Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8089, 19 January 2018: Student loan interest rates FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8089, 19 January 2018: Student loan interest rates FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8089, 19 January 2018: Student loan interest rates FAQs

This is regardless of whether they make any repayments or not. Their repayments depend on their income and the repayment threshold alone, not interest rates. The charts below look at repayments by income decile of graduates 12 under different maximum interest rates. 13 The first chart gives lifetime repayments in present value (discounted) terms and the one below the change compared to the current maximum. Where the change is positive this group would repay more and where it is negative they repay less or benefit from the change. These charts illustrate the point made earlier that it is higher earning graduates, particularly those in the top three deciles, who would benefit from a cut in the maximum interest rate.
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House of Commmons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8089, 19 January 2018: Student loan interest rates FAQs

House of Commmons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8089, 19 January 2018: Student loan interest rates FAQs

This is regardless of whether they make any repayments or not. Their repayments depend on their income and the repayment threshold alone, not interest rates. The charts below look at repayments by income decile of graduates 12 under different maximum interest rates. 13 The first chart gives lifetime repayments in present value (discounted) terms and the one below the change compared to the current maximum. Where the change is positive this group would repay more and where it is negative they repay less or benefit from the change. These charts illustrate the point made earlier that it is higher earning graduates, particularly those in the top three deciles, who would benefit from a cut in the maximum interest rate.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 18 June 2018: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 18 June 2018: Student Loan Statistics

The Government gradually introduced new arrangements for students starting in autumn 1998 (academic year 1998/99). In the first year new entrants received support through loans and grants. The maximum maintenance grant available was £1,000 less than that for existing students. This was compensated for by a matching increase in loan entitlement. Most new entrants were also expected make an income-assessed contribution of up to £1,000 a year to the cost of their tuition. From 1999 new entrants and those who started in 1998 received all maintenance support as loans which were partly income-assessed. A different repayment system operates for loans for new students from 1998. These are income contingent repayments where graduates repay 9% of gross income annual above £10,000. 6 This threshold was raised to £15,000 in April 2000. The last Government planned to receive this level in 2010, but did not alter its level. The Coalition Government announced that the repayment thresholds for students with income contingent loans who started higher education before 2012/13 will be increased in line with inflation until 2016. 7
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The analysis found that rates of teachers leaving the profession are particularly high for early career teachers in science, maths and languages. It stated that this, together with difficulties in recruiting new trainees in these subjects, makes it increasingly hard for schools to find suitable staff and may make it difficult for the Government to achieve its aim to increase the proportion of pupils entered for the EBacc. The report suggested that one factor behind the high wastage rate could be that teacher pay in these subjects is below what science and maths graduates could earn elsewhere.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

of primaries and 16% of secondaries in January 2000. The number of state funded faith schools in England broken down by level and religion is given in the table at the end of this section. Church of England schools were the most common type among primary schools (26% of all primaries); Roman Catholic schools the most numerous type of faith school at secondary level (9%). Non-Christian schools were very much in the minority; there were 48 Jewish, 27 Muslim, 11 Sikh and 5 Hindu schools at the start of January 2017. While the number of Christian schools has fallen slightly since 2007 the number of non- Christian schools has increased. Between January 2007 and September 2017 the number of Jewish schools increased by 11, Muslim schools by 20, Sikh schools by 9 and all the Hindu schools have opened since 2008. 19
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

The maximum maintenance grant available was £1,000 less than that for existing students. This was compensated for by a matching increase in loan entitlement. Most new entrants were also expected make an income-assessed contribution of up to £1,000 a year to the cost of their tuition. From 1999 new entrants and those who started in 1998 received all maintenance support as loans which were partly income-assessed. A different repayment system operates for loans for new students from 1998. These are income contingent repayments where graduates repay 9% of gross income annual above £10,000. 59 This threshold was raised to £15,000 in April 2005. The last Government planned to receive this level in 2010, but did not alter its level. The Coalition Government announced that the repayment thresholds for students with income contingent loans who started higher education before 2012/13 would be increased in line with inflation until 2016. 60 Further changes in the student finance system were introduced in 2006/07 when new students attending institutions in England and Northern Ireland could be charged variable fees of up to £3,000.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 2 December 2016: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 1079, 2 December 2016: Student Loan Statistics

