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IATA-Dangerous-Goods-Regulations

IATA-Dangerous-Goods-Regulations

S7-02 Patient specimens will only be accepted if assigned to UN 2814 or UN 2900 or UN 3373 as appropriate. Biological substance, Category B - UN 3373 may only be accepted for carriage under necessary requirements and after a prior Siberia Airlines written approval has been granted. S7-03 The Shipper must provide a 24-hour emergency telephone number of a person/agency who is knowledgeable of the hazards, characteristics and actions to be taken in case of an accident or incident concerning (any of) the dangerous goods being transported. This telephone number, including country and area code, preceded by the words "Emergency Contact" or "24-hour number" must be inserted on the Shipper's DGD in the "Additional Handling Information" box, e.g. "Emergency Contact +7 (495) 123 45 78". Add new TX (Air Cariabes)
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IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 54 th Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM III Posted 28 May 2013

IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 54 th Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM III Posted 28 May 2013

QK-02 The shipper must provide a 24-hour emergency telephone number of a person/agency who is knowledgeable of the hazards, characteristics and actions to be taken in the case of an accident or incident concerning each of the dangerous goods being transported. This telephone number, including the country and area code, preceded by the words “Emergency Contact” or “24-hour number”, must be inserted on the Shipper's Declaration for Dangerous Goods, preferably in the “Handling Information” box, e.g. Emergency Contact +1 514-123-4567 (see 8.1.6.11 and 10.8.3.11).
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IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 54 th Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM Rev. 1 Posted 23 December 2012

IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 54 th Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM Rev. 1 Posted 23 December 2012

USG-01 Transport of dangerous goods by air must be in accordance with United States Regulations (49 CFR Parts 171–180) or the ICAO Technical Instructions as limited by 49 CFR Part 171 Subpart C. The requirements of 49 CFR 175 apply to the offering, acceptance, and transportation of dangerous goods in commerce by aircraft to, from, or within the United States, and to any aircraft of United States' registry anywhere in air commerce. Part 175 contains additional requirements applicable to any person who performs, attempts to perform, or is required to perform a function subject to 49 CFR and is also applicable to air passengers and crew.
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IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 50 th Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM II Posted 30 March 2009

IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 50 th Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM II Posted 30 March 2009

Example 7: […] A mixture or solution that is not identified by name in Subsection 4.2 – List of Dangerous Goods and that is composed of two or more dangerous goods must be assigned to an entry that has the proper shipping name, description, hazard class or division, subsidiary risk(s) and packing group that most precisely describe the mixture or solution (see also Subsection 3.10, 4.1.2.1(c) and 4.1.2.1(d)).

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IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 56 th Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM 2 Posted 4 May 2015

IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 56 th Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM 2 Posted 4 May 2015

USG-02 In addition to the dangerous goods included in Subsection 4.2 (List of Dangerous Goods) with the word “Forbidden” shown in columns G/H, I/J and K/L and with no A1 or A2 Special Provision indicated, any material forbidden for transport by the United States' Regulations is also forbidden for transport under any circumstances to, from or within the United States (see 49 CFR 173.21 and the Hazardous Materials Table in 49 CFR 172.101).

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IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 51 st Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM Posted 31 March 2010

IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. 51 st Edition (English) Effective 1 January ADDENDUM Posted 31 March 2010

Instruction 622 and 8.1.3.3). IT-08 The shipper must provide a 24hrs emergency telephone number of a person/agency who is knowledgeable of the hazards characteristics and the actions to be taken in case of an accident or incident concerning each of the dangerous goods being transported. This telephone number, including the country and area code, preceded by the words “Emergency contact” or “24hour number” must be inserted in the “Additional Handling Information” box of the DGD.

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THE OFFERING OF DANGEROUS GOODS FOR CARRIAGE BY AIR

THE OFFERING OF DANGEROUS GOODS FOR CARRIAGE BY AIR

Class 8 Corrosives. Class 9 Miscellaneous Substances and Articles. The population of articles and substances that are called dangerous goods is divided into hazard classes, which identify the threats they may pose in transportation. Technical definitions for all hazard classes are found in the regulations. In the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations, they are found in Section 3, "Classification" for all non-radioactive materials, and, for Class 7, Section 10, "Radioactive Material". This information corresponds to Part 2 in the ICAO Technical Instructions. Each hazard class has specific criteria that are used to determine whether a substance belongs in that class. For example, the flash point - the lowest temperature at which a liquid gives off flammable vapours - is used to establish whether liquids are flammable enough to be placed in
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TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

