Top PDF How To Know How Christianity Affects The U.S.

How To Know How Christianity Affects The U.S.

How To Know How Christianity Affects The U.S.

Evangelicals are born-again Christians who also believe strongly that the Bible is the written word of God and is totally accurate in all that it teaches, that they personally have a responsibility to tell other people about their religious beliefs, that Satan is a real being (not just a symbol of evil), that Jesus Christ was sinless when he lived on earth, that eternal salvation is possible through God’s grace alone (nothing we do can earn salvation), and that God is the all-powerful, all-knowing, perfect creator of the universe who rules the world today. Again, it has nothing to do with church attendance, denomination, or how they identify themselves.
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An Examination of U S  Presidential Candidates and How They Mobilize Youth

An Examination of U S Presidential Candidates and How They Mobilize Youth

Both parties believe that youth are the key to their party’s longevity and strength, however, only about two-fifths of local party leaders give priority to mobilizing young voters (Shea & Green, 2007: 21). Although parties state that youth are important, for the most part they have stopped grassroots mobiliza- tion of nonvoters (Shea & Green, 2007: 27). This is because party leaders’ today focus on mobilizing those they know will, firstly, show up and secondly, vote for their party (Holbrook & McClurg, 2005). Youth, for the most part, lack both of these characteristics and are, therefore, not highly targeted in direct mobilization efforts. With such low rates of turnout, politicians are unlikely to focus large sums of money on this group because it is not known if young people will even turn out at the polls. Not only do youth show up at abysmal rates, as individuals they lack the voting history that the parties rely on in order to determine which party they will vote for. Yet, as this investigation will reveal, those candidates who have actively pursued the vote of youth have been rewarded with high tur- nout of this age group, garnering a vast majority of those votes.
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How To Know How Diabetes Affects A Person In Illinois

How To Know How Diabetes Affects A Person In Illinois

In Illinois, according to the Illinois Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data, over the past 20 years, the number of people with diagnosed diabetes has more than doubled to approximately 800,000 in 2011 and an additional 500,000 people who are not aware that they have the disease. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 8.3 percent of the U.S. population or 25.8 million people (all ages) have diabetes. Of these approximately 7 million people do not know they have diabetes; making them at risk to develop other health
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Corruption, Nepotism or the “Whom You Know” Factor and How it Affects Recruitment in the Banking Sector of Ghana

Corruption, Nepotism or the “Whom You Know” Factor and How it Affects Recruitment in the Banking Sector of Ghana

Data gathering involves a chain of interrelated activities designed at collecting high-quality data to address emerging research questions and also to achieve the purpose of the study. Several scholars (Creswell, 2007; Crouch &McKenzie, 2006; Lee & Lings, 2008; Moustakas, 1994) are of the opinion that interviewing is one of the most commonly used strategies to collect information. This gives opportunity to people to share their stories and also allow their voices to be heard. Face-to-face in-depth interviews originated from the fields of psychoanalysis and psychology, which facilitates detailed answers that concentrate on specific issues, feelings, opinions and experiences (Lee & Lings, 2008). For this reason, the researcher employed this approach in gathering information on the practice of "Whom you know" in recruitment within the banking sector in Ghana. It was through the face-to-face interview process that the researcher sought to listen to each participant carefully in order to obtain a thorough understanding of the phenomenon (Creswell, 2014). Each interview lasted roughly 30- 45 minutes. Probing questions were employed to clarify and reveal additional information from various statements.
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How the U S  financial crisis could have been averted

How the U S financial crisis could have been averted

What makes the housing market different from other markets is that the market price for all homes is not only determined by demand –the need for homes based on population growth, the num[r]

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How good is your evidence and how would you know?

How good is your evidence and how would you know?

In the “green zone” (Fig. 4), the data are consistently ‘right’, in the “red zone” the data are ‘lying’ (anti-reliably providing support for the false hypothesis), but consistently so, and in the middle, “blue zone” , the data stream is highly inconsistent (in the urns example above, at P = .5 one would expect an equal number of red and blue balls in the sample drawn). Crucially, at the low likelihoods of the “red zone”, the consistency of the data bars the trust updating agent from detecting the anti-reliability. Because the agent starts from an uninformative prior of .5, the initial trust the agent displays means that the first few bits of data move the belief in the hypothesis below .5 and subsequent data are entirely consistent with this belief, meaning that the agent only becomes ever more convinced that the anti-reliable source is, in fact, reliable. As a consequence, faced with a ‘Cartesian Demon‘ [18] who systematically “directs his entire effort to misleading” a trust updater is ultimately as lost as the fixed trust agent. The belief-based trust updater can only exploit inconsistency in the data stream to modify its beliefs in the source’s reliability, and in the limit, where that inconsistency vanishes, the performance of the two agents converge. By the same token, the biggest difference between the types of agent is in the middle zone of high data variability (“blue zone”, Figure 4). However, the high variability of the data itself constrains how large a benefit the trust updater can accrue. Basically, precisely because the data are so variable, there is not much that can be learned here – as is apparent from the black line in Figure 4 which represents the error score of a Bayesian agent, who, like fixed-trust and trust-updating agent starts with an uninformative .5 prior, but actually knows the underlying likelihoods. Finally, in the “green zone”, where the data are consistent and reliable the updating agent performs less well than the fixed-trust agent, because the fixed-trust agent converges on the true hypothesis, and all trust updating does here is add noise to that convergence process as the update latches on to slight inconsistencies --in a mirror image to the dynamics just described for the other end of the liklihood range, that is, the “red zone”.
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HOW MUCH OUR GERIATRICS KNOW ABOUT THEIR MEDICATIONS

