review the level of funding for college-based technical education and the Sainsbury Panel's specific suggestion that the intended work placements should receive additional funding. 56

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

However, if we truly want a world class system our colleges will need the additional funding to provide world class resources. The plan’s provision for everyone to have work experience alone would cost hundreds of millions of pounds and require much input from employers nationwide to be a success. We therefore welcome the Government's acceptance of the need to review the level of funding for college-based technical education and the Sainsbury Panel's specific suggestion that the intended work placements should receive additional funding. 52

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1398, 10 March 2017: Grammar School Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1398, 10 March 2017: Grammar School Statistics

attending a grammar school is 2.3 GCSE grades spread over 8 subjects (0.3 grades per subject). Within those highly selective areas, that gain falls to 0.8 of a grade overall, in areas where grammar school places outnumber the proportion of high attaining pupils. In the most selective areas there is a small negative effect of not attending grammar schools – an average of 0.6 grades lower per pupil across all GCSE subjects. But that impact is greater for pupils eligible for free school meals who do not attend grammar schools, they achieve 1.2 grades lower on average across all GCSE subjects.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

Also, through Sport England, we are investing £1 billion over the next five years in the youth sport strategy to encourage everyone, but particularly young people to take up sport and develop a sporting habit for life. This strategy will provide lottery and exchequer funding to: enable the sports’ governing bodies to create more opportunities for everyone to participate in sport at least once a week; help local authorities improve sport provision; support local organisations, well-run clubs, voluntary groups and other partners such as the Dame Kelly Holmes Legacy Trust and Street Games; enhance sport provision at further education colleges and Universities; upgrade community sports facilities and invest in new facilities; enable schools to open up their sporting facilities for use by local communities; rolled out at least 6,000 partnerships between schools and local sports clubs by 2017. School Games
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

6. This chapter sets out our proposals to increase the number of good school places by lifting the restrictions on selection, but at the same time requiring selective schools to play a greater role in raising standards at other schools. In doing so, we do not propose a re-introduction of the binary or tripartite system of the past or a simple expansion of existing selective institutions. We propose that selective schools should be asked to contribute to non- selective schooling in certain ways, ensuring the expansion of good selective education alongside the creation of new good school places in nonselective schools. We believe that these proposals will make grammar schools engines of academic and social achievement for all pupils, whatever their background, wherever they are from and whatever their ability. 40
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

An individual is in absolute low income if their household income is below 60% of the median in some base year, adjusted for inflation. DWP’s Households below average income (HBAI) publication uses 2010/11 as the base year in order to measure absolute low income. This briefing paper follows HBAI and also uses 2010/11 as its base year. The number and percentage of people in absolute low income depends on how you adjust for inflation. The official poverty statistics presented in the HBAI report for 2015/16 use an absolute low income threshold which is uprated based on the Consumer Prices Index (CPI) measure of inflation.
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