3. The scope of the Model Regulations should ensure their value for all who are directly or indirectly concerned with the transport of dangerous goods. Amongst other aspects, the Model Regulations cover principles of classification and definition of classes, listing of the principal dangerous goods, general packing requirements, testing procedures, marking, labelling or placarding, and transport documents. There are, in addition, special requirements related to particular classes of goods. With this system of classification, listing, packing, marking, labelling, placarding and documentation in general use, carriers, consignors and inspecting authorities will benefit from simplified transport, handling and control and from a reduction in time-consuming formalities. In general, their task will be facilitated and obstacles to the international transport of such goods reduced accordingly. At the same time, the advantages will become increasingly evident as trade in goods categorized as “dangerous” steadily grows.
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TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

CONSIGNMENT PROCEDURES 12. Whenever dangerous goods are offered for transport certain measures should be taken to ensure that the potential risks of the dangerous goods offered are adequately communicated to all who may come in contact with the goods in the course of transport. This has traditionally been accomplished through special marking and labelling of packages to indicate the hazards of a consignment and through the inclusion of relevant information in the transport documents and by placarding of transport units. Requirements in this regard are provided in the Model Regulations annexed to this document.
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TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

10.1.2 Goods of Class 1 are assigned to one of six divisions, depending on the type of hazard they present (see paragraph 2.1.1.4 of the Model Regulations), and to one of thirteen compatibility groups which identify the kinds of explosive substances and articles that are deemed to be compatible. The general scheme for classifying a substance or article which is to be considered for inclusion in Class 1 is illustrated in Figure 10.1. The assessment is in two stages. In the first stage, the potential of a substance or article to explode should be ascertained and its stability and sensitivity, both chemical and physical, shown to be acceptable. In order to promote uniform assessments by competent authorities, it is recommended that, using the flow chart in Figure 10.2, data from suitable tests is analyzed systematically with respect to the appropriate test criteria. If the substance or article is provisionally accepted into Class 1, it is then necessary to proceed to the second stage and assign it to the correct division by use of the flow chart of Figure 10.3. With the exception of Compatibility Groups N and S, for which test data is necessary, assignment to a compatibility group is usually made without reference to testing. In the case of Compatibility Group S, the tests may be waived by the competent authority if classification by analogy is based on test results for a comparable article.
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TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

2. The recommendations concerning the transport of dangerous goods are presented in the form of “Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods”, which are presented as an annex to this document. The Model Regulations aim at presenting a basic scheme of provisions that will allow uniform development of national and international regulations governing the various modes of transport; yet they remain flexible enough to accommodate any special requirements that might have to be met. It is expected that governments, intergovernmental organizations and other international organizations, when revising or developing regulations for which they are responsible, will conform to the principles laid down in these Model Regulations, thus contributing to worldwide harmonization in this field. Furthermore, the new structure, format and content should be followed to the greatest extent possible in order to create a more user-friendly approach, to facilitate the work of enforcement bodies and to reduce the administrative burden. Although only a recommendation, the Model Regulations have been drafted in the mandatory sense (i.e., the word “shall” is employed throughout the text rather than “should”) in order to facilitate direct use of the Model Regulations as a basis for national and international transport regulations.
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TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

4.2.6 Transitional measures Portable tanks and MEGCs manufactured before 1 January 2012, that conform to the marking requirements of 6.7.2.20.1, 6.7.3.16.1, 6.7.4.15.1 or 6.7.5.13.1 of the Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods annexed to the 15th revised edition of the Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, as relevant, may continue to be used if they comply with all other relevant requirements of the current edition of the Model Regulations including, when applicable, the requirement of 6.7.2.20.1 (g) for marking the symbol “S” on the plate when the shell or the compartment is divided by surge plates into sections of not more than 7 500 litres capacity. When the shell, or the compartment, was already divided by surge plates into sections of not more than 7 500 litres capacity before 1 January 2012, the capacity of the shell, or respectively of the compartment, need not be supplemented with the symbol “S” until the next periodic inspection or test according to 6.7.2.19.5 is performed.
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Dangerous Goods Safety Guidance Note. Dangerous goods emergency plans for small businesses

Dangerous Goods Safety Guidance Note. Dangerous goods emergency plans for small businesses

In a few cases, if small business operators store more than ten times manifest quantities of dangerous goods, then the emergency plan needs to be supplemented with a FES emergency response guide. This is in the form of a Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) template, which is completed by the operator to give the emergency services responder vital information in a concise format. Information on how to obtain the template is contained in Resources Safety’s information sheet on emergency planning for licensed dangerous goods sites, which summarises an operator’s emergency planning requirements under regulations 75, 76A and 76B of the Storage and Handling Regulations.
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Transporting Dangerous Goods Safely