Professor Nicholas Barr has argued for some time that the interest rate subsidy is both inefficient and unfair. The operation of income contingent loans means that graduates with low income in any one year are ‘protected’ from high repayments because they only repay 9% of their income over £15,000 per year. These are normally graduates at the start of their career. Where graduates have a low income for their entire career –either through low annual earnings or periods out of the labour market- they make little or no repayments. Their ‘protection’ comes from the 25 year write off. If they make any repayments they are small and unlikely to cover more than interest payments, so it does not matter what the interest rate is. It is their income that determines repayments, not the interest rate. The interest rate is completely irrelevant for the lowest paid graduates. It could be set at commercial levels, zero, or even a negative rate. It would have no impact on the amount they repay. The interest rate affects the duration of repayments for those who do repay. If it were higher then it would take longer to repay and total repayments would increase. By definition it is the higher paid graduates who benefit from this shorter repayment period and lower total repayments.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

• substantial academic or applied and technical qualifications; • non-qualification activity, such as work experience; and • the study of English and maths where they do not hold a GCSE 9- 4 (reformed grading) or A*-C (legacy grading) in these subjects. 2 Under the 16-19 funding formula introduced in 2013-14, a single basic funding rate per full-time student, currently £4,000 for 16 and 17 year olds, is intended to fund a study programme of around 600 guided learning hours, regardless of where and what the student studies. 3 The formula also provides a number of funding uplifts, including for large programmes and disadvantaged learners, and an area costs adjustment.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

There are also now a limited number of undergraduate degrees that allow the student to incorporate teacher training partway through the degree course, after an experience of classroom teaching. Successful students graduate with both a degree in their chosen subject and a recommendation for QTS. The length of the degree course is unaffected as the school placements are incorporated within the original course length. Degrees with QTS opt-in all focus on secondary school teaching and BA, BSc and Integrated Masters courses are available. A list of universities offering these courses is available on the Get Into Teaching website.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

substantial in 2017 and the overall MEM gaps increased in absolute and relative terms in 2016 and 2017. UCAS breaks down some of its group entry rates by the ‘tariff’ level of different universities. There are three tariff groups; high, medium and low and these refer to average grades of students admitted. High tariff institutions where entrants have higher grades are generally considered more prestigious and harder to get into. This type of analysis therefore can shed light on a different aspect of widening participation. In 2016 only 2.5% of 18 year olds from England who were eligible for FSM at school got into one of these high tariff universities. The rate has increased over time from less than 1.5% in the period 2006 to 2010, but was still well below the 9.5% for the non-FSM group. The size of the relative gap has fallen over time; in 2006 the non-FSM group were almost six time as likely to go to a high tariff university and this fell to below four times as likely in 2016. However, the absolute gap has increased in recent years from six percentage points in 2012 to seven points in 2016.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 January 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 January 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

Many institutions also offer extra-curricular schemes to help students to develop the ‘soft skills’ which are valued by employers – some of these schemes lead to awards which students can include in their CVs. Since autumn 2012 universities have had to supply information on destinations and salaries of their recent graduates as part of their Key Information Set – this information allows prospective students to compare institutions by employability rates of graduates. Also the annual survey of Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) collects data on employment of graduates and university league tables use employability rates in their rankings. The availability of data on employability and graduate destinations makes the provision of good careers advice beneficial for both students and universities.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

at UK schools and colleges, particularly at independent schools. In the first half of the period there was a clear increase in the proportion of state school pupils entering Oxford. This increased from 43% in the early 1970s to 52% in 1981. The level at Cambridge was more erratic, varying between 45% and 50% for most of this period. The rate at both institutions fell noticeably in the mid-1980s. New definitions were brought in from 1986/87 and trends since then have been more stable. Cambridge overtook Oxford in 1988 and took a higher percentage of state school pupils in each subsequent year other than 2011. There was little change at either institution during the early/mid-1990s. Rates at both increased to more than 50% in the late 1990s and early part of this century. This increase has generally been sustained in recent years and both institutions saw record highs in 2017; 60.5% at Cambridge and 56.1% at Oxford.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 6 January 2017: English Baccalaureate

Westminster Academy. 3 Further details were set out in the schools white paper, The Importance of Teaching, published in November 2010: 4.21 In most European countries school students are expected to pursue a broad and rounded range of academic subjects until the age of 16. Even in those countries such as the Netherlands where students divide between academic and vocational routes all young people are expected, whatever their ultimate destiny, to study a wide range of traditional subjects. So we will introduce a new award – the English Baccalaureate – for any student who secures good GCSE or iGCSE passes in English, mathematics, the sciences, a modern or ancient foreign language and a humanity such as history or geography. This combination of GCSEs at grades A*-C will entitle the student to a certificate recording their
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

