Top PDF How can we increase girls’ uptake of maths and physics A-level?

How can we increase girls’ uptake of maths and physics A-level?

How can we increase girls’ uptake of maths and physics A-level?

There is a large gender gap in the likelihood of taking maths and physics at A-level, even among high-achieving pupils. Among pupils who achieved grade A or A* (equivalent to grades 7-9) in GCSE maths in 2010, 36.5% of girls compared to 51.1% of boys took maths A-level. Among those who achieved grade A or A* in GCSE physics, just 13.2% of girls compared to 39.3% of boys took physics A-level. By contrast, there is almost no gender gap in the likelihood of taking chemistry A-level amongst those who score highly in the subject at GCSE, and girls are actually more likely to take biology A-level than boys. In partnership with the STEM Skills Fund, we conducted a study to understand the barriers that stop girls from taking maths and physics at A-level. This took the form of a small-scale randomised control trial in which girls in Year 11 who were predicted to achieve at least grade 7 (equivalent to at least grade A) in maths, physics or combined science GCSE were offered financial support in return for applying to study physics or maths A-level. As part of this trial, we surveyed 266 girls, as well as a senior staff member across 40 schools, about girls’ A-level subject choices and what drives them. We also conducted four focus groups with 6-8 girls in schools in Bolton, Hull, Birmingham and Portsmouth to discuss these reasons in more detail.
Show more

21 Read more

Maths and physics teacher supply package : March 2017

Maths and physics teacher supply package : March 2017

Overall, feedback from the survey and from the interviews indicates that the courses are well received and judged to be meeting expectations. Quality assurance of provision is overseen by NCTL through termly progress reports and an end of programme impact report. Furthermore, providers are asked to outline their quality assurance processes as part of their application to offer TSST, and are responsible for ongoing quality assurance of their training programme. This is supported by the requirement to offer certification, professional award or Masters credits, but not all providers have yet managed to meet this requirement (particularly in maths), and some providers interviewed would welcome further support in accrediting their TSST programme as discussed in section 5.4.1. Feedback from this evaluation and direct from schools has led to NCTL introducing a national working group of schools and key stakeholders (such as subject-specialist organisations). The working group is looking at the quality and consistency of TSST provision at a national level and will implement a number of measures to reinforce this element of the programme. Although a Knowledge Hub was set up to provide a communication forum for lead schools, and contact details were circulated following the start up meetings for the programme, some providers said they would welcome more opportunities to learn from other TSST providers and to be able to compare strengths and weaknesses. This included learning how other providers approach recruitment, content and delivery.
Show more

160 Read more

Maths and physics teacher supply package

Maths and physics teacher supply package

Overall, feedback from the survey and from the interviews indicates that the courses are well received and judged to be meeting expectations. Quality assurance of provision is overseen by NCTL through termly progress reports and an end of programme impact report. Furthermore, providers are asked to outline their quality assurance processes as part of their application to offer TSST, and are responsible for ongoing quality assurance of their training programme. This is supported by the requirement to offer certification, professional award or Masters credits, but not all providers have yet managed to meet this requirement (particularly in maths), and some providers interviewed would welcome further support in accrediting their TSST programme as discussed in section 5.4.1. Feedback from this evaluation and direct from schools has led to NCTL introducing a national working group of schools and key stakeholders (such as subject-specialist organisations). The working group is looking at the quality and consistency of TSST provision at a national level and will implement a number of measures to reinforce this element of the programme. Although a Knowledge Hub was set up to provide a communication forum for lead schools, and contact details were circulated following the start up meetings for the programme, some providers said they would welcome more opportunities to learn from other TSST providers and to be able to compare strengths and weaknesses. This included learning how other providers approach recruitment, content and delivery.
Show more

161 Read more

Pick a new #lane: how can we increase boys’ participation and interest in literature and language, the arts, nursing, and education and early years?

Pick a new #lane: how can we increase boys’ participation and interest in literature and language, the arts, nursing, and education and early years?

