Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

The guidance for local authorities sets out the process by which local authorities should identify home educated children and how best they should intervene if a child is not receiving a suitable education. Among other things, it recommends that local authorities should ordinarily make contact with home educating parents on at least an annual basis “so the authority may reasonably inform itself of the current suitability of the education provided.” The guidance states that this will enable local authorities to “fulfil its duty to serve a notice on any parent who does not appear to be providing efficient and suitable education. The guidance also recommends that each local authority should “seek to offer guidance to all known home-educating families in their area and provide advice and support for parents who request it.” 47
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House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

As regards children with statements of SEN which name schools as the appropriate placement for a child but parents decide to educate such a child at home, it remains the local authority’s duty to ensure that the child’s needs are met through the provision made by the parents. The local authority can support parents financially in these circumstances under section 319 or section 19 of the Education Act 1996 (this would fall under either paragraph 18 or paragraph 20 of Schedule 2 to the School and Early Years Finance (England) Regulations 2012). In deciding how much support is needed, the local authority should be aware that, unlike schools, parents do not receive base funding from the public purse in support of SEN, and should not therefore be expected to pay £10,000 before they receive any support.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

Concerns have been raised regarding schools off-rolling pupils by pressurising their parents to educate them at home. For example, in a letter to the Public Accounts Committee in October 2018 the Chief Inspector of Schools, Amanda Spielman, stated that Ofsted had “a lot of anecdotal evidence that suggests that parents are home-educating their children under duress, to prevent exclusion.” She added that, while Ofsted accepts that home education is a legitimate choice and is often done well, often the parents of off-rolled children “do not have the capacity to provide a good standard of education.” 69
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

The premium has enabled schools to enhance both the quality and range of PE teaching and sports provision. As a result of this investment, schools reported a range of positive impacts on pupils including increased pupil engagement and participation in PE and sports as well as impacts on social and inter-personal skills, behaviour, and PE skills and fitness. Schools also perceived positive impacts on the skills and confidence of teachers to deliver PE. The findings of this study have also highlighted challenges for the future of PE and sport in primary schools. To sustain the impact of the premium, schools have used it to invest in training for existing staff. However, a question remains over how to maintain this investment in CPD for new teachers entering the profession, once premium funding ends. Schools also raised issues related to sourcing good quality provision in their local area, and may need further support to robustly assess the quality of the provision available. The survey also found that monitoring and evaluation of the premium was not consistent and schools may require further advice and guidance to support them to first assess impacts and then put in place strategies for continuing quality improvement. 23
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 February 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 February 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

Universal Credit, which will see five benefits combined into one, means the end of the current basis for determining free school meals and therefore Pupil Premium eligibility. The Department does not yet know how it will identify disadvantaged pupils following Universal Credit’s introduction, and there is relatively little time to find an answer. There has also been substantial variation in the level of under-claiming between local authorities. In 2013, in some areas more than 30% of eligible pupils did not take up their free school meals entitlement compared to 0% in other areas. The Department told us that it wanted to target local authorities where under-claiming was high, so that schools do not miss out on funding because parents fail to claim. 23
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

The rates of language teachers without a ‘relevant’ post-A Level qualification in their subject, are higher than the secondary teachers in state schools average (around 34% compared to an average of around 25%). However, this average masks varying rates within the different languages. 23% of French teachers did not have a relevant post-A level qualification in the subject compared to 28% of German, 48% of Spanish, and 53% of other modern language teachers. These high rates are in very large part due to teachers who are native speakers in their subjects but do not hold a formal ‘relevant’ qualification in it.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

The term 16-19 education is used in this briefing to refer to education funded by the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) and its predecessor bodies through the 16-19 funding system. This refers to a broad range of educational provision, including (but not limited to), students aged 16-19 in maintained school and academy sixth forms, sixth form colleges, general further education (FE) colleges, and special schools. It also includes students aged 19 to 25 with Education, Health and Care Plans. It does not include students on apprenticeships or at higher education institutions.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

The overriding challenge for the 16–18 sector concerns the long- run stagnation in the level of resources available. By the end of the current Spending Review period in 2019–20, we expect that spending per student in further education will only be just above the level seen 30 years ago at the end of the 1980s. To date, school sixth forms have probably been better able to manage real- terms cuts in funding given that school funding per pupil was protected in real terms between 2010–11 and 2015–16. This clearly will not be possible indefinitely, especially as school

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since
2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

discretionary learner support) is set to be held constant in cash terms at £1.5 billion up to 2019-20. Funding for apprenticeships and loans is set to increase by 92% and 140% respectively between the 2015-16 baseline and 2019-20. From 2017-18 onwards, apprenticeship funding has, in part, been provided via the apprenticeship levy. The Government has announced a review of post-18 education funding, including further education. The review will be supported by an independent panel, led by Philip Augar, and is expected to conclude in early 2019.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The initial teaching and learning funding allocations for adult further education (FE) and skills in England fell from a 2010- 11 baseline of £3.18 billion to £2.94 billion in 2015-16, a reduction of 8% in cash terms or 14% in real terms. The allocation for 2015-16 fell further as a result of the 2015 Summer Budget, which reduced the non-apprenticeship part of the Adult Skills Budget (ASB) by an additional 3.9%. While funding for community learning and offender learning stayed fairly constant over the period, ASB funding declined by 29% in cash terms between 2010-11 and 2015-16 – this in part connected to the replacement of grant funding with loan funding for some learners from 2013-14 onwards. The minimum annual funding allocated to adult apprenticeships increased by 113% between 2010-11 and 2015-16,
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08117, 7 June 2018: Sexual harassment in education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08117, 7 June 2018: Sexual harassment in education

