Top PDF Implementation evaluation of Doncaster Children’s Services Trust. Final report, July 2017

Implementation evaluation of Doncaster Children’s Services Trust. Final report, July 2017

Implementation evaluation of Doncaster Children’s Services Trust. Final report, July 2017

Trust structure - The introduction of a locality model, and changes to the structure of Early Help led by DMBC, were seen by Trust staff and partners to have changed the organisational landscape of children’s social care services for the better. The locality model means Heads of Services for each area are now located with their team, leading to greater senior management visibility and involvement in case decisions (resulting in examples reported by staff and managers in interviews of better case handling and quicker decision-making on cases). Improved team working was reported by staff as resulting from the Intensive Family Support service, Assessment and Child Protection service and Children in Care service teams being located in the same building across locations, and therefore being more able to share information about cases. Since the implementation of the Early Help Partnership Strategy, a range of improvements have been identified through qualitative interviews and indicator analysis: increasingly clearer referral thresholds, examples of more appropriate referrals into social care, and stronger management structure and oversight. However, the Early Help Strategy Group have identified that further work is needed to consolidate the changes to Early Help and
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Creating Strong Communities in North East Lincolnshire. Evaluation report, July 2017

Creating Strong Communities in North East Lincolnshire. Evaluation report, July 2017

The implementation across statutory services has proved more challenging. It appears that this is due to relationships, workloads of social workers, culture and some confusion about the Audit Framework: “I am not sure what the purpose is. We are frequently audited in our service” (Service Manager). It has also taken time to arrange audits within teams and social workers are often difficult to get hold off. It is recognised by those involved that “it’s about building relationships and trust” (Advanced Practitioner). There is also evidence that the workforce has been anxious about the audits and have not fully understood their aims: “If I am honest I was dreading this meeting as I felt I would be put on the spot. However, this is not the case and I will use the work we did with my family” (Social Worker).
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Specialist Health and Resilient Environment (SHARE) Service. Evaluation report, July 2017

Specialist Health and Resilient Environment (SHARE) Service. Evaluation report, July 2017

Through the implementation of SHARE, evidence from this evaluation suggests that the primary outcome was achieved. Evidence suggests that during SHARE’s single assessment, all 37 young people who entered SHARE between October 2015 and the beginning of October 2016 were reported by staff as being at risk of requiring respite or planned short term breaks (defined as a Child in Need – CIN). However, during SHARE only 7 (19%) became Children in Need (CIN). After the single assessment, an assessment by a social worker and advanced mental health practitioner identified that 19 (out of the 37) were at risk of becoming looked after (LAC) by the local authority if services did not get involved. Out of these 19, only 2 (11%) became LAC whilst in SHARE.
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Khulisa Rehabilitation Social Action programmes Final Evaluation Report July, 2015

Khulisa Rehabilitation Social Action programmes Final Evaluation Report July, 2015

It  is  our  conclusion  that  the  Khulisa  Social  Action  intervention  programme  achieved  its   intended  aims  as  these  were  aligned  with  the  Rehabilitation  Social  Action  Fund  (RSAF)  and   priority  no  4  i.e.  creating  stronger  and  safer  communities.  Bearing  in  mind  the  sampling   caveats  as  well  as  the  short  timeframe  within  which  our  evaluation  was  carried  out,  a   reduction  of  re-­‐offending  is  indicated  as  well  as  an  increase  in  well-­‐being  and  attitudes.  In   particular,  the  results  show  that  the  proportion  of  Khulisa  programme  participants  (7.6%)   that  were  reconvicted  following  their  release  was  23.8%  percentage  points  below  that   observed  in  the  control  group  (31.4%).  In  comparison  to  the  programmes  studied  by  the   Ministry  of  Justice  Data  Lab  (the  list  can  be  accessed  through  the  published  Ministry  of   Justice  reports),  both  Silence  the  Violence  and  Milestones  (as  a  combined  innovative   approach)  score  significantly  high  providing  a  23.8%  recidivism  reduction.  
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The Children s Trust Job Escrapement

The Children s Trust Job Escrapement

The Children’s Trust is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people. To achieve our commitment, we will ensure continuous development and improvement of robust safeguarding processes and procedures that promote a culture of safeguarding amongst our workforce.