Transporting Dangerous Goods Safely

Incompatible dangerous goods must not be included in the same package. IATA imposes additional labelling requirements. Limited Quantities Limited Quantities of some less-hazardous dangerous goods (eg those that are allowed to be carried on passenger aircraft) may be transported in non-UN specification packaging provided special provisions are met. These provisions are detailed in IATA’s section 2.8. The packaging does not have to be officially tested in an approved laboratory to UN specifications, but it must meet the requirements of the relevant Packing Instruction specified in the relevant code. The package must be capable of passing the stacking test and be able to withstand a drop of 1.2 m onto solid concrete in the position most likely to cause damage. IATA denotes limited quantity Packing Instructions by a capital letter ‘Y’ in front of the Packing Instruction number. ICAO and IATA Packing Instruction 910 allows cosmetics, drugs and medicines (packaged for retail sale or distribution for personal or household consumption) to be packed in non-UN specification packaging to a total gross mass of 30 kg. Stretch or shrink-wrapped trays are not acceptable.
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DANGEROUS GOODS INSPECTORS HANDBOOK

DANGEROUS GOODS INSPECTORS HANDBOOK

DANGEROUS GOODS INSPECTORS’ HANDBOOK CHAPTER -1 INTRODUCTION TO DG SURVEILLANCE AUDIT India is a contracting state to the Convention of International Civil Aviation and a member of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has an obligation to promote the safe, orderly and efficient operation of aviation activities. To meet state obligations, DGCA has laid down national regulations to ensure compliance with various Standard & Recommended Practices laid down by ICAO in Annexes to the Convention. The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) is a regulatory body dealing mainly with safety issues. DGCA is also responsible for regulation of air transport services to/from/within India and for enforcement of civil air regulations, airworthiness and air safety.
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Hazardous, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous, NON-Dangerous Goods

If the directions for use on the product label are followed, exposure of individuals using the product should not exceed the above standard. The standard was created for workers who are routinely, potentially exposed during product manufacture. Biological Limit Values: As per the "National Model Regulations for the Control of Workplace Hazardous Substances (Safe Work Australia)" the ingredients in this material do not have a Biological Limit Allocated. Engineering Measures: Ensure ventilation is adequate to maintain air concentrations below Exposure Standards. Use only in well ventilated areas. Use with local exhaust ventilation or while wearing appropriate respirator.
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Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

National occupational exposure limits: No value assigned for this specific material by Safe Work Australia. Biological Limit Values: As per the "National Model Regulations for the Control of Workplace Hazardous Substances (Safe Work Australia)" the ingredients in this material do not have a Biological Limit Allocated. National occupational exposure limits: Natural ventilation should be adequate under normal use conditions.. Personal Protection Equipment: GLOVES, APRON, SAFETY GLASSES.

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Hazardous Substance, Non-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous Substance, Non-Dangerous Goods

If the directions for use on the product label are followed, exposure of individuals using the product should not exceed the above standard. The standard was created for workers who are routinely, potentially exposed during product manufacture. Biological Limit Values: As per the “National Model Regulations for the Control of Workplace Hazardous

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Introduction to the Transport of Packaged Dangerous Goods

Introduction to the Transport of Packaged Dangerous Goods

Directive (new TPED)) were made in September 2011. An even smaller amendment was made in 2013 affecting Schedule 2 to reflect the demise of the Health Protection Agency and take up of its duties by a Secretary of State. Northern Ireland (NI) makes its own equivalent statutory rules (one set for explosive, with another for all other dangerous goods). However these reflect the GB provisions. The GB and NI regulations are supported by a approved document known as the "Dangerous Goods: Approved Derogations and Transitional Provisions" (ADTP) which gives the applicable special derogations. A revised 2012 edition was published in March 2012. This had only relatively minor changes; except in relation to old tanks used only domestically, where significant changes to the requirements were made (albeit with transitional provisions).
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Hazardous Chemical, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous Chemical, NON-Dangerous Goods

13. DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS Persons conducting disposal, recycling or reclamation activities should ensure that appropriate personal protection equipment is used, see "Section 8. Exposure Controls and Personal Protection" of this SDS. If possible material and its container should be recycled. If material or container cannot be recycled, dispose in accordance with local, regional, national and international Regulations.

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