partnership to prevent and respond to violence against women, harassment and hate crime affecting students. In October 2016 Universities UK published a further document, Guidance For Higher Education Institutions, How To Handle Alleged Student Misconduct Which May Also Constitute A Criminal Offence . This guidance covered the issues of sexual harassment and should be used by HEIs when drafting policies in this area. The guidance reflects the recommendations of the UUK taskforce and updates the previous guidance – the Zellick guidelines 27 which had been in operation since
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

opportunity for a range of education and training providers to access pupils during the relevant phase of their education, for the purpose of informing them about approved technical education qualifications or apprenticeships. Lord Baker, who moved the amendment, stated that this would give all young people the chance to hear directly from providers of apprenticeships and technical qualifications” and would be of particular benefit to University Technical Colleges (UTCs) which recruit learners at 14 years of age. 62

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

More recently, in its April 2017 report, Whither Teacher Education and Training?, the Higher Education Policy Institute questioned the use of bursaries as an effective way of boosting recruitment and noted a suspicion that some trainees may be attracted by the bursary but do not intend to teach or stay in the profession for more than a couple of years. The report recommended the replacement of bursaries with a system of ‘forgivable fees’. Such a policy would, it said, “reward teaching and retention in the profession, not training” and would mean that teachers could be free of tuition fee debt by the age of 30. 43
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

Disclaimer - This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

After consultation the Government decided to freeze the repayment threshold for all post-2012 borrowers. The discount rate used for the public accounting of loans was reduced from 2.2% to 0.7%. These changes were expected to result in savings to current spending when grants are ended, and a substantial cut in the subsidy element of loans. On 1 October 2017 the Prime Minister announced a number of changes to these policies: The fee cap would be frozen in 2018-19, the repayment threshold would rise to £25,000 and a there would be a review of the student finance system. The Department for
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

‘protected characteristics’ such as age, sex, disability and ethnicity. The Spending Review and Autumn Statement 2015 made some headline announcements about funding paid through the funding council, the extension of maintenance loans to part-time students and new loans for Master’s degrees. It also announced that the discount rate applied to loans would be reduced to 0.7% and set the spending totals for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills which will eventually feedthrough to annual funding allocations for higher education.

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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 04195, 7 December 2018 : School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 04195, 7 December 2018 : School meals and nutritional standards (England)

Nutritional standards for school dinners were first established in the 1940s in England but were abolished in 1980. Subsequently, the School Standards and Framework Act 1998 gave the Secretary of State the power to make regulations prescribing nutritional standards and other nutritional requirements for school meals. It also placed a duty on LEAs and the governing bodies of schools maintained by LEAs, when they provide lunches, to provide them for registered pupils in line with the standards. In April 2001, statutory nutritional standards for school lunches were reintroduced by the Education (Nutritional Standards for School Lunches) Regulations 2000 (since superseded).
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 20 April 2018: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 20 April 2018: Special Educational Needs: support in England

give parents a real choice of school, either a mainstream or special school. We will remove the bias towards inclusion and propose to strengthen parental choice by improving the range and diversity of schools from which parents can choose, making sure they are aware of the options available to them and by changing statutory guidance for local authorities. Parents of children with statements of SEN will be able to express a preference for any state-funded school – including special schools, Academies and Free Schools – and have their preference met unless it would not meet the needs of the child, be incompatible with the efficient education of other children, or be an inefficient use of resources. We will also prevent the unnecessary closure of special schools by giving parents and community groups the power to take them over 36
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 November 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 November 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

Nutritional standards for school dinners were first established in the 1940s in England but were abolished in 1980. Subsequently, the School Standards and Framework Act 1998 gave the Secretary of State the power to make regulations prescribing nutritional standards and other nutritional requirements for school meals. It also placed a duty on LEAs and the governing bodies of schools maintained by LEAs, when they provide lunches, to provide them for registered pupils in line with the standards. In April 2001, statutory nutritional standards for school lunches were reintroduced by the Education (Nutritional Standards for School Lunches) Regulations 2000 (since superseded).
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

UCAS breaks down some of its group entry rates by the ‘tariff’ level of different universities. There are three tariff groups; high, medium and low and these refer to average grades of students admitted. High tariff institutions where entrants have higher grades are generally considered more prestigious and harder to get into. This type of analysis therefore can shed light on a different aspect of widening participation. In 2016 only 2.5% of 18 year olds from England who were eligible for FSM at school got into one of these high tariff universities. The rate has increased over time from less than 1.5% in the period 2006 to 2010, but was still well below the 9.5% for the non-FSM group. The size of the relative gap has fallen over time; in 2006 the non-FSM group were almost six time as likely to go to a high tariff university and this fell to below four times as likely in 2016. However, the absolute gap has increased in recent years from six percentage points in 2012 to seven points in 2016.
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