HOW MUCH OUR GERIATRICS KNOW ABOUT THEIR MEDICATIONS

2014. A total of 365 Geriatrics patients (≥ 65 years old) were included. The patients were recruited when they came for dispensing their prescriptions. The baseline characteristics were recorded. A Medication Knowledge Assessment questionnaire (MKAQ) available online by the American Society on aging and American Society of Consultant Pharmacy Foundation was used (1). Patients and or their caregivers were interviewed by a Geriatric Clinical Pharmacist (CGP) to fill the MKAQ. The major components include exploring knowledge of the medications in the following areas: Number of medications, Names, Indications, Directions of use, common side effects of each medication. The answers of all questions were either know or don't know. The knowledge and answers about side effects were classified as Correct, Incorrect or I don't Know. Date collection included number of clinics followed outside the tertiary care center, use of pain medications outside the prescriptions medication list, who gives the medications and how they perceived the health staff explanation about their medications. The answers to the latter were categorized to very clear, to a certain extent, not at all. Patients with Alzheimer's disease or on medications for dementia were excluded. Satisfaction of the participants was obtained after the study questionnaire was completed. No formal satisfaction survey was done but a simple question was asked if they found this interview helpful in enhancing the understanding of their medications. The study was approved by the Institutional review Board at the center.
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Know-How Nancy Protheroe

Know-How Nancy Protheroe

of the evaluation’s data base. However, descriptions of how the program func- tions or the feelings and attitudes of those involved with the program also can be useful data to collect. Data of this sort can provide context and might help to explain, for example, why the program isn’t working as well as expect- ed. Such qualitative information can be collected through surveys, interviews, or observations.

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How To Know If An Annuity Is Suitable

How To Know If An Annuity Is Suitable

20. If a client purchases a variable annuity but does not specify how the premium is to be invested, which of the following statement accurately describes how the premium may be invested during the free-look period? A. The premium may be invested only in fixed income investments

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How To Know If A College Is Profitable

How To Know If A College Is Profitable

While a majority of universities expect net tuition revenue growth in FY 2013, 18% of private university survey respondents project net tuition revenue declines in FY 2013, above the 1[r]

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How To Know Your Health

How To Know Your Health

evident in the report, it uses easy-to-read bar charts to indicate fitness levels for each of the completed tests. Comparisons between the past and the current tests allow for some indication of trends over time. Personalized feedback messages that appear in the text blocks help provide individualized feedback to the students. The feedback is processed using internal algorithms in the software that take into account a child’s overall fitness profile. Students with favorable scores on the assessments (i.e., those reaching the HFZ) receive congratulatory messages and remind-ers to maintain their involvement in physical activity. Students with less favorable scores (i.e., those in the “Needs Improvement” zone) receive supportive messages and prescriptive feedback about how to be more active and how to improve their scores.
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How To Know The Success Of A Cluster

How To Know The Success Of A Cluster

The analysis of the relationship between the intensity of individual services and the overall effect of the cluster management’s activities on business and R&D activities of SME d[r]

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Oklahoma Geographic Information Council

Oklahoma Geographic Information Council

 OSU Cooperative Extension Service can apply: management integration know how; planning framework know how; project building and setup know how; defined User interface communications; perform local level and State interagency interface building; applied GIS research/technical development, and produce ready packaged documentation and video tutorials to apply to further development of a Statewide Geographic information System

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A Critical Analysis On The Effcts Of Labeling On Social Interactions In The Mainstream Schools In Kenya.

