Top PDF Improving behaviour in schools : guidance report

Improving behaviour in schools : guidance report

Improving behaviour in schools : guidance report

In another promising study, teachers in disruptive classes of pupils aged between 9 and 14 years old were trained over two 45-minute sessions to increase their use of behaviour-specific praise. Teachers were given reminders at intervals to praise students, alongside training focused on the ‘magic 5:1 ratio’ of positive-to-negative interactions. The 5:1 ratio theory is that for every criticism or complaint the teacher issues, they should aim to give five specific compliments, approval statements and positive comments or non-verbal gestures. This ratio has been shown to be key to long-lasting marriages and has been explored in other fields, such as medicine and business. Several interventions focusing on positive approaches to behaviour in classrooms promote this idea, but this research was the first experimental study to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of the approach. Over the two-month study, pupils increased their on-task behaviour by an average of 12 minutes per hour (or an hour per day), while pupils in similar comparison classes did not change their behaviour. This study implies that teachers with disruptive classes could benefit from increasing their positive interactions with pupils.
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Improving literacy in secondary schools : guidance report

Improving literacy in secondary schools : guidance report

This guidance report aims to help secondary schools improve literacy in all subject areas. It provides seven recommendations related to reading, writing, talk, vocabulary development and supporting struggling students. Throughout the report, recommendations emphasise the importance of disciplinary literacy. Disciplinary literacy is an approach to improving literacy across the curriculum. It recognises that literacy skills are both general and subject specific, emphasising the value of supporting teachers in every subject to teach students how to read, write and communicate effectively in their subjects.
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Ventilation and indoor air quality in schools : guidance report 202825 : building research technical report 20/2005

Ventilation and indoor air quality in schools : guidance report 202825 : building research technical report 20/2005

This report is deliverable number 202825 of project cc2108 ‘Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Schools’. Responsibility for the ventilation of schools premises has been transferred from the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) to the Building Regulations Division of ODPM. The ventilation design of schools now falls under the control of Buildings Regulation Approved Document F. A previous literature review of research carried out in schools (BRE Client Report 216084) has highlighted the fact that little is known about the ventilation performance of schools. By comparison, within the UK, there is significant information available for other indoor environments, such as workplaces and dwellings, and the benefits derived from good ventilation and indoor air quality.
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Improving reporting of meta‐ethnography: The eMERGe reporting guidance

Improving reporting of meta‐ethnography: The eMERGe reporting guidance

The eMERGe reporting guidance is designed for use by researchers conducting a meta-ethnography (referred to throughout as “reviewers”: the term “reviewers” for people who conduct and report meta-ethnographies was the preferred term identified from the eMERGe Delphi studies in line with the increasing use of systematic review methodology for qualitative evidence syntheses), peer reviewers, journal editorsand end-users of meta-ethnographies including policy makers and practitioners. The eMERGe guidance also provides a helpful structure for anyone contemplating or con- ducting a meta-ethnography. While the guidance was developed for meta-ethnogra- phy, some of the reporting criteria, such as those relating to stating a review question and reporting literature search and selection strategies, might also be applicable to other forms of qualitative evidence synthesis and thus overlap with the generic ENTREQ guidance for reporting a wide range of qualitative evidence syntheses (Tong et al., 2012). In contrast to eMERGe, ENTREQ does not provide guidance regarding reporting of the complex analytic synthesis processes (Phases 4 – 6) in a meta-ethnogra- phy and did not follow good practice guidance for developing a reporting guideline (Moher et al., 2010), for example, it was not designed with the consensus of a wider community of experts (Flemming et al., 2018; Cunningham et al., in press).
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Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: the eMERGe reporting guidance

Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: the eMERGe reporting guidance

Readers should refer to and use all three parts of the guidance. Parts 1 and 2 of the eMERGe reporting guidance are organized by the seven phases of meta-ethnography. Suggestions are provided in the grey cells of the table in Part 1 for where specific reporting criteria could be reported under journal article section headings. Where appropriate, reviewers should also consider additional relevant guidance for reporting other common qualita- tive evidence synthesis steps and processes, such as searches for evidence. See for example, the “ STARLITE ” guidance [36] and PRISMA [28] for reporting literature searches (refer to the EQUATOR Network for a compre- hensive database of up-to-date reporting guidance https:// www.equator-network.org/). Part 3 covers eMERGe exten- sions for format and content of the meta-ethnography output (for example, of an abstract); assessment of meth- odological strengths and limitations of included primary
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Improving reporting of Meta-Ethnography : the eMERGe Reporting Guidance

