Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

The fourth area that my hon. Friend raised was planning policy. He described the imbalance between the number of sites in some areas compared with others, particularly in his county. The Government’s planning policy for Traveller sites confirms that our aims include that local planning authorities should make their own assessment of need for the purposes of planning and, working together with neighbouring authorities, identify land for sites. Local planning authorities should consider the production of joint development plans that set targets on a cross-authority basis to provide more flexibility in identifying sites. The policy is clear that local planning authorities should ensure that sites in rural areas respect the scale of, and do not dominate, the nearest settled community. In exceptional cases when a local planning authority is burdened by a large-scale unauthorised site that has significantly increased its need, and where the area is subject to strict and special planning constraints, there is no assumption that the authority has to plan to meet its Traveller site needs in full. 83
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

4.3 Transparency and accountability will also be enhanced by the requirement for CCGs that are benefitting from the health inequalities funding adjustment to set out for the first time how they are targeting that funding to improve the equity of access and outcomes. The Long-Term Plan renews our commitment to commissioning, partnering with and championing local charities, social enterprises and community interest companies providing services and support to vulnerable and at-risk groups, including Gypsy, Roma and Travellers, which we recognize as leading innovators in their field and key partners in helping us achieving our ambitions to promote equality and reduce health inequalities. 4.4 In addition, the inclusion group of health charities within the Health and Wellbeing Alliance, which includes Friends Families and Travellers, have identified a small number of common themes which would help improve experience and outcomes for
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

carried forward as wider welfare reforms have been implemented. Work undertaken for the Ministerial Working Group also found that, while in general Gypsies and Travellers did not feel individually discriminated against by Jobcentre Plus, there was a real fear of discrimination and a belief that staff might not always be sensitive to their culture. Internal guidance for DWP staff now includes “easy-to- find information about Gypsy and Traveller issues, including background to the population, history and cultural traditions, as well as links to best practice, and to Gypsy Roma and Traveller organisations”. 124 This
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

More recently, attention has focused on the problem whereby increases in the National Minimum Wage (now the National Living Wage (NLW)) mean that carers working 16 hours a week (in order to qualify for Working Tax Credit) can find themselves earning above the Carer’s Allowance earnings limit – and are forced to choose between giving up their Carer’s Allowance, or reducing their working hours to stay within the earnings limit and losing their WTC. With the NLW expected to reach around £9 an hour by 2020 48 , there are fears that this could

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review)
recommendations

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review) recommendations

For too long, we’ve had a system that works for half the population whilst neglecting the other half. We live in a country with 9 million adults with poor basic skills, even more lacking strong digital literacy, skills gaps widening particularly in intermediate skills, employers struggling to recruit in many roles and enormous demand for tech experts to help reap the benefits of digital transformation. Our education and training system is not delivering to meet these needs now, so changes and fairer investment are vital.

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 8538, 10 April 2019 : The review of university admissions

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 8538, 10 April 2019 : The review of university admissions

The minority of university offers are unconditional, but the share of all offers made that were recorded as unconditional has increased significantly, from 9.2 per cent in 2013, to 15.1 per cent in 2018. Most unconditional offers are made to older students, but the unconditional offer rate for 18 year olds has driven the overall increase in unconditional offers; up from less than 1% of offers to this age group in 2013, to 7.1% in 2018. 23% of 18 year olds received an unconditional offer in 2018, or 34% if all offers with any unconditional component are included. Unconditional offers are more common at universities with lower entry requirements. In 2013 just 16 universities had unconditional offer rates to 18 year olds of 1% or more. In 2018 this number had increased to 84.
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2019: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2019: English Baccalaureate

In October 2012, the Department for Education published a report on The Effects of the English Baccalaureate , carried out by Ipsos MORI; a revised edition of the findings was published in February 2013. The report found that there had been “no significant change” in the proportion of Year 9 pupils who had chosen to take either the EBacc combination of subjects, or each of the individual EBacc subjects, since 2011, and that few schools had made changes in response to the EBacc, with still fewer planning to do so. The report noted that “virtually all schools offer all EBacc subjects,” and that “most schools (89%) say that their option blocks allow pupils who want to study towards the EBacc to do so,” with low pupil attainment being cited as the reason that pupils typically might not be offered the EBacc
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

Alongside the recruitment of new teachers, the retention of existing teachers is a key component in maintaining teacher supply and is a key focus of the DfE’s Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategy. 42,830 FTE qualified teachers left the state-funded sector in the 12 months to November 2017, a ‘wastage rate’ of 9.9%. This rate was the same as the previous two years and has increased from 9.2% in 2011. In 2017 the number of teachers leaving the profession was higher than the number entering for the first time on the current series (which goes back to 2011); 400 more FTE teachers left the profession than joined. The number of FTE qualified teachers recorded as leaving the state funded sector for reasons other than retirement was 35,800 in 2017. This has increased year-on-year from 24,750 in 2011 (when the current series starts). 25
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

When ‘variable’ fees for new students were introduced in 2006 both universities set ‘targets’ for the proportion of pupils they aimed to take from state schools by 2011. These were set out in their access agreements with the Office of Fair Access (Offa). Both rates apply to home applicants/entrants only so are slightly different from the other figures in this note which look at all those attending UK schools and colleges. Oxford’s target was 62% of applicants 8 and Cambridge’s was 60-63% of entrants. 9 In 2011 64% of UK

