Top PDF Implementation of the national funding formula for schools in England

Implementation of the national funding formula for schools in England

Implementation of the national funding formula for schools in England

As noted in section 1, above, school level figures are notional as the NFF will be introduced in a ‘soft’ version for 2018-19 and 2019-20 at least. This is where the Government uses the formula to set budgets for each school which are then added together to give the total schools block allocation for each local authority. It is then up to each local authority to distribute this total between local schools using their own local formula, as at present. Hence school-level figures are notional or illustrative as are constituency summaries which are built up from school level data. The DfE has also published unit funding figures per pupil for at primary and secondary levels, but only for local authorities and only in 2018-19. The range of underlying data on the NFF also includes the impacts for each local authority of the high needs NFF and the central school services block. None of the data includes funding for early years, 16 to 19 year olds or the pupil premium, all of which are outside the
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The short- and long-run impact of the national funding formula for schools in England: IFS Briefing Note BN195

The short- and long-run impact of the national funding formula for schools in England: IFS Briefing Note BN195

The government is embarking on the single largest reform of the school funding system in England for the last 25 years. Currently, the level of funding a school receives is determined by a local-authority-specific funding formula and the amount each local authority receives from central government. The proposed reform, due to be introduced from financial year 2018–19, will replace the 152 different local authority funding formulae with one single National Funding Formula (NFF). When fully in place, this would ensure similar schools in different parts of the country receive a similar amount of funding. While this has been the ambition of successive governments, they have consistently shied away from the hard choices such a reform entails. The current government is to be applauded for making specific proposals, setting out the reasons for the choices it has made and publishing a large amount of data alongside these proposals to enable effective scrutiny.
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School funding reform in England from 2018-19 : implementation of the national funding formula

School funding reform in England from 2018-19 : implementation of the national funding formula

sufficiency of the school funding ‘pot’, given cumulative cost pressures on schools, inflation and rising pupil numbers. Many have also pointed out that any future protections or cash increases under the reformed school funding system from 2018-19 do not provide redress for funding pressures schools have already absorbed. The Government accepts schools are facing cost pressures, but argues that overall funding for the education budget has increased, and will continue to increase; also, it says it is supporting schools to operate more efficiently.
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School funding in England : current system and proposals for 'fairer school funding'

School funding in England : current system and proposals for 'fairer school funding'

Although these proposals do not represent implementation of a national funding formula, this is the biggest step towards fairer funding for schools in a decade. The proposals we are announcing today put us in a much better position to implement a national funding formula when the time is right. This will be when the government has set spending plans over a longer period of time, allowing us to give schools and local authorities more certainty about how the formula will affect them over a number of years. 39

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School funding in England : FAQs

School funding in England : FAQs

A new national funding formula is being used to calculate core school funding in 2018-19 and future years. There are separate funding formulas for high need (mostly special educational needs funding), services centrally provided by local authorities, and early years provision. Local authorities receive a block grant from the DfE, called the Dedicated Schools Grant, or DSG. For the time being, the schools NFF is only being used to work out notional allocations for individual schools. These are then summed and passed on to local authorities, who then draw up local funding formulas for onward distribution. As such, the NFF is operating in a ‘soft’ format.
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School funding reform : an empirical analysis of options for a national funding formula

School funding reform : an empirical analysis of options for a national funding formula

A national funding formula would need to set monetary values for these AWPU factors. If it is not intended to redistribute funding from secondary to primary schools compared with the current system, then a national funding formula would need to allocate higher amounts of basic funding to secondary schools. However, a government may well wish to alter the distribution of such funding in favour of primary schools on the grounds of early intervention. The main argument in favour of higher funding for secondary schools would be the higher costs associated with secondary teaching – for example, the breadth of subjects and the materials required. The most recent consultation did not set out a preferred value for AWPU factors. Instead it simply argued that there should be greater harmonisation in total funding per pupil across the country. The government proposed that local authorities should work towards providing 27% more funding for secondary school pupils than for primary school pupils. However, instead of stipulating 1.27 as an exact target, the consultation proposed a range of permissible ratios around 1.27, as a compromise. The width of this range has not been determined; there is clearly a trade-off between the degree of harmonisation achieved and the number of local authorities that must alter their relative funding levels. Figure 3.2 plots the current level of the ratio between secondary and primary school funding for each local authority in England (represented by the vertical grey bars, ordered from highest to lowest). The solid black line marks the ratio that the government believes local authorities should converge towards (1.27). It is very clear from the graph that in a
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8050, 13 September 2017: New early years funding formula from 2017-18, including maintained nursery schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8050, 13 September 2017: New early years funding formula from 2017-18, including maintained nursery schools (England)

