Top PDF Impact of Education Policies on STEM Education for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students

Impact of Education Policies on STEM Education for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students

Impact of Education Policies on STEM Education for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students

field. His experience in science was not great in high school. He asserted Physics was his only interesting science class. In biology, they mainly used power points. The third Deaf participant, a recent college graduate, went to a deaf residential school in high school, which was four hours away from her home. She would stay at the residential school during the week and return home on the weekends. Her parents are not in the scientific field, and she graduated with a Criminal Justice Masters degree, therefore her studies are concentrated in the humanities field. Her experience at the residential school has been mainly positive when it came to science and math. She had one math teacher for all the classes, since her school was very small. Her class was around twenty-five students. If she needed to take classes her school did not offer, it would be at the public school across the street. From her experience, she believed there should be more staff well equipped with mathematics and science. At the dormitory, there was two staff for each floor of students, from elementary to high school. Only one person out of six staff was equipped to help with math and science assignments. “The other staff members were much older, so it has been many years since they’ve taken those courses”.
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Academic attainment in deaf and hard-of-hearing students in distance education

Academic attainment in deaf and hard-of-hearing students in distance education

DHH students who have additional disabilities tend to be older than nondisabled students, they are more likely to be women, they have lower prior quali fications, and they are more likely to be receiving financial assistance than nondisabled stu- dents. They too are more likely to be studying modules in the arts or in social sciences than nondisabled students, and they are less likely to be studying modules in business and law or in mathematics and computing. They are less likely to com- plete their courses, less likely to pass the courses that they have completed and less likely to obtain good grades on the courses that they have passed than are nondis- abled students. The disparity in attainment between these students and DHH stu- dents who have no additional disabilities (see Table 6) presumably re flects the impact of other forms of disability on students ’ performance; the effects of these other disabilities were documented by Richardson (2010). These conclusions, too, remain the case when the effects of age, gender, prior quali fications and financial assistance on academic attainment have been taken into account.
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Faculty Handbook for Working with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

Faculty Handbook for Working with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

ABOUT HEARING DISABILITIES No two people with a hearing loss experience the loss in exactly the same way. There are several types of hearing loss and factors that determine the impact that the hearing loss has on language development. A person may be born with a hearing loss or may become hard of hearing due to an accident or illness later in life. If the age of onset occurs before the acquisition of language and the development of speech (roughly two years of age), the individual may have language-based deficiencies that interfere with language syntax and vocabulary that is auditory-based. Because the usual way of acquiring language through auditory means is affected by hearing loss, visual learning of language takes the place of auditory learning. People who are deaf or hard of hearing vary widely in their hearing and language abilities. Understanding the nature and extent of the hearing loss and how it affects the student is imperative in providing appropriate accommodations.
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Special Education: Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

Special Education: Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

Ranging from Agriculture to World Languages, there are more than 80 Praxis tests, which contain selected- response questions or constructed-response questions, or a combination of both. Who takes the tests and why? Some colleges and universities use the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators tests (Reading, Writing, and Mathematics) to evaluate individuals for entry into teacher education programs. The assessments are generally taken early in your college career. Many states also require Core Academic Skills test scores as part of their teacher licensing process.

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AN OVERVIEW THE BEST EDUCATION FOR DEAF AND HARD-OF-HEARING STUDENTS

AN OVERVIEW THE BEST EDUCATION FOR DEAF AND HARD-OF-HEARING STUDENTS

Fully Accessible Campus With more than 1,200 deaf and hard- of-hearing students in our college community, RIT has made sure our campus is fully accessible. Specially designed dorm rooms include strobe fire alarms and doorbells. Visual emergency warning systems are present in academic buildings, and an emergency notification system is in place for increased campus safety. RIT also provides high-speed computing access that is hard to beat anywhere. In fact, The Princeton Review consistently ranks RIT among the most connected campuses in the country.
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Accommodating Students with Hearing Loss in a Teacher of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing Education Program

Accommodating Students with Hearing Loss in a Teacher of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing Education Program

