Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8389, 5 April 2019: Returns to a degree

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8389, 5 April 2019: Returns to a degree

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8389, 5 April 2019: Returns to a degree

Home region… North East North West Yorkshire & the Humber East Midlands West Midlands East of England London South East South West Scotland, Wales & N.I.. Residence… Living at ho[r]

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

Margaret Hodge: We said in the White Paper, "The Future of Higher Education", that graduates enjoy different returns from different courses and according to the institution attended. Recent research found a 44 percentage point difference in average returns between graduates from institutions at the two extremes of the graduate pay scale. No specific estimates have been made of the distribution of lifetime earnings premia by type of course or institution attended, for either first-degree graduates or post-graduates. However, we will be publishing research evidence later this year on how lifetime earnings premia might differ according to institution attended.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07148, 5 April 2019: The School Day and Year (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07148, 5 April 2019: The School Day and Year (England)

Disclaimer - This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07714, 1 April 2019: The Family Test

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07714, 1 April 2019: The Family Test

While the guidance encourages publication, there is no requirement to do so. 27 Many of the responses to PQs describe briefly what the Family Test is and refer to guidance issued by DWP but provide little additional information. During the March 2019 debate on the Application of the Family Test, several Members expressed frustration at the Departmental responses to their Parliamentary Questions. Fiona Bruce said that the answers were inadequate and did not explain the actions taken by Departments to apply the Family Test. She also contested the argument, made in several Departmental responses, that the Family Test did not apply to the Department’s policy brief. 28
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

A detailed summary of the analysis of the responses was set out in an annex to the response document. 51 In its response the Government stated that it had no wish to alter the basic right of parents to educate their children at home and noted that many who take this approach produce very good results. It added however, that it does not believe that recent growth in the number of home educated children is due to any significant growth in people believing in the virtues of home education in its own right. Rather, it said, the factors are often more negative (e.g. disagreements with the school) and that, while parents may try their best, this does not mean that the education provided is suitable in all cases. It also highlighted the use of unregulated settings which, although sometimes legitimate,
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 8538, 10 April 2019 : The review of university admissions

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 8538, 10 April 2019 : The review of university admissions

Difference in unconditional offers by subject The UCAS End of Cycle Report 2018 showed that the number of unconditional offers made to applicants varied with subjects: The landscape of unconditional offer-making is not uniform across different course types, with patterns varying significantly by the subject applied for. In 2018, 18 per cent of offers made to young people for creative arts and design courses were unconditional, compared to 0.3 per cent for medicine and dentistry courses. This reflects that an audition or portfolio review is normally a core part of the assessment for a creative arts and design course. The demonstration of potential via this form of assessment often carries more weight in reaching an admissions decision than examination results. 8
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 16 April 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 16 April 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

For context, it is worth noting that the total population aged 16-24 has been declining in recent years; it was 22,000 lower than the previous quarter and 89,000 less than a year before. The number of young people in employment increased by 42,000 over the past year. The number who are economically inactive (not in or looking for work) decreased by 101,000.

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

researchers have made a number of attempts. Section 2 of Library Research Paper 13/1, Welfare Benefits Uprating Bill, 2013 , gives an overview of the debate. One such attempt is a major annual research project funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, which estimates Minimum Income Standards (MIS) for different household types in the UK. This involves in-depth consultation with members of the public, combined with expert knowledge, to identify the level of income required to meet a minimum acceptable standard of living: “having what you need in order to have the opportunities and choices necessary to participate in society.” The first findings were published in 2008 and are updated each year. 39 For most household types, the MIS is well above the relative low income threshold. This
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