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Education & Training Foundation Training for Further Education teacher trainers: Final evaluation July 2017

Education & Training Foundation Training for Further Education teacher trainers: Final evaluation July 2017

Firstly, using the a comparison of the pre- and post-course surveys, we looked at changes in the confidence the participants felt about the themes explored in each session of the programme. All sessions led to increased confidence in at least half the participants (Figure 2), and all participants reported an increase in confidence against the content of multiple sessions. The reported decreases in confidence relate to a single participant. The relatively large numbers of participants reporting no change in confidence are reflective of the range of roles and levels of expertise of the participants, with different participants reporting no change in different areas. This reflects the range of expertise and role of the participants, and hints at the value of Participant . s suggestions above in relation to the facilitators gaining and explicitly making use of prior knowledge of the participants.
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Young People s Experiences with Health Services: Final Report

Young People s Experiences with Health Services: Final Report

Page | 29 This qualitative research study undertaken in 2005 sought to understand the perceptions of health, health concerns and health service needs among young people in a geographically isolated suburb of Sydney, New South Wales. Forty young people aged 14 to 24 years were recruited from two local government high schools, a local youth drop-in centre and the local community. Findings were reported as: personal safety is a primary health concern (more recreational facilities are needed to prevent drug and alcohol use related to boredom); health is more about quality of life than disease and illness; most health information is obtained from sources other than health providers (health education needs to help young people make wise choices for the future); and access to health services is a concern. The authors noted that young people would like to: understand how Medicare works; access health information anonymously; trust their service provider; and meet general practitioners in school and community settings and not just in the doctor’s consulting room. Overall, these young people require a whole of lifestyle approach to health, rather than the traditional medical model based on diagnosis and disease, and have healthy lifestyles promoted throughout the whole community, using youth workers and sporting leaders as role models 80 .
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Evaluation of teachers' pay reform : final report, October 2017

Evaluation of teachers' pay reform : final report, October 2017

The introduction of PRP for teachers was accompanied by concerns that the pay awards and progression between the main and upper pay range for female teachers relative to male teachers, and ethnic minority teachers relative to White British teachers would be unfairly disadvantaged. Are these equity concerns justified? This report has documented the patterns in the level and variation of teachers’ pay and the level and variation in annual pay awards for these subgroups of teachers throughout. From these statistics, there is little evidence that particular groups have been disadvantaged as a result of the reforms to teachers’ pay in aggregate. However, more in-depth research, which would take account of the distribution of teachers across teacher pay regions and school types, would be required to state this conclusively.
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Evaluation of the Court Integrated Services Program Final report

Evaluation of the Court Integrated Services Program Final report

Drug and alcohol services to justice clients were well-established prior to CISP, and all the agencies consulted receive justice clients from a variety of sources in the justice system. CISP clients represent a small component in the overall stream of justice clients who go through COATS and the service agencies, and their relationship with CISP is seen in the context of this wider relationship. A comment that was made to the evaluation team on a number of occasions was that most drug and alcohol clients have histories that include involvement with the justice system. The various justice referral processes thus constitute pathways into treatment rather than attributes of a client that are important in terms of the services and supports that are offered to them. Clinical issues (treatment readiness, severity of drug or alcohol problems) and support issues (accommodation, family support and financial status) are much more important considerations, and much of the feedback from drug and alcohol agencies concerned how justice processes generally bore on these factors.
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Strategic report 2017 on the implementation of the European Structural and Investment Funds  Report from the Commission  COM (2017) 755 final, 13 December 2017

Strategic report 2017 on the implementation of the European Structural and Investment Funds Report from the Commission COM (2017) 755 final, 13 December 2017

For social innovation, many Member States have selected projects worth EUR 1.7 billion. The nature of these projects varies greatly and includes the implementation of innovative solutions for education and entrepreneurship, including for women with different ethnic backgrounds. The ESI Funds continue to assist Member States, regions and cities in their efforts to deal with the refugee and migration crisis. A number of programmes have been modified to include new or improved measures to address both immediate needs and the more long-term challenges of integration. For instance, concrete projects are delivering healthcare and social services for refugees and migrants. In addition, targeted cooperation with mayors was launched. Several cities, partners and national authorities are being mobilised within the Urban Agenda for the EU and its partnership to integrate migrants and refugees 13 . The Commission also proposed that the Multiannual Financial Framework review include a regulatory change 14 introducing a dedicated investment priority to make it easier to take measures targeting such integration. The ERDF addresses the long-term social and economic integration of refugees and migrants in Europe, covering for instance investments in housing and childcare infrastructure or business start-ups. By the end of 2016, the ESF and the YEI supported at least 1.2 million people who were either migrants, had a foreign background or were from a minority group.
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The Islington ‘Doing what counts : measuring what matters’. Evaluation report, July 2017