This further ensures that all classroom discussion is accessible to everyone - hearing, Deaf, or hard of hearing. Accommodations for distance learning. In the fall of 2008, some components of the York program began to be offered online, so that teachers outside of the Toronto area could access the program. The challenges inherent in providing a professional training program online are many and complicated. For example, how can one learn to troubleshoot an FM system online? A variety of options were researched, including review of other online Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing programs across the United States. Text-based courses for distance learning have the advantage of being cost effective and easy to develop; however, the York faculty felt that course content was too complex to be learned simply via readings, even with the incorporation of student learning tools (such as discussion boards). However, “synchronous courses” (in which instructor and students participate via webcams in real-time) can be extremely complicated and expensive to set up, although they offer the advantage of a real class with all its rich discussion, interactive learning, and peer conversation. If equipment problems arise at either the instructor’s or students
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Reading Comprehension in Deaf Education: Comprehension Strategies to Support Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Reading Comprehension in Deaf Education: Comprehension Strategies to Support Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

doesn’t necessarily need access to the text in his first language, but that for James it is extremely beneficial to translate texts into ASL. A strategy that one teacher uses in the school similar to reading a text in sign for the students, she has named the English/ASL Sandwich strategy. She discussed this strategy with the other teachers and I during the focus group. Using technology, she screen shots a page of a story and then puts it into a video format. In between each book page, some is video recorded interpreting that portion of the story into ASL. Switching from a screen shot of a page to an ASL interpretation goes back and forth from the beginning of the story to the end of the story. The teacher reported seeing “increased reading comprehension in all of the students when a story was transformed in this manner” (Focus Group Transcription, 2015). The teacher comment implies that providing a story in a way that combines reading and ASL helps to improve the reading comprehension of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, which supports earlier findings that providing text in the student’s first language increases reading comprehension. This strategy is another example of an uncommon reading comprehension strategy that is successful with deaf students. While common strategies tend to be successful with students who are deaf or hard of hearing, some additional strategies can be used or created specifically to meet the needs of these unique students.
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Handbook for Special Education: Deaf/Hard of Hearing Master s Degree Students

Handbook for Special Education: Deaf/Hard of Hearing Master s Degree Students

DIRECTED STUDIES A Directed Study is a course in which a student may receive university credit for undertaking an individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a UNC faculty member. The course number used is EDSE 622: Directed Studies. To undertake a directed study, obtain a form from the School of Special Education website. Complete the form and obtain signature approvals before taking or sending the forms to the registration center to register for the course. No faculty member will be authorized to supervise a directed study during a semester in which he or she is not actually employed on campus at UNC. A Directed Study investigation must be on a specific topic that is not duplicated by an existing course within the university's curriculum. The nature of the study must involve intensive use of relevant literature, materials, or techniques and the study report must reflect a synthesis of the information or techniques acquired. Credit for a directed study can vary from one to three credit hours. No more than two directed studies with a
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Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students: Perspectives from the Past and Vision for the Future

Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students: Perspectives from the Past and Vision for the Future

During the early years of my presidency, I was honestly amazed at the reaction young deaf children had to meeting a deaf university president. The experience got them thinking that if a deaf person could be a university president, then they too could achieve their dreams. Perhaps some of you work with children who are so young that a university president would mean nothing to them. I fully understand that, but I also know that even the very, very young child can relate to and benefit from role models who are like them. Very early in my presidency (I think I had only been president for a few weeks) I was attending a meeting in Providence, Rhode Island. I was invited to visit the Rhode Island School for the Deaf and accepted with pleasure. Because I was so recently in the news and with DPN being fresh in everyone's memory, there was a lot of attention given to my visit and a lot of press people were there.
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Scholarships for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Students

Scholarships for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Students

Alan Cuthbert Noonan Bequest Provided by: Alan Cuthbert Noonan Bequest For: Deaf /hearing impaired children in the Canterbury province to help with education, health, employment, social and recreational activities, service provision and equipment. Must provide proof of hearing loss and be a resident in the Canterbury province for more than 12 months and not be older than 21 years. Canterbury is inclusive of South Canterbury, Canterbury and North Canterbury. It is defined as the area north of the Waitaki River, south of the Conway River and east of the Southern Alps.
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NOTETAKING FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING STUDENTS