The necessity of such campaigns is supported by both statistics and research. For example, whilst most STEM subjects receive as equal share of male and female entrants at GCSE level, the numbers skew dramatically at A-Level in favour of boys (take Computing 88%, Physics 77%, Economics 68%, and Mathematics 62% as examples; Joint Council for Qualifications, 2018). This trend continues at degree level (e.g., 82% of Computer Science undergraduates are male; HESA, 2017) and in the associated occupations and industries (e.g., only 16% of IT Professionals are women, ONS, 2018). Such patterns are identified as reflections of outdated patriarchal values and roles which label such subjects and professions as ‘better suited’ to men and their associated abilities, which in turn restrict and discourage girls from choosing STEM career paths. Indeed, research supports the idea that agents in the environment (such as parents and teachers) directly shape and influence girls’ choice of subject at school and beyond (see Blakemore, Berendaum & Liben, 2009, for review), and that such messages influence girls’ estimations of their own abilities (which are not reflective of
Show more

7 Read more

Working While Disabled How We Can Help

Working While Disabled How We Can Help

Trial work period—The trial work period allows you to test your ability to work for at least nine months. During your trial work period, you’ll receive your full Social Security benefits regardless of how much you’re earning as long as you report your work, and you continue to have a disability. In 2015, a trial work month is any month your total earnings are over $780. If you’re self-employed, you have a trial work month when you earn more than $780 (after expenses) or work more than 80 hours in your own business. The trial work period continues until you have worked nine months within a 60-month period.
Show more

24 Read more

College Affordability: What Is It and How Can We Measure It?

College Affordability: What Is It and How Can We Measure It?

minds, rather than by weighing all of the facts and figures. If they hear every day that college prices are skyrocketing, that college is out of reach for all but the wealthy, they are likely to believe that. They may have no idea that financial aid is available. The complexity of the aid and pricing systems compounds the problem. How things are framed also matters. The example of the recent proposal in Oregon to “Pay It Forward” is instructive. The proposal would eliminate up- front tuition payments and replace them with the requirement that students pay a percentage of their incomes for a specified number of years after they leave school. The proposal is described as: “Pay It Forward (HB 3472) will provide access for all Oregonians to a debt-free degree and protect funding for public higher education.” 19 A requirement to
Show more

40 Read more

How Can We Respond Effectively to Juvenile Crime?

How Can We Respond Effectively to Juvenile Crime?

ample of the child health policymaking process of the AAP was the joint statement of the AAP and US Public Health Service on the use of a mercury-con- taining preservative called thimerosal in vaccines and recommendations for hepatitis B vaccine admin- istration. The perceived need to address the thimer- osal issue quickly to provide pediatricians with timely recommendations precluded an extensive in- clusive policymaking process. The process used demonstrates that the AAP, the US Public Health Service and other public agencies, and experts from academia can respond quickly and work together in the best interests of our children. This commentary will reflect on how the child health policymaking process of the AAP tried to consider these 4 key principles in its deliberations and understand the possible implications of alternative policy options.
Show more

10 Read more

How can we take care of our commons?

How can we take care of our commons?

This lesson is framed around a book about two little girls who learn what a Commons is, how to take care of a Commons, and the importance of everyone doing their part to keep their Commons healthy and beautiful. Students apply what they have learned from the story by determining how to best take care of their classroom Commons. Students collectively identify goals and rules to keep the classroom Commons healthy, and individually commit to specific actions that they themselves can take to ensure this is the case.

15 Read more

Acute Myeloid Leukemia- How can we fix it?

Acute Myeloid Leukemia- How can we fix it?

which resolves spontaneously. ~20-30% of patients will subsequently develop DS-AML before the age of 4 years.  ii) 500-fold increased risk of developing the AML subtype, acute megaka[r]

15 Read more

How can we save social media data?

How can we save social media data?

Twenty-three respondents (31.5%) said they do not make their data available to others. Thirty- four respondents (46.6%) do make their data available use repositories and websites (see Table 4). Eleven respondents chose “other” when asked “How do you make your data available to others?”, and in those responses, many mentioned restrictions on data sharing imposed by platforms or indicated that they would be willing to share data directly with researchers who asked. For instance, they indicated, “code is on GitHub, they can request data” or “they will receive an external hard drive with the data” and “We can directly share signals we calculate from that data, but not the social media data itself” or “We make data available on a case-by- case basis, given platform Terms of Service.” Respondents who used repositories or archives to share their data listed their university’s institutional repositories (N=3), Github (N=3), Figshare (N=2), and ICPSR (N=1).
Show more

33 Read more

How Can We Mitigate Capture in Financial Regulation?

How Can We Mitigate Capture in Financial Regulation?