Improving reporting of Meta-Ethnography : the eMERGe Reporting Guidance

The eMERGe reporting guidance is designed for use by researchers conducting a meta-ethnography (referred to throughout as “reviewers”: the term “reviewers” for people who conduct and report meta-ethnographies was the preferred term identified from the eMERGe Delphi studies in line with the increasing use of systematic review methodology for qualitative evidence syntheses), peer reviewers, journal editorsand end-users of meta-ethnographies including policy makers and practitioners. The eMERGe guidance also provides a helpful structure for anyone contemplating or con- ducting a meta-ethnography. While the guidance was developed for meta-ethnogra- phy, some of the reporting criteria, such as those relating to stating a review question and reporting literature search and selection strategies, might also be applicable to other forms of qualitative evidence synthesis and thus overlap with the generic ENTREQ guidance for reporting a wide range of qualitative evidence syntheses (Tong et al., 2012). In contrast to eMERGe, ENTREQ does not provide guidance regarding reporting of the complex analytic synthesis processes (Phases 4 – 6) in a meta-ethnogra- phy and did not follow good practice guidance for developing a reporting guideline (Moher et al., 2010), for example, it was not designed with the consensus of a wider community of experts (Flemming et al., 2018; Cunningham et al., in press).
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Improving reporting of Meta-Ethnography : the eMERGe Reporting Guidance

Improving reporting of Meta-Ethnography : the eMERGe Reporting Guidance

The eMERGe reporting guidance is designed for use by researchers conducting a meta-ethnography (referred to throughout as “ reviewers ” : the term “ reviewers ” for people who conduct and report meta-ethnographies was the preferred term identified from the eMERGe Delphi studies in line with the increasing use of systematic review meth- odology for qualitative evidence syntheses), peer reviewers, journal editors, and end-users of meta-ethnographies including policy makers and practitioners. The eMERGe guidance also provides a helpful structure for anyone contemplating or conducting a meta-ethnography. While the guidance was developed for meta-ethnography, some of the reporting criteria, such as those relating to stating a review question and reporting literature search and selec- tion strategies, might also be applicable to other forms of qualitative evidence synthesis and thus overlap with the generic ENTREQ guidance for reporting a wide range of qualitative evidence syntheses [29]. In contrast to eMERGe, ENTREQ does not provide guidance regarding reporting of the complex analytic synthesis processes (Phases 4 – 6) in a meta-ethnography and did not follow good practice guid- ance for developing a reporting guideline [31], for example, it was not designed with the consensus of a wider commu- nity of experts [34, 35].
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Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: The eMERGe reporting guidance

Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: The eMERGe reporting guidance

This guidance has been developed following a rigorous approach in line with and exceeding good practice in creating reporting guidance. It is intended to improve the clarity and completeness of reporting of meta‐ethnographies to facilitate use of their findings to inform the design and delivery of services and interventions in health, social care, and other fields. Qualitative data are essential for conveying people's (e.g., patients, carers, clinicians) experiences and under- standing social processes and it is important that they contribute to the evidence base. Meta ‐ ethnography is an evolving qualitative evidence synthesis methodology with huge potential to contribute evidence for policy and practice. In future, changes to the guidance might be required to encompass methodological advances and accommodate changes identified after evaluation of the impact of the guidance.
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Developing a Code of Behaviour: Guidelines for Schools

Developing a Code of Behaviour: Guidelines for Schools

Absence of bias in the decision-maker would mean, for example that if the child of the Principal was accused of misconduct that might warrant suspension or expulsion, the Principal would not be involved in the decision. Similarly, if the child of a member of the Board of Management was accused of misconduct, that parent would absent themselves from the Board for any consideration of the matter by the Board. The principle of impartiality in decision-making means it is preferable that, where possible, the Principal arranges for another member or members of staff to conduct the investigation and to present a full report on the facts of the case and any other relevant information to the Principal. The Principal is then free to take a view about whether the student did engage in the behaviour and about the sanction, based on the report of the investigation.
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Behaviour and discipline in schools : oral evidence

Behaviour and discipline in schools : oral evidence

For example, in Cambridgeshire they had a huge 700-place pupil referral unit of very low quality with very high levels of permanent exclusions. Actually, we found the pupil referral unit is now only 120 places in size and far more children are being contained successfully in school. I talked to one of the heads about that. I said, “What are you doing? What are your magic formulae that you are putting in place here?” Actually what he said was that some of the solutions are quite simple. You have got a child who constantly disrupts science practical lessons. If he carries on doing it, he could potentially put other children at risk. Potentially he could end up being permanently excluded. Actually paying a teacher a few pounds to stay after school in the evening to teach that child and a couple of other children is a far cheaper and simpler solution, rather than waiting until the child pushes you and pushes you and pushes you, and then reaches the stage when they are permanently excluded. Surrey is doing something similar, and again there are some interesting results, in terms of giving schools the responsibility for commissioning places, and also Leicestershire and Staffordshire; all are telling a positive story on this, but also a complicated story in terms of taking time and negotiations.
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Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: The eMERGe reporting guidance

Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: The eMERGe reporting guidance

wording, merging duplicative standards, and combining standards on similar processes to create 53 items which were discussed in an online workshop and tested in Delphi consensus studies (Lin- stone & Turoff, 2002) with academic and nonacademic potential end users. Two parallel, online Delphi consensus studies with identical questions were conducted: one Delphi for international experts in qualitative methods (comprising editors or researchers with prior meta ‐ ethnography / qualitative evidence synthesis experi- ence) and one for professional / academic and lay people (potential end‐users of meta‐ethnographies). Sixty‐two people (39 experts and 23 professional / lay people) completed all three rounds of the Delphi. Four items failed to reach consensus in both Delphi stud- ies and so were excluded from the final guidance (these were the abstract should ideally differentiate between reported findings of the primary studies and of the synthesis; state the qualitative research expertise of reviewers; state in which order primary study accounts had data extracted from them; state the order in which studies were translated / synthesized). Participants reached consensus that 49 of 53 items should be included in the guid- ance, too many for usable reporting guidance; therefore, further steps were undertaken to condense these items into fewer report- ing criteria.
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Improving reporting of Meta-Ethnography : the eMERGe Reporting Guidance

Improving reporting of Meta-Ethnography : the eMERGe Reporting Guidance

wording, merging duplicative standards, and combining standards on similar processes to create 53 items which were discussed in an online workshop and tested in Delphi consensus studies (Lin- stone & Turoff, 2002) with academic and nonacademic potential end users. Two parallel, online Delphi consensus studies with identical questions were conducted: one Delphi for international experts in qualitative methods (comprising editors or researchers with prior meta ‐ ethnography / qualitative evidence synthesis experi- ence) and one for professional / academic and lay people (potential end‐users of meta‐ethnographies). Sixty‐two people (39 experts and 23 professional / lay people) completed all three rounds of the Delphi. Four items failed to reach consensus in both Delphi stud- ies and so were excluded from the final guidance (these were the abstract should ideally differentiate between reported findings of the primary studies and of the synthesis; state the qualitative research expertise of reviewers; state in which order primary study accounts had data extracted from them; state the order in which studies were translated / synthesized). Participants reached consensus that 49 of 53 items should be included in the guid- ance, too many for usable reporting guidance; therefore, further steps were undertaken to condense these items into fewer report- ing criteria.
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Research on The Practice of Counselling by Guidance Counsellors in Post Primary Schools

Research on The Practice of Counselling by Guidance Counsellors in Post Primary Schools

Ryan (1993) circulated a questionnaire to the 565 members of the IGC and received a response rate of 61%. He presented the problems of adolescents under seven sections, i.e. problems which were home-related, sexually-related, emotionally-related, school-related, crime-related, health-related and religion-related. He referred to school as having ‘taken on the character of being an oasis of stability between an increasingly insecure and unstable family life and an equally uncertain and uninviting marketplace’ (p.79). Guidance counsellors reported that they spent 21% of their time on personal counselling as compared with 40% on career guidance, 28% on classroom teaching and 8% on other official activities. Ryan’s report painted a stark picture of guidance counsellors who described themselves as having ‘just too many people to deal with, too many problems banging on the door, too much unfinished business everywhere’ (Ryan 1993, p. 66). Ryan noted that there were mixed opinions as to what the counselling dimension in schools should entail, with most seeing that the role of career guidance and personal counselling cannot be separated, as a student might go to a guidance counsellor to discuss subject-choice or career- choice, but move quickly to discussing a serious personal issue. This led to Ryan concluding that ‘the real issue appears to be not so much should the school confront these problems, but that no time is allocated to counselling in the school programme’ (Ryan, 1993, p.70).
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Countering bully/victim problems in schools: The role of the Guidance Counsellor

Countering bully/victim problems in schools: The role of the Guidance Counsellor

At the EU level, recent initiatives have focused particularly on cyberbullying as this form of bullying is proving particularly challenging for children, educators, parents, and policy-makers. The CyberTraining Project (www.cybertraining-project.org) provides an online (free) manual for trainers/teachers in relation to countering cyberbullying. The materials are based on the results of needs analyses conducted across partner countries (including Ireland), the perspectives of relevant experts, and assessment of the current ‘situation’ in the partner countries reflecting research and intervention efforts to combat cyberbullying (review chapters regarding the situation in Ireland are freely available). The ‘trainers’ targeted in this project refer to a broad array of professionals with the potential for providing training on this issue, including Guidance Counsellors. The Manual contains seven modules:
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Out-of-Classroom Learning Practical information and guidance for schools and teachers