such as delivering teacher-led provision. The government recognises that MNS bear costs over and above other providers. For this reason, the government will provide supplementary funding of £55 million a year to local authorities for the duration of this Parliament. This will enable local authorities to maintain their current funding levels for MNS during the wider changes in early years funding, and ensure that the important contribution these schools make to the social mobility of young children in disadvantaged areas and the wider early years sector continues. As the universal base rate is introduced, we will allow local authorities to continue to provide a higher level of funding to maintained nursery schools. We remain committed to consulting in regard to the future role of maintained nursery schools and how best to secure their high quality provision for the longer term. 35
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Oral statement to Parliament : Justine Greening statement on national funding formula, 14 September 2017

Oral statement to Parliament : Justine Greening statement on national funding formula, 14 September 2017

We recognise the challenges of the very lowest funded schools so will introduce a minimum per pupil funding level. Under the national funding formula, in 2019-20 all secondary schools will attract at least £4,800 per pupil. Today I can announce that all primary schools will attract at least £3,500 per pupil through the formula in 2019-20. And the formula will provide these levels of funding quickly: secondary schools will attract at least £4,600, and primary schools £3,300 in 2018-19; and then the full amounts the following year.
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FUNDING FORMULA Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

FUNDING FORMULA Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Current charter school funding is derived from actual expenditure per pupils for the sending communities. In many cases, districts’ per pupils are nearly two times national and regional averages for education spending. Therefore, some districts may need to reduce their education expenditures. In other cases, some districts may not be contributing sufficient funds to support the BEP and other programs required by law or regulations. These districts will need to start increasing their local contribution. Charter schools will receive the state share of the core instruction amount and student success factor and their share of the local property tax revenue. Changes in state and/or local funding will be transitioned over a period of time so that charter schools will have a number of years to plan.
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Funding the teaching of medical students in general practice: a formula for the future?

Funding the teaching of medical students in general practice: a formula for the future?

The costs of general practice undergraduate education need to be estimated initially and recurrently to ensure that they are accurate and the NHS spend keeps up with changes in actual costs. This will be a major burden on teaching practices and expensive. We propose that the process is streamlined, only gathering practice-specific data from practices, the rest being obtained directly from medical schools. Schools have explicit expectations of their practices in terms of weekly timetables, expected sacrifice of clinical service and premises requirements. The financial data with which to cost these exist. Schools could also estimate a large part of the indirect costs. They understand the challenges of managing teaching in practices and often have standard operating procedures which can be costed. They know with which practices their students are placed and the travel burden they face. They can determine their own indirect costs of running their placement programs. We consider that that the average costs of undergraduate education in England can be reliably estimated from such data: the alternative is to audit a sample of the 3861 practices which teach for English schools 22 rather than conduct an audit of the 25 schools. The unknown is of
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Flintshire County Council Schools Funding Formula Review Primary Consultation Response Analysis

Flintshire County Council Schools Funding Formula Review Primary Consultation Response Analysis

If not agreed to, this could affect the effective implementation of the Foundation Phase. We agree on the basis that the funding that is currently allocated to FP should be the minimum amount added to the current budget to maintain the allocations and provision. As long as we can maintain our current Foundation Phase staffing levels. We do not want to go into a situation where we have to make redundancies. This has always been recognised under the present system. The different grades needed in FP needed to be more

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Italian and English local funding networks: Is there a winning formula?

Italian and English local funding networks: Is there a winning formula?

influence EU policy by lobbying their respective governments, while member states bargained with each other at the European level (known as the state-centric approach) (Moravscsik, 1993; Anderson, 1990). Rhodes (1997) presented the state-centric and the MLG approaches as mutually inclusive. In England, the central government maintained the role of gate-keeper: it influenced access to the networks and controlled the implementation of the structural funds. It created Government Offices (reporting to the central government) for the control and co-ordination of the structural funding applications (state-centric factors). Also, most English local authorities became more sophisticated lobbyists, setting up offices in Brussels. They appointed full-time European specialists to deal with the increasing number of networks both domestic and European. Finally, local authorities assisted to the introduction of new actors to regional policy networks which included the local community, voluntary organisations and the local businesses (Goldsmith, 1993; Barber and Millns, 1993; Garmise, 1997; Rhodes, 1997) (MLG factors).
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School funding : moving towards a national funding formula : March 2015