NOTETAKING FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING STUDENTS

P OSTSCRIPT PERTAINING TO LAWS AND REGULATIONS 1 This report does much to dispel the notion that note- taking is “no big deal.” It is clear from the level of detail regarding substantive notetaking skills as well as the detail regarding the establishment of policies, practices, and procedures for coordinating the provision and use of notetaking services that service providers should give a great deal of thought to the notetaking services provided by their institutions. Key points addressed include the fact that notetaking is itself a critical service and is not redundant to interpreting, for example. In addition, the recogni­ tion should be made that notes that may be adequate for or useable by hearing students may not be either adequate for or useable by deaf and hard of hearing students. The relevant language issues must be dealt with in a systematic and educated fashion. This chapter offers a “best practice” model of notetaking while discussing less thorough models which are nonetheless prevalent, and indeed adequate, on many college campuses. While the law does not require that institutions provide “Cadillac” note- taking services, a clear rationale for doing so is contained in this report.
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Deaf Education Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions of Scientific Inquiry and Teaching Science to Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

Deaf Education Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions of Scientific Inquiry and Teaching Science to Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

5 and focused on low level knowledge such as vocabulary or scientific concepts (Finson, 2010; Schmidt, McKnight, & Raizen, 1997; Tobin & Fraser, 1990; Woodbury, 1995). Since the dissemination of state mandated assessments, teachers have expressed distress about covering as many topics as possible (McDevitt, et al., 1999). From Fulp’s (2002) survey, 68% of elementary teachers reported concentrating on scientific concepts as opposed to inquiry (41%) and NOS (7%). In terms of pedagogy, 67% used teacher- directed/group discussion approaches but only 8% of instruction time was used for students to design their own investigations and 5% for sharing their findings. The latter two aspects of SI do not explain the relatively high percentage of time spent for inquiry- oriented lessons. Pulling out facts from textbooks to teach topic-oriented lessons, providing hands-on instruction without critical thinking or reflection opportunities, prescribed inquiry lessons and teaching low level science concepts can lead to the proliferation of alternative frameworks of scientific phenomena and limit opportunities for students to develop literacy skills (Abd-El-Khalick & Akerson, 2004; Abell, et al., 2010).
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Education of Deaf, Hard of Hearing and Deafblind People. Aims and Strategies

Education of Deaf, Hard of Hearing and Deafblind People. Aims and Strategies

"Educational policies should take full account of individual differences and situations. The impor- tance of sign language as the medium of commu- nication among the deaf, for example, should be recognised and provision made to ensure that all deaf persons have access to education in their national sign language. Owing to the particular communication needs of deaf and deaf/blind per- sons, their education may be more suitably provid- ed in special schools or special classes and units in mainstream schools.” (Section II. A. 21)

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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION. Program in the Education of Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing STUDENT HANDBOOK

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION. Program in the Education of Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing STUDENT HANDBOOK

accepts individuals from educational and non-educational backgrounds, provided they meet the admissions requirements. Those persons completing a degree program will qualify for certification in Special Education: Deaf Education from the State of Georgia. Students entering a Non-degree Program are not seeking a Masters Degree, but wish to: a) add a teaching field to an existing certificate, b) renew a teaching certificate, c) take courses for enrichment. Student may not take this option if they do not already have clear, renewable teaching certification. Students entering GSU as a non-degree admission may change to a degree program by reapplying to GSU and meeting admission requirements. No more than 9 semester hours of credit earned as a non-degree student may be applied towards meeting the requirements of a master’s degree in the College of Education.
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Best Practice for Deaf and Hard-of-hearing Student Success in Postsecondary Education

Best Practice for Deaf and Hard-of-hearing Student Success in Postsecondary Education

Deaf and Hard-of-hearing Persons (CEDHH) program at Northwestern Connecticut Community College (NCCC) has enrolled a consistent number.. of students who are deaf and hard-of-hearin[r]

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Knowledge and Attitudes of Faculty Members at a Saudi University  Toward Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in  Higher Education

Knowledge and Attitudes of Faculty Members at a Saudi University Toward Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Higher Education