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

The decline in entrants has been solely due to the fall in ‘other under graduates’. Their numbers fell by more than 220,000 (67%) over the decade while there were increases in those on first degree courses of around 100,000 (21%), postgraduate research of around 7,000 (25%) and postgraduate taught programmes of 70,000 (29%). Other undergraduate courses are generally taken part-time and students on these courses make up a large proportion of total part-time numbers. This means that total part-time entrants have fallen steeply as well from 470,000 in 2009/10 to below 240,000 in 2017/18; a drop of 49% compared to an increase of 9% in full-time numbers. There were falls in each type of part-time course over this period; 70% in part-time ‘other’ undergraduates, 33% in first degrees (despite an increase in 2017/18), 17% taught postgraduate and 15% postgraduate research courses. Most of the decline in part- time postgraduate taught courses was to 2012/13 and numbers have stabilised or increased slightly since then.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

The Government gradually introduced new arrangements for students starting in autumn 1998 (academic year 1998/99). In the first year new entrants received support through loans and grants. The maximum maintenance grant available was £1,000 less than that for existing students. This was compensated for by a matching increase in loan entitlement. Most new entrants were also expected make an income-assessed contribution of up to £1,000 a year to the cost of their tuition. From 1999 new entrants and those who started in 1998 received all maintenance support as loans which were partly income-assessed. A different repayment system operates for loans for new students from 1998. These are income contingent repayments where graduates repay 9% of gross income annual above £10,000. 59 This threshold was raised to £15,000 in
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

In the first half of the period there was a clear increase in the proportion of state school pupils entering Oxford. This increased from 43% in the early 1970s to 52% in 1981. The level at Cambridge was more erratic, varying between 45% and 50% for most of this period. The rate at both institutions fell noticeably in the mid-1980s. New definitions were brought in from 1986/87 and trends since then have been more stable. Cambridge overtook Oxford in 1988 and took a higher percentage of state school pupils in each subsequent year other than 2011. There was little change at either institution during the early/mid-1990s. Rates at both increased to more than 50% in the late 1990s and early part of this century. This increase has generally been sustained in recent years and both institutions saw record highs in 2017; 60.5% at Cambridge and 56.1% at Oxford. The absolute number of state school entrants peaked in 2002 at Oxford and 2008 at Cambridge. Increases in the number of ‘overseas and other’ entrants meant highs in maintained school percentages between 2010 and 2012 were not matched by highs in absolute numbers. To put these figures in context Independent school leavers made up 9.7% of young (<20) accepted home applicants to higher education via the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) in 2017. 23
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 16 April 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 16 April 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

299,000 men aged 16-24 were unemployed in December 2018 to February 2019, a small increase on a year ago. The unemployment rate for men of this age was 13.1%, up slightly from 12.9% a year before. 194,000 women aged 16-24 were unemployed, down 40,000 from a year before. The unemployment rate for women aged 16-24 was 9.3%, compared to 11.1% a year before.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

Working-age non-parents were the only major demographic group not to see a fall in relative poverty between 2007–08 and 2012–13 (although there was a fall when looking just at the change between 2011–12 and 2012–13; however, this was not significant). This is a group who are, on average, more reliant on earnings and less reliant on benefits than children and pensioners, even when focusing only on low income groups. In 2012–13, benefits made up 88% of household income for the poorest 30% of pensioners, 62% for the poorest 30% of children and 38% for the poorest 30% of working-age non-parents. This helps to explain why they benefited less from the rise in benefits relative to earnings during the recession. In addition, working-age adults without dependent children are relatively likely to be young adults, and […] adults aged under 30 saw the largest falls in wages and employment rates during the recession. 9
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07819: 27 June 2019: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07819: 27 June 2019: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07585, 8 August 2019 : The Troubled Families Programme (England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07585, 8 August 2019 : The Troubled Families Programme (England)

An impact evaluation, supported by a Technical Advisory Group, is assessing the impact of the Programme in phase two. An independent qualitative study is also being undertaken by Ipsos MORI. Section three of this paper outlines the most recent findings published in March 2019; Annex A lists the other reports that have been published for phase two. Qualitative data from staff involved in the Programme suggests that the second phase has been effective in initiating change at a local level. According to feedback, participant families see the benefit of the initiative.

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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

After consultation the Government decided to freeze the repayment threshold for all post-2012 borrowers. The discount rate used for the public accounting of loans was reduced from 2.2% to 0.7%. These changes were expected to result in savings to current spending when grants are ended, and a substantial cut in the subsidy element of loans. On 1 October 2017 the Prime Minister announced a number of changes to these policies: The fee cap would be frozen in 2018-19, the repayment threshold would rise to £25,000 and a there would be a review of the student finance system. The Department for
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

An individual is in absolute low income if their household income is below 60% of the median in some base year, adjusted for inflation. DWP’s Households below average income (HBAI) publication uses 2010/11 as the base year in order to measure absolute low income. This briefing paper follows HBAI and also uses 2010/11 as its base year. The number and percentage of people in absolute low income depends on how you adjust for inflation. The official poverty statistics presented in the HBAI report for 2015/16 use an absolute low income threshold which is uprated based on the Consumer Prices Index (CPI) measure of inflation.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

leadership, governance, administration arrangements and admissions policies across the school. The school intends to bring all year sevens together for at least half a day a week, and that will extend to all five-year groups as the extended site fills up. There will be a range of cross-site curricular activities, including in personal, social, health and economic education, languages and music, reflecting the integrated split-site school. In addition, the school will continue to operate a house system that will apply to students regardless of their site location, and this will further secure regular, cross-site learning. New staff contracts will make it clear that staff are expected to work on both sites.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

• Education, Health and Care Plans - for children and young people aged up to 25 who need more support than is available through SEN support. They aim to provide more substantial help for children and young people through a unified approach that reaches across education, health care, and social care needs. The Library briefing Special Educational Needs: support in England, SN 07020, provides more detailed information on the system that is in place.

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