School funding : moving towards a national funding formula : March 2015

8 ASCL recognises that these proposals will be a major assistance to financially hard pressed schools in a number of parts of the country and for schools in some authorities this moves them in the direction of a fairer and more equitable funding system. However we take issue with some of the statements given in this section of the consultation paper (paragraphs 1 to 4) surrounding the proposal to provide an uplift above the flat cash level to some Local Authority areas but that fall outside the remit of the very specific invitation for views. The consultation makes assumptions about which areas are least fairly funded as there is no rationale given for determining what constitutes ‘fair funding’. There is also a significant overstatement about how far these
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The implications of the National Funding Formula for schools

The implications of the National Funding Formula for schools

The overall pot of money being allocated through the schools block is increasing modestly in 2018- 19 and 2019-20. As explained in the previous chapter, this allows the Department to maintain a -1.5 per cent Minimum Funding Guarantee for schools set to lose funding, while also enabling gaining schools to receive increases of up to 5.5 per cent by the end of the spending review period. This means that, at a national level, the overall schools budget is increasing in cash terms. But the proposed formula means that the redistribution of the existing budget, plus the distribution of the additional £400m, has very different implications for individual schools and local authorities. The current rate of local authorities’ per pupil unit of funding and changes in pupil demographics over the last few decades. By definition, the proposed formula allocates a single value for each pupil and then sets values based on the characteristics of those pupils. Areas which currently have a relatively high per-pupil value and where the demographics of the local population have changed over a generation (particularly those which have become more affluent), are more likely to see reductions to their funding as a result of this redistribution. This is one of the reasons behind the reductions we observe in London, which are explored throughout this chapter.
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Toward a Grand Vision: Early Implementation of California's Local Control Funding Formula

Toward a Grand Vision: Early Implementation of California's Local Control Funding Formula

California  has  taken  the  first  steps  down  an  historic  path  that  fundamentally  alters  how  its  public  schools   are  financed,  education  decisions  are  made,  and  traditionally  underserved  students’  needs  are  met.  The   Local  Control  Funding  Formula  (LCFF),  passed  with  bipartisan  legislative  support  and  signed  into  law  by   Governor  Jerry  Brown  on  July  1,  2013,  represents  the  most  comprehensive  transformation  of  California’s   school  funding  system  in  40  years.  
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HE in England from 2012 : funding and finance

HE in England from 2012 : funding and finance

The Government raised the cap on tuition fees for new student to £9,000 in 2012/13 and cut most ongoing direct public funding for tuition in England. This shifted the balance of higher education funding further away from the state and further towards the individual who benefits. Students can take out publicly subsided student loans to pay these higher fees. There is uncertainty about the final size of this subsidy and the Government’s estimate of it has increased considerably since the reforms were first announced. This also affects the size of any saving in public expenditure and the extent of the shift in costs from the state to the individual beneficiary.
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NGB Funding   An analysis of the funding profiles of National Sports Organisations

NGB Funding An analysis of the funding profiles of National Sports Organisations

There is, however, an equally widespread belief that governing bodies have in several cases been unbalanced by changes made in order to access or deliver new funding programmes. That is to say, organisational structures have in some cases ‘grown like topsy’ in response to the initiation of new Sports Council programmes, rather than through the deliberate meeting of the identified and specific needs of the business. Where such organic change has taken place, it has of itself created a consequent requirement for additional restructuring work to redress that balance; thus the Sports Councils have been required to support the resolution of a problem which they themselves have created.
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HE in England from 2012 : funding and finance

HE in England from 2012 : funding and finance

The 2012-13 funding letter highlighted the ‘significant and increasing pressures’ on BIS budgets. It announced the creation of a £62 million ‘unallocated provision’ to meet any unforeseen pressures on the Department’s higher education budget. This has been created by cutting the Voluntary Matched Giving fund in 2012-13 from its earlier indicative level of £52 million to zero and by cutting the Access to Learning Fund by £10 million (compared to the indicative level). The funding letter restated earlier instructions to HEFCE about recouping funding from institutions that over recruit students in 2012 and again warned of the prospect of cutting HEFCE’s grant in 2012-13 or future years if over recruitment results in higher student support costs or causes other pressures on BIS budgets. 38 The note HE in England from
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Access to special schools in England

Access to special schools in England

This is not a measure of the struggle to attend a ‘good’ school, these are the distances travelled across all special schools. Many pupils will be travelling long distances to reach the schools that best meet their specific need and gives them the best chance in life; others may have no such school within any sensible definition of a ‘reasonable travel distance’.

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The national curriculum in England

The national curriculum in England

For pupils who do not have the phonic knowledge and skills they need for year 2, teachers should use the year 1 programmes of study for word reading and spelling so that pupils’ word rea[r]

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