The reasoning behind this is that people in full-time education, including those with caring responsibilities, are already supported through the educational maintenance system, via its range of loans and grants. 55 The rule has however been criticised as a barrier to carers wishing to expand their skills with a view to entering or returning to the labour market. In 2008 the House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee said that carers faced a “stark choice between engaging in education and training without any financial support or living on benefits”, and recommended that the Government consider lifting the 21 hour rule and reducing education and training fees for Carer’s Allowance recipients. 56 In its response, the Labour Government said that rather than make piecemeal changes to Carer’s Allowance, it intended to look specifically at the support offered to carers through the benefits system as part of its wider plans to develop a single benefit for people of working age. 57 No detailed plans were set out before the 2010 General Election; and subsequent administrations have not
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8386, 17 April 2019: Cost of university courses in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8386, 17 April 2019: Cost of university courses in England

4.1 Value for money The Higher Education Policy Institute’s 2018 Student Academic Experience Survey, stated that from 2012 to 2017 there was a constant decline in the number of students stating that they felt their higher education represented good value for money. In 2018 however the number of students who said that their course was good value for money increased by 3% to 38%. – but there was still a significant proportion of students (32%) who said that their course was poor, or very poor value for money. The survey further showed that students perceptions of value for money varied across institutions and across subjects – with students at Russell Group universities and on medical degrees showing the highest levels of satisfaction.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 08444, 11 April 2019 : Off-rolling in English schools

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 08444, 11 April 2019 : Off-rolling in English schools

Following an earlier call for evidence, on 2 April 2019 the Government published a consultation on proposed legislation concerning children not in school. The consultation closes on 24 June 2019. The response to the call for evidence did not cover off-rolling directly, stating that action on this issue “is being taken forward separately.” 28 The consultation however notes that increasing numbers of children are receiving their principal education outside of mainstream schools. Some of these, it said, are being educated very well at home by parents, but others are receiving “such education as they get…mainly or entirely through attendance at unsuitable settings such as unregistered
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7946, 11 April 2017: Millennials

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7946, 11 April 2017: Millennials

What is more, the cost of defined benefit pensions currently in payment ultimately falls to younger workers, as firms spend money keeping schemes solvent: At the same time, the cost of servicing rapidly increasing DB scheme deficits—exacerbated by low investment returns—is placing an ever greater burden on UK firms. The Office for National Statistics estimates that in 2015 companies made special deficit repair contributions to DB schemes of £11 billion in addition to ordinary employer contributions of £20 billion. This may constrain their ability to increase employment or engage in productive investment. Today’s younger workers are therefore faced with supporting the inadequately-funded DB schemes of their older colleagues and retired predecessors, while being denied the opportunity to accrue pension entitlements on the same basis. Paul Johnson, Director of the IFS, told us that this was tantamount to a “very clear redistribution” between
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

It also asked Ofsted to report back by April 2019 on the inspectorate’s workforce and staff turnover. 4.3 Unregistered schools Independent schools providing a full-time education to five or more children of compulsory school age, or one child with an Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan or who is looked-after, must be registered with the DfE. Operating an unregistered independent school is a criminal offence under Section 159 of the Education Act 2002, as amended. Ofsted has powers to inspect suspected unregistered independent schools.

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8732, 4 November 2019: Level 4 and 5 education

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8732, 4 November 2019: Level 4 and 5 education

Terms of reference The terms of reference for the Review stated that it aimed to ensure joined up system that delivers the technical skills needed by the economy: This review will look further at how we can ensure our post-18 education system is joined up and supported by a funding system that works for students and taxpayers. For example, in recent years the system has encouraged growth in three-year degrees for 18 year- olds, but does not offer a comprehensive range of high quality alternative routes for the many young people who pursue a technical or vocational path at this age. The majority of universities charge the maximum possible fees for at least some of their courses and three- year courses remain the norm. Average levels of graduate debt have increased, but this has not always led to higher wage returns for all graduates. And the system does not comprehensively deliver the advanced technical skills that our economy needs. 64
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7951, 23 April 2019 : T levels : reforms to technical education

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7951, 23 April 2019 : T levels : reforms to technical education