Out-of-Classroom Learning Practical information and guidance for schools and teachers

a variety of settings… (it) enriches the curriculum and can improve educational attainment.’ In response to the recommendations of that report, the Government are currently working to raise the profile and uptake of opportunities to participate in out-of- classroom learning, and I am looking forward to reading the Department for Education and Skills’ Manifesto for Education Outside the Classroom. The Chancellor announced further support to schools for activities like out-of-classroom learning in his recent Budget. From this September, an extra half a billion pounds will be provided via the School Standards Grant for the personalisation of teaching. One of the suggested areas for spending this money is developing ‘study support opportunities’ such as school trips, particularly by ensuring free access for children from deprived backgrounds who might otherwise miss out.
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Managing behaviour in mainstream schools : changing the culture

Managing behaviour in mainstream schools : changing the culture

I wish to thank the staff of the Northern Area Education Support Service NAESS and the service's users and associates who have contributed to the research; especially the children, paren[r]

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Guidance on managing anti-social behaviour related to Gypsies and Travellers

Guidance on managing anti-social behaviour related to Gypsies and Travellers

communities to deal effectively with the small number of instances where anti- social behaviour does take place. Authorities can also take steps to minimise the risk of anti-social behaviour occurring in the first place. An example of this would be in authorities making effective provision for dealing with known seasonal movement of Gypsies and Travellers. During the summer in particular, large groups of travellers will travel to attend horse fairs and other cultural events. Authorities can minimise the risk of unauthorised encampments on the routes of those events and the potential anti-social behaviour associated with this seasonal movement by providing authorised temporary stopping places and by having in place joint agency protocols to ensure that travellers are made aware of the conduct expected of them while they are present and are provided with hire facilities such as portable toilets and waste disposal.
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Improving reporting of Meta-Ethnography : the eMERGe Reporting Guidance

Improving reporting of Meta-Ethnography : the eMERGe Reporting Guidance

This guidance is not intended as a detailed guide in how to conduct a meta ‐ ethnography — some such publications exist (e.g., 9,41-43,49 ) and others from the eMERGe project are in preparation (see http:// emergeproject.org/publications/). The guidance is designed to raise the reporting quality of meta ‐ ethnographies and thus to assist those writing, reviewing, updating, and using meta ‐ ethnographies in making judgements about quality of meta ‐ ethnography conduct and output. It might also help users of qualitative evidence syntheses to recognize other forms of qualitative evidence synthesis mislabelled as a meta ‐ ethnography, a common occurrence. 25 The guidance does, however, advance the methodology through its comprehensive analysis, inter- pretation and synthesis of methodological publications on meta ‐ ethnography, published since Noblit and Hare's original monograph, which underpin the reporting criteria and explanatory notes.
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Behaviour in Scottish Schools Research 2016

Behaviour in Scottish Schools Research 2016

10.31 Approaches which were embedded in the school ethos were discussed in terms of their positive impact on disruptive behaviours by both primary and secondary staff. Two main approaches were used: nurturing and restorative. Although the nurture approach was implemented differently across schools, a common theme was for pupils who were experiencing difficulties to spend some time out of the classroom, in a calming place, where staff could work with them to address the root cause of their problems. For pupils with chaotic home lives, headteachers also emphasised the importance of ensuring that their basic needs were met before they could be expected to learn and behave in a positive way. This included hygiene, clothing and food as well as provision of equipment such as pencils and the use of ICT if it is not available at home.
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The State of Guidance and Counseling Services in Southwest Ethiopia Secondary Schools

The State of Guidance and Counseling Services in Southwest Ethiopia Secondary Schools

and preventive manner which ensures that all students can achieve school success through academic, career, and personal/social development (American School Counselor Association, 1997). Guidance and counseling service at schools is believed to be effective when it solves the students academic, social and personal problems and also contributes in improving academic performance. High quality school counseling services can help to address students' mental health needs. As discussed by Arudo, Tobias Opiyo Okeyo (2008), school guidance and counseling interventions positively contributes to school behaviors; specifically, students on-task and productive use of time and students in-class discipline. Therefore, guidance and counseling services play a pivotal role in helping students gain the knowledge and skills necessary for them to be able to make good decisions regarding their post-secondary plans.
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