A Critical Analysis On The Effcts Of Labeling On Social Interactions In The Mainstream Schools In Kenya.

mainstream in Kenya. The article sought to examine how stigmatization affects social interactions among learners with disabilities in the mainstream, to determine how mortification affects social interactions in the mainstream, examine how degradation affects social interactions in the mainstream, determine how humiliation affects social interactions in the mainstream and establish how rejection affects social interactions in the mainstream in Kenya. Literature review was based on the study objectives, research questions and gaps between the problem and literature review established. The study adopted a qualitative research methodology approach with critical analysis design. The study analysis was used to collect, analyze and interpret data from the study findings. The study established that learners with diverse special needs and disabilities do exist in the mainstream in Kenya and in large number. The interventions strategies that could best address and solve the problems facing social interactions among learners with special needs and disabilities in the mainstream were; at classroom level, the school level and at policy formulation level or the government. The findings of this study syllogized a conclusion that would ministrate the stakeholders which include peers, regular teachers and education policy makers to contrive strategies that could be used to connive at social interactions in the mainstream. The researchers recommended for progressive participation at classroom, school and government level for acquisition and learning of acceptable social interaction skills in the mainstream in Kenya.
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How Learning Affects Teaching 1. How Learning Affects Teaching. Geoffrey Bagnato. Lamar University

How Learning Affects Teaching 1. How Learning Affects Teaching. Geoffrey Bagnato. Lamar University

that if learning is to occur in its most efficient manner for each student, then we must provide each student with the opportunities and tools to learn for themselves. Learning becomes an intimate experience that only the learner can make sense of in his or her respective world. That being said, I find that there is a foundation of my beliefs set in constructivism and connectivism. As a constructivist, I believe that, “Reality is always tentative and dynamic” (Bates, 2014). Each student that walks into my classroom interprets the reality of my classroom in a different light. I must adapt my classroom by creating significant learning environments for each student or reality. I cannot tell the students what to learn and how to learn it, but I can choose the proper tools and resources that allow them to learn what our society has deemed appropriate for their age range. As a connectivist, I believe that
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How commuting affects subjective wellbeing

How commuting affects subjective wellbeing

The results also indicate that when commute time increases, job satisfaction reduces. The coefficient representing within-individual variation is significant at the 99% confi- dence level, indicating a robust relationship and the magnitude of effect is also quite large, at least when compared against the effect of income on job satisfaction—a 10-min increase in commute time (one-way) is equivalent to a 19% reduction in monthly income in terms of the effect on job satisfaction (on average). This finding implies that the journey to work has a bearing on how workers evaluate their jobs. Hence it is important for employers to recognise that the commute has a direct impact on employee satisfaction. This observation provides added justification for initiatives such as employer-based measures to improve commuting options and incentives for (new) employees to live within easy reach of the workplace. It also suggests potential to integrate employer-based initiatives for mobility management with wider ‘wellbeing at work’ policies.
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HOW AN ORGANIZATION AFFECTS MATHEMATICS TEACHING

HOW AN ORGANIZATION AFFECTS MATHEMATICS TEACHING

A basic organizational conflict is that of following policy vs. sensitivity to individual differences. Robert K. Merton investigated how following policy reduces sensitivity to individual differences. This conflict, for example, is the basis of the persistent tension in trying to follow a school policy providing equal educational opportunity that also tries to address the individual needs of the child For example,

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How the EU Affects Domestic Institutional Capacities : the Europeanisation of Greece’s Administrative System in the Context of the EU’s Regional Policy

How the EU Affects Domestic Institutional Capacities : the Europeanisation of Greece’s Administrative System in the Context of the EU’s Regional Policy

How the EU affects domestic institutional capacities: the Europeanisation of Greece’s administrative system in the context of the EU’s Regional Policy How the EU affects domestic institu[r]

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Science Wars: What Scientists Know and How They Know It

Science Wars: What Scientists Know and How They Know It

experience the world pretty much as it is. However, the distinction between primary and secondary sensations meant that the senses were not passive, so that experience was not of nature as it was in itself, though both were supposedly strictly correlated. Thus, the core task for modern science became correcting the distortions introduced by the senses in order to discover what was “really” out there and how it caused experience. But what if the mind and, perhaps, reasoning as well are not passive as they attempt to decode the encrypted messages about the world transmitted by the senses? What if they actively influence what we reflect on and how we reason, analogous to the way the senses influence our response to external stimuli? How is knowledge of nature then possible? Kant’s theory of an active mind is one of a class. What is common to them is that there are features of conscious experience and reasoning about it that originate in the mind and not in the world. If so, we cannot mean by knowledge, truth, and reality what the founders of modern science wanted to mean by those terms.
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Scientific epistemology: How scientists know what they know

Scientific epistemology: How scientists know what they know

Most readers will agree with these assertions, but how many of them actually know that the Earth is a spheroid, spins daily upon its axis, and orbits the Sun annually? Do they know these statements to be correct, or do they merely have faith that they are correct? The fact of the matter is that the vast majority of even physics majors will not know the basis for these statements that took scientists many years to develop. The facts underlying these understandings are by no means clear. Indeed, the philosopher-scientist Aristotle argued so eloquently against the motion of the Earth that his reasoning held sway for nearly two millennia. He argued that if the Earth were spinning we should feel the motion, encounter prevailing easterly winds, see the oceans cast off at the equator, and find that projectiles are left behind when thrown into the air – yet we see none of these! So, on what basis do current scientists make the above three claims? How do they know the answers; how do they justify their beliefs?
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