In Saudi Arabia, deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) individuals rarely gain admission to Saudi universities, even though there is a law (i.e. the Disability Code) passed in 2000 to ensure that people with disabilities have equal access to post-secondary educational opportunities as their non-disabled peers. In the 16 years since the passage of this law, some attempts were made to enroll D/HH students in Saudi universities. Unfortunately, most of these attempts failed and therefore the actual enrollment of D/HH students in higher education is still limited. Possible reasons may include faculty members’ insufficient knowledge about, and negative attitudes toward, people who are deaf and hard of hearing. A literature review revealed few studies investigating faculty members’ knowledge and attitudes toward D/HH students. This study is designed to investigate the level of knowledge and the attitudes Saudi faculty members have about deaf and hard of hearing students. Data were collected through a convenience survey of selected faculty members in a single Saudi university. All participants in the study were faculty members (N=224) in the Humanities Colleges and Scientific Colleges at the university. A quantitative descriptive correlational analysis on the data revealed that faculty members who participated in the study generally have adequate knowledge about hearing loss and positive attitudes towards enrollment and instruction of this population of students. However, age, college type, academic rank and length of teaching experience were found to have significant effects on the knowledge and attitudes of faculty members, whereas gender was not a discriminating factor. Implications for deaf education in higher education institutions and recommendations for further study are provided based on the results of this study.
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Essential Components. Standards for Special Education. Deaf or Hard of Hearing. Students who are. for. < Amended June 2004 >

Essential Components. Standards for Special Education. Deaf or Hard of Hearing. Students who are. for. < Amended June 2004 >

Cochlear implant is “a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard of hearing. The implant is surgically placed under the skin behind the ear. An implant has four basic parts: a microphone, which picks up sound from the environment; a speech processor, which selects and arranges sounds picked up by the microphone; a transmitter and receiver/stimulator, which receive signals from the speech processor and convert them into electric impulses; and electrodes, which collect the impulses from the stimulator and send them to the brain. An implant does not restore or create normal hearing. Instead, under the appropriate conditions, it can give a deaf person a useful auditory understanding of the environment and help him or her to understand speech.”
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TIPS FOR TEACHING STUDENTS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

TIPS FOR TEACHING STUDENTS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

During class discussion, allow time for the deaf student to participate. Pause to give the deaf student time to communicate through the interpreter and for the interpreter to voice a question or answer back to you. If you are reading out loud, don’t read so quickly that the deaf student and interpreter can’t keep up with you and the rest of the class. This is just as important for the hard of hearing student who is speechreading or using an assistive listening device. You want all your students to have access to the best education possible, so be sure the interpreter is knowledgeable and qualified. Qualified interpreters have specialized training, a code of ethics and hold state and/or national certification. State rehabilitation services, college interpreter training programs, and state chapters of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf can assist. When the student relies on an interpreter, remember these points: Look at the deaf person not the interpreter when talking. Speak directly to that student, and don’t use third person speech. Make sure the student has a clear line of sight to you and the interpreter. Avoid having the interpreter sit or stand in shadows or in front of bright lights and windows. Don’t have the interpreter near sources of noise. Avoid private conversations with others in the presence of a deaf person because the interpreter must interpret everything said. Speak naturally; interpreters will ask you for clarification or to slow down. Finally, consider breaks if you have a long lecture. Signing and watching an interpreter require a lot more energy than simply listening.
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Program Handbook for Deaf and Hard of Hearing (D/HH) Education Specialist Candidates

Program Handbook for Deaf and Hard of Hearing (D/HH) Education Specialist Candidates

CLU Writing Center: Experienced Writing Center tutors help CLU's undergraduate and graduate students with their writing projects: reading free writes to find the best ideas; refining thesis statements; showing students how to structure paragraphs; and using specific exercises to improve sentence syntax. They work with whole classes as well as with individual students on the style guidelines required for papers in the various disciplines. All enrolled CLU students are invited to make use of our services. For additional information, please visit

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The use of music education in oral schools for children who are deaf and hard of hearing

The use of music education in oral schools for children who are deaf and hard of hearing

Because music participation has been positively linked both empirically and anecdotally to so many different areas of childhood development, one can naturally argue that music instruction should be utilized as much as possible within schools for children who are deaf and hard of hearing. Any school, despite its size, funding, or staff, can use music to support its curriculum. Many survey respondents reported that although they may not have a formal music program in place, they still find ways to use music in classroom lessons and activities. Creative teachers can incorporate music into their daily routines without having to use expensive materials or complicated curricula; this may include anything from singing songs during greeting, transition, and departure times to learning to play the instruments of a country the class is learning about. Teachers and school staff can also learn how to adapt their approaches to music instruction based on the developmental needs and ages of their students. Children in a toddler or preschool class might learn basic nursery rhymes and finger-play songs, while older children could learn how to play instruments and read musical notation.
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