The Islington ‘Doing what counts : measuring what matters’. Evaluation report, July 2017

‘I try to get parents to mentalise the children at all times. So it’s constantly using their own words and being in their space and then for them to sort of mentalise the social worker as well. So from my perspective, how does that look, you know? Constantly having those conversations and that brings up… that brings up un- comfort for parents and it’s about working with that un-comfort.’ (Social Worker) Access to psychological expertise and explanation through the enhanced offer (itself developed out of the well-indicated team around the worker model (Bevington et al. 2013) was celebrated universally, as being a means of theorising parent (and child) states of mind. This was seen as being enhancing of therapeutic understanding as well as supportive of effective intervention planning: ‘What the psychologist very eloquently, very nicely said, don’t be afraid to challenge, and you're going to have to say, after 5 minutes, you’ve talked enough now, and I need to talk. And I must admit, I - I'm speaking personally here - I didn’t know I can do that. But maybe in the MSW setup, if we'd have had access to the psychologist much earlier on, in the referral stage…’ (Team Manager). It is important to note here that practitioners were expressing fears, not simply that the integrity of the statutory role was compromised by MSW methodology, but also that their capacity to elicit change through the use of MI theory in practice, once that role was confirmed, still fell short. Without this understanding of how to engage parents and children, where changed thinking and behaviour were not so readily accessible, the risk was that social workers would conclude that MI theory was ineffective in practice. Moving through and beyond uncertainty and anxiety
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Evaluation of the Autism Education Trust Programme, 2017 2018

Evaluation of the Autism Education Trust Programme, 2017 2018

Setting 6 was a small, 216 place primary school. In terms of the evaluation, the setting was of interest in that the greater part of its autism education knowledge came from its engagement with the AET Programme. All the school staff had undertaken AET Programme training, tier 1, while the SENCo had undertaken tiers 1, 2 and 3, and was, as a result, the school’s autism lead. The SENCo gave accounts of the value of AET Programme training and materials that stressed the importance of AET sourced knowledge, and the impact on the confidence of the SENCo and staff in acting to support children with autism. In addition, the SENCo had begun to use the AET Standards and the Competency Framework to embed good practice in the school. During the period of the evaluation, the SENCo also began to trial the AET Progression Framework, finding the ability to record social and emotional progress valuable. Other sources of autism knowledge and support for the school came from the local autism outreach team (which was also responsible for delivering the AET Programme in the area) and some experience-based knowledge.
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2017 Power Engineering Excellence Trust Annual Report

2017 Power Engineering Excellence Trust Annual Report

The Power Engineering Excellence Trust are deemed a qualifying entity within the Framework for Differential Reporting, on the basis that they are not publicly accountable and are not large. As such, the Power Engineering Excellence Trust has taken advantage of all differential reporting concessions available to them except for FRS19 Accounting for Goods and Services Tax and FRS 10 on Cash Flows, with which they have complied fully. PRESENTATION CURRENCY AND ROUNDING

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Evaluation of the Autism Education Trust Programme, 2016 2017

Evaluation of the Autism Education Trust Programme, 2016 2017

 The success of the Exclusions Project in supporting nearly 12,000 parents/carers through a variety of platforms during the AET Programme 2016-17, illustrates the continuing need for such support. The data gathered by the evaluation from parents/carers who attended the exclusions seminars, run as part of the Exclusions Project, suggests that the issues faced by CYPA in relation to exclusions continue to be problematic. The exclusions issue is complex, combining structural, personal, and legal challenges for parents/carers of CYPA in their dealings with educational settings and other stake holders. In consequence, it is important the Exclusions Project continues to be offered to parents/carers and educational settings concerned with the support of CYPA. In addition, the role of the volunteer support worker on the Exclusions Project should be noted as an important, but challenging one. The initial intention to recruit and train five volunteers proved difficult, and only one volunteer was active at the time of the evaluation. Some thought might be given to ways in which additional volunteers can be recruited in future.
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FINAL REPORT. July Report No. SR-MSHA-11