• substantial academic or applied and technical qualifications; • non-qualification activity, such as work experience; and • the study of English and maths where they do not hold a GCSE 9- 4 (reformed grading) or A*-C (legacy grading) in these subjects. 2 Under the 16-19 funding formula introduced in 2013-14, a single basic funding rate per full-time student, currently £4,000 for 16 and 17 year olds, is intended to fund a study programme of around 600 guided learning hours, regardless of where and what the student studies. 3 The formula also provides a number of funding uplifts, including for large programmes and disadvantaged learners, and an area costs adjustment.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 07236, 23 April 2019 : Careers guidance in schools, colleges and
universities

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 07236, 23 April 2019 : Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

But, though we published an inspiration vision statement in September 2013 and strengthened the statutory guidance to support schools and colleges in making this vision a reality, it is clear that many schools and colleges need additional support if we are to ensure every young person—regardless of background or location—receives the life-changing advice and inspiration that they need to fulfil their potential and succeed in life. That is a view supported by a number of respected contributors in this area, including OFSTED, the National Careers Council, the Sutton Trust, the Gatsby Foundation and the Education Committee, as well as many employers, sector experts, and schools and colleges themselves. […]
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

If these findings are put alongside the data in the table at the end of this paper and the earlier chart we can conclude that ‘state school pupils’ improved their representation at Oxford and Cambridge between the end of the 1930s and end of the 1940s; there appears to have been relatively little change in the late 1950s, but further increases in the 1960s and late 1970s which saw state school pupil numbers draw roughly equal with independent schools at the start of the 1980s. State school participation was higher at Oxford, on the measures given here, up to the mid-1960s. However, given there are large gaps this may not necessarily have been the case in each and every year.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

If these findings are put alongside the data in the table at the end of this paper and the earlier chart we can conclude that ‘state school pupils’ improved their representation at Oxford and Cambridge between the end of the 1930s and end of the 1940s; there appears to have been relatively little change in the late 1950s, but further increases in the 1960s and late 1970s which saw state school pupil numbers draw roughly equal with independent schools at the start of the 1980s. State school participation was higher at Oxford, on the measures given here, up to the mid-1960s. However, given there are large gaps this may not necessarily have been the case in each and every year.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

The fourth area that my hon. Friend raised was planning policy. He described the imbalance between the number of sites in some areas compared with others, particularly in his county. The Government’s planning policy for Traveller sites confirms that our aims include that local planning authorities should make their own assessment of need for the purposes of planning and, working together with neighbouring authorities, identify land for sites. Local planning authorities should consider the production of joint development plans that set targets on a cross-authority basis to provide more flexibility in identifying sites. The policy is clear that local planning authorities should ensure that sites in rural areas respect the scale of, and do not dominate, the nearest settled community. In exceptional cases when a local planning authority is burdened by a large-scale unauthorised site that has significantly increased its need, and where the area is subject to strict and special planning constraints, there is no assumption that the authority has to plan to meet its Traveller site needs in full. 83 More recently, in answer to a PQ in April 2019, the junior housing minister, Heather Wheeler, reiterated that “all local planning authorities should identify the need for traveller sites and ensure that appropriate provision is made for the travelling community. 84
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

The fourth area that my hon. Friend raised was planning policy. He described the imbalance between the number of sites in some areas compared with others, particularly in his county. The Government’s planning policy for Traveller sites confirms that our aims include that local planning authorities should make their own assessment of need for the purposes of planning and, working together with neighbouring authorities, identify land for sites. Local planning authorities should consider the production of joint development plans that set targets on a cross-authority basis to provide more flexibility in identifying sites. The policy is clear that local planning authorities should ensure that sites in rural areas respect the scale of, and do not dominate, the nearest settled community. In exceptional cases when a local planning authority is burdened by a large-scale unauthorised site that has significantly increased its need, and where the area is subject to strict and special planning constraints, there is no assumption that the authority has to plan to meet its Traveller site needs in full. 83 More recently, in answer to a PQ in April 2019, the junior housing minister, Heather Wheeler, reiterated that “all local planning authorities should identify the need for traveller sites and ensure that appropriate provision is made for the travelling community. 84
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