The first section of the publication invites contributions from the academic community. Lawrence Baxter (Chapter 2) discusses the ‘elusive nature’ of the concept of capture in financial regulation and identifies different mechanisms to mitigate its extent. Daniel Carpenter, David Moss and Melanie Wachtell Stinnett (Chapter 3) discuss the lessons for financial regulatory policymaking from a recent collaborative project (Preventing Regulatory Capture: Special Interest Influence, and How to Limit It), arguing that capture is both less absolute and more preventable than is typically recognized. Stefano Pagliari and Kevin Young (Chapter 4) empirically analyse the different business groups and other stakeholders that make up the rulemaking phase in financial regulation and examine potential mitigating strategies emerging from the unique ecology of interest groups that characterize financial regulatory policymaking. The analysis by
Show more

50 Read more

How can we recognize continuous quality improvement?

How can we recognize continuous quality improvement?

This study has limitations. First, an online expert panel ap- proach cannot be assumed to be identical to an in-person panel. The online panel, however, enabled broader validation of the work of our previous in-person international panel; therefore, our study included both panel methods. Moreover, online panelists were generally satis fi ed with the panel process, found it interesting, easy to use and helpful [25]. Second, while we had some international participants in the ExpertLens process, our sampling aimed at North America. While further work involving the many active CQI researchers and practi- tioners in other countries is needed, our electronic search strategy yielded many international CQI studies, and the ter- minology use in these studies is re fl ected in the panel and reli- ability work leading up to the online panel. Third, our results may depend in part on how we phrased CQI features, rather than on the features themselves; panelists disagreed with some of our wording. The wording used, however, represents both in-person panel input and several years of work developing a reliable literature abstraction tool [18, 19, 26, 27]. Finally, our participants raised the issue that the terms CQI and QI may be used interchangeably. Our prior work shows the diversity of QI interventions, however, and suggests that distinguishing CQI from the broader term QI will be useful [19, 26].
Show more

10 Read more

How Can We Help Minority Nursing Students?

How Can We Help Minority Nursing Students?

My first step in this endeavor was to search the literature. A graduate assistant using keywords such as academic failure, clinical failure, and minority nursing students found articles for me. After reading approximately 25 nursing journal articles on working with minority, ESL, and at-risk students, I put together a program. Before starting the program, I met with the student to get to know her better and to discuss our relationship and expectations. I knew her to be a quiet unassuming person and I wanted to make sure we would be suited to each other. We had a nice conversation about her background and aspirations. She admitted feeling somewhat invisible and culturally isolated as mentioned by Yoder [6] . She seemed to have adequate family and financial support which I knew to be important for Mexican-American students. Taxis reported on a study of nine Mexican-American students and concluded that ongoing social support from family and peers and financial support were crucial to these students [15] .
Show more

9 Read more

Can we improve how we screen applicants of initial teacher education?

Can we improve how we screen applicants of initial teacher education?

Identifying foundation attributes. The process for identifying the foundation attributes on which the SJT was built followed an integrated inductive and deductive approach (e.g., Guenole, Chernyshenko, & Weekly, 2017; Schubert et al., 2008; Weekley, Ployhart, & Holtz, 2006). The majority of SJTs are developed using an inductive approach where the key attributes are identi fi ed during the content development process (Campion, Ployhart, & MacKenzie, 2014). In this approach, researchers work with ex- perts to identify critical incidents related to the fi eld of interest, and subsequently assign inductive categories to the content. In contrast, SJTs developed using a deductive approach identify target attri- butes before the content development process and develop content that represents the targeted attributes (e.g., Guenole et al., 2017). We used an integrated ‘construct-informed’ (or construct-driven; Lievens, 2017) inductive and deductive approach, in which three non-cognitive attributes emerged from a series of interviews with experts (i.e., ‘bottom-up’), and three non-cognitive attributes were targeted a priori based on existing theories (‘top-down’). The three inductive attributes d adaptability, organization, and empa- thy d were previously developed through a multi-step inductive process reported in Klassen & Tze, 2014, Klassen et al., 2017. The three deductive attributes d conscientiousness, growth mindset, and emotion regulation d were chosen through a review of relevant literature and through a series of discussions with ITE program staff. Conscientiousness was chosen as a target attribute because it has been shown to be one of the Big Five personality domains most related to teacher effectiveness (e.g., Kim, Dar-Nimrod, & MacCann, 2018; Kim & MacCann, 2018); growth mindset was chosen because of the increasing recognition that teachers ’ beliefs in fl uence how students perceive their learning (e.g., Seaton, 2017), and emotion regulation was chosen because teacher emotions and emotion regulation are related to a range of important teaching-related outcomes (e.g., Chang, 2013; Sutton, 2004; Taxer & Gross, 2018). The six non-cognitive attributes were used as a guide in the crea- tion of scenarios of the SJT.
Show more

12 Read more

The Equifax Breach: What We Learned and How We Can Protect Consumer Data

The Equifax Breach: What We Learned and How We Can Protect Consumer Data

Equifax breach unveiled anything, it is that everyone’s data could have already been compromised. That means their information is already in the hands of unauthorized parties. These are details that need to be clarified in order to create make a more practical piece of legislation. We do not want to open the floodgates for numerous meritless actions that the bill’s ambiguous language might allow.