FINAL REPORT. July Report No. SR-MSHA-11

OPEGA initially sought to determine whether households being weatherized under WAP were reflective of the stated priorities by cross-referencing the database which contains information on weatherized households with the High User List generated each year. However, we were unable to adequately match these different documents to conclusively determine the demographic characteristics of those served. (See Recommendation 3.) Instead, OPEGA surveyed the CAAs on how they select households to weatherize and reviewed the demographic data on unduplicated household counts that MaineHousing submits annually to HHS. CAAs generally report that the vast majority of their weatherization clients are either identified through the High User List or the current year’s LIHEAP application intake process. MaineHousing’s reported demographic data on weatherized households also shows that each year about three in every four households served contains a household member who is disabled or vulnerable to hypothermia.
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FINAL EVALUATION REPORT

FINAL EVALUATION REPORT

The  evaluation  activities  were  carried  out  during  the  entire  project  period  (24  months)  and   included  interviews  with  the  project  partners,  to  see  how  far  the  aims,  tasks  and  procedures   were  understood  and  accepted  or  which  problems  appeareded  among  the  partners  (e.g.   shortfalls  in  the  communication  etc.)    

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CHILDREN S MEDICAL SERVICES

CHILDREN S MEDICAL SERVICES

PC Project Administrator: Cathleen Mark CMAT Medical Director: Henry Dumas, M.D.. MFC Medical Director : Thomas Philpot, M.D.[r]

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Evaluation of Autism Education Trust Training Hubs Programme, 2013 15 : final report

Evaluation of Autism Education Trust Training Hubs Programme, 2013 15 : final report

The four schools exhibited varying degrees of work with parents/carers of children with autism. One school (SV1) had no overall approach to working with parents/carers, and relied on ad hoc contacts. Nonetheless, the school interviewee was aware of this, and said that ‘it’s certainly something that I would like to develop […] being able to engage the parents, and reassure them’ (SV1). By contrast, school SV2 ran an active parent partnership group, and the Lead Practitioner TA was able to give a good example of how the school was working with the parents of a boy with autism to help his transition to a new home: ‘they’ve recently moved house, so they sent me the details of the house, so I printed it off and said to the boy, “this is your bedroom, this is your lounge”. And, on top of that, mum would drive him to the house every night and say this is where we are moving to’ (SV4).
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To: The Education and Children s Services Scrutiny Board (2) Date: 2 July 2015

To: The Education and Children s Services Scrutiny Board (2) Date: 2 July 2015

3.4 One of the SSSO’s key functions was to produce a service level agreement for schools which provided a range of training and support for school governors at all stages of their experience and development. A full range of training and support will continue to be provided, but in a different way, through The Coventry Teaching School’s Alliance. Events will include: new governor induction, effective challenge and support, getting to good and outstanding, effective monitoring and evaluation, safeguarding for governors, governors role in performance related pay and appraisal, new Ofsted inspection framework training, good governance: knowing your school plus cluster or bespoke training requested by individual governing bodies or school networks.
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Evaluation of autism education trust training hubs programme, 2011 13: final report

Evaluation of autism education trust training hubs programme, 2011 13: final report

‘I came to the training as a parent with an autistic child. I hold a NVQ3 in children's care and learning development and completed lot of special needs courses at [name of school]. Coming to autism training was very special for me. The training helped me to build a very good relationship with my child. For example, before coming to the training I was not patient with my child specially when helping to do activities, homework or the way I would speak to him. Now I change the way I communicate with him. My child is very happy to speak to me. Before the training, my child was struggling with his handwriting. He was panicking when he had to do the handwriting homework at home because he knew that I will start shouting to him to get it right. After the training, I became more patient with him. I started praising him and giving reward after his homework. Now, his handwriting has improved a lot that even his teacher asked me how it happened. He is more confident in doing thing like choosing what he wants for dinner, how to brush his teeth, how to use the shower and speak to me when he needs something. I value him more than I did before. I am confident to plan activities for him with his carer and help the teacher when she needed to know something about him. I am now able to give advice to other parents who are struggling with their autistic children.’
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