• DCLG guidance, Plain English guide to planning for free schools, published January 2015 . 21 Securing a site can be a challenging aspect of establishing a free school, especially in densely-populated urban areas with high land values and few vacant public buildings. In March 2017 the DfE launched LocatED, a property acquisitions company for free school sites. A press release explained LocatED’s aims:

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: CBP 8097, 3 January 2018: Prime Minister’s announcement on changes to student funding

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: CBP 8097, 3 January 2018: Prime Minister’s announcement on changes to student funding

transaction’ rather than spending on services. It would increase the size of the national debt in the future as cash repayments would fall. Borrowers Raising the threshold and removing the freeze means that borrowers making repayments will see their monthly repayments fall. Some will fall below the new higher threshold and hence make no repayments until they start earning above the new level. All borrowers who earn between the upper and lower thresholds would also face a lower interest rate as these levels determine the sliding scale of rates. For instance a borrower earning £31,000 (in 2018-19) would originally have faced an interest rate of 4.6% (RPI +1.5%), but the higher thresholds cut this to 4.0%
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7049, 27 February 2018: Postgraduate loans in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7049, 27 February 2018: Postgraduate loans in England

1.101 From 2018-19, loans of up to £25,000 will be available to any English student without a Research Council living allowance who can win a place for doctoral study at a UK university. They will be added to any outstanding master’s loan and repaid on the same terms, but with the intention of setting a repayment rate of 9% for doctoral loans and a combined 9% repayment rate if people take out a doctoral and master’s loan. The government will launch a technical consultation on the detail. Those who take out only a master’s loan will still repay at 6%, as announced at Autumn Statement 2015. 40
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08117, 7 June 2018: Sexual harassment in education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08117, 7 June 2018: Sexual harassment in education

Sexual harassment and the ‘lads’ culture’ The NUS and many providers have taken a close interest, both in the UK and overseas, in sexual harassment on campus. Student and national media carry frequent stories about what is euphemistically termed ‘laddish’ behaviour, often from sports clubs and other student societies. There are disturbing reports of what one student newspaper called the ‘rape culture’. One student committed suicide in 2014, following allegations of persistent sexual harassment.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7976, 21 February 2018: International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7976, 21 February 2018: International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

Students beginning study in the 2017/18 and 2018/19 Academic Years As for students studying in the 16/17 Academic Year, the eligibility rules regarding student support and home fee status applying to EU nationals, or their family members, who wish to enter the UK to study a course in England which starts in either the 2017/18 or the 2018/19 Academic Year and which attracts student support, are also unchanged. SFE will assess these applications against existing eligibility criteria, and will provide loans and/or grants in the normal way. EU nationals, or their family members, who are assessed as eligible to receive grants and/or loans by SFE will then be eligible for this support and for home fee status for the duration of their course. These eligibility criteria set out that for students beginning study any time after August 2016, EU nationals must have been resident in the UK for at least five years or be EEA migrant workers in order to apply for a maintenance loan.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049, 29 January 2019: Postgraduate loans in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049, 29 January 2019: Postgraduate loans in England

1.154 Autumn Statement 2014 therefore introduces a new offer of income contingent loans for those under 30 years old wishing to undertake a postgraduate taught masters in any subject. These loans, of up to £10,000, are planned to be available from 2016- 17 and will be repaid concurrently with undergraduate loans. The loans are designed so that, on average, individuals will repay in full, in recognition of the high private return to individuals, but they will beat commercial rates. The government will consult on the detail and will confirm the delivery plan. This is expected to benefit around 40,000 students, and enable around 10,000 more individuals to take advantage of the opportunity to undertake postgraduate study each year.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

Margaret Hodge: We said in the White Paper, "The Future of Higher Education", that graduates enjoy different returns from different courses and according to the institution attended. Recent research found a 44 percentage point difference in average returns between graduates from institutions at the two extremes of the graduate pay scale. No specific estimates have been made of the distribution of lifetime earnings premia by type of course or institution attended, for either first-degree graduates or post-graduates. However, we will be publishing research evidence later this year on how lifetime earnings premia might differ according to institution attended.
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