15 Read more

Simple but effective LIS research: why we need it, and how we can do it

Simple but effective LIS research: why we need it, and how we can do it

almost before account has been taken of any other considerations. Just what the topic requires in terms of data, and how that data might best be assembled, seem all too often to be missed out in the rush to survey some people, somewhere, about something or other that might or might not be helpful. Maybe teachers of research methods concentrate their teaching hours on questionnaire surveys because they are genuinely a difficult form to use and do require that neophyte researchers receive a good deal of instruction. Designing a good questionnaire, identifying and contacting an appropriate survey population, and organising and interpreting survey data are none of them easy. However, it doesn’t look like that is the reason for concentrating on surveys. Surveys actually seem to have been identified as an easy method, but one which will be accepted as meeting the standards of what constitutes ‘proper’ research.
Show more

6 Read more

A protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility study of an adolescent incentive intervention to increase uptake of HPV vaccination among girls

A protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility study of an adolescent incentive intervention to increase uptake of HPV vaccination among girls

Feasibility outcomes collected prior to interventions be- ing administered include the schools’ and parents’ will- ingness to participate in the study and the schools’ willingness to be randomised (number of schools con- tacted, number of those who express initial interest, and number of those who participate). Feasibility outcomes collected following interventions being administered include response rates to questionnaires by the parents and girls and data completeness regarding the proportion of missing data, girls’ and parents’ socio- demographic characteristics (including ethnicity, ascer- tained through brief questionnaires, and index of multiple deprivation (IMD) score, ascertained using the girls’ postcodes provided by the schools). We will also explore the girls’ and parents’ attitudes towards the in- centive offered (assessed through brief questionnaires, measure developed for this study) and school staff expe- riences of participating (ascertained through brief inter- views). Data on unintended consequences and mechanisms of effect will be collected via questionnaires. Unintended consequences include the girls’ perceptions of why an incentive was offered, the girls’ attitudes towards returning future consent forms (measures devel- oped for this study) and whether parents made an in- formed decision about vaccination (using questions described in [26]). Mechanisms of effect include whether the incentive increased motivation for returning the con- sent form, improved memory for returning the form, in- creased salience for returning the form, increased the short-term benefits of returning the form, increased the perceived value of returning the form and whether there is a role for girls fearing missing out on the incentive (using [38] and measures developed for this study). Trial procedures will be documented by speaking to the school staff about their fidelity to the intervention (ascertained through brief interviews) and taking a de- tailed description of immunisation processes performed in each school (i.e. what additions to the standard invita- tion were performed) by the immunisation teams and school staff (ascertained through brief interviews with school staff and email/telephone conversations with im- munisation teams throughout the trial). Cost of the in- centive intervention will be assessed by measuring (1)
Show more

9 Read more

How can we measure Scotland’s footprint? (and, once we have, what do we do with it?)

How can we measure Scotland’s footprint? (and, once we have, what do we do with it?)

This article has raised questions regarding the accurate and useful calculation of ecological and/or carbon footprints for Scotland. However, it is clear that a number of developments are already underway in Scotland to enhance our analytical capacity in terms of accounting for the environmental impacts of our behaviour and how we may improve our performance. Nonetheless, it is crucial that we continue to direct our efforts, and our public resources, in ways that will ultimately yield the most benefits. The core argument put forward here is that we must continue to invest in the informational and analytical infrastructure, even if this means delaying actual
Show more

6 Read more

What can I do with my maths degree? Careers advice for maths undergraduates

What can I do with my maths degree? Careers advice for maths undergraduates

As a mathematician you are unlikely to find many jobs labelled ’mathematician’ within an engineering company and are much more likely to be known as an engineer once you work there. Some engineering companies do recruit maths graduates directly, and it is worth visiting a careers fair and asking the engineering companies about the openings which they have. Have a look at www.mathscareers.org.uk -> undergraduates -> who employs maths graduates for a list of engineering companies who employ maths graduates. There are of course many other roles within engineering companies, such as in management, finance and statistics which would also be open to maths graduates.
Show more

24 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...