Top PDF Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and the Role of Social Workers

Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and the Role of Social Workers

Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and the Role of Social Workers

In these discussions, used the term 'indigenous peoples', which is a term officially used by the United Nations, multilateral agencies and institutions as well as working groups in international forums. The United Nations itself does not impose these terms to member countries, does not give a clear definition of indigenous peoples, and give freedom to each country to construct the definition according to the needs and context of each country. In Indonesia used the term Indigenous Peoples Customary Law and Remote Indigenous Communities (Arizona, 2016; Kleden, 2017; SAFE and AIPP, 2017); Malaysia used the term Orang Asli (Abdullah, Borhan & Ahmad, 2015); Maori in New Zealand, Aboriginal Peoples in Canada (Cornell, 2006).
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Role of Social Workers in Facilitating of the Poverty Alleviation Program in Indonesia

Role of Social Workers in Facilitating of the Poverty Alleviation Program in Indonesia

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ This paper aims to describe the idea of the professionalization of handling the poor in Indonesia, namely through the establishment of a social worker assistant the poor. Poor Social Worker Companion who is a professional social worker was appointed assistant the poor. Professionalization companion deemed urgent. The poor handling challenge because it is more difficult. The fact is: 1) the number of poor people in Indonesia is still high; 2) the pace of decline slowed down the number of poor people; 3) There are a large number of residents are not poor are vulnerable to fall back into poverty. On the other hand, the poor management program through its joint (Kube) has not been effective enough. Recent research shows that only 40 percent Kube established in 2013 is still active when checked 30 months later. This finding is in line with the results of evaluations conducted since decades ago. This condition is alarming and needs improving the poor handling system significantly. One of the components is seen as strategic human resources. Suggested remedies are by appointment professional social workers to become a partner. The social worker assigned duties and functions facilitate the handling of the poor in a certain area within a certain time. The function of the social worker suggested the poor companion is: a) guide the community to collect data on available data the poor by name by address in its territory; b) verification and validation of data the poor; c) selecting program participants the poor handling; d) perform reference handling the poor; e) advocate for the Poor that all rights are met; f) The poor family counseling; g) make public the guidance in the handling of the Poor; h) monitoring and evaluating the progress of the Poor; i) make the case record the poor family; and h) report on the implementation of tasks. The social worker is deemed appropriate to perform this task because they are trained to help people meet their mission needs, support, knowledge, values , and skills.
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Riding for Survival: A Worst Form of Human Trafficking

Riding for Survival: A Worst Form of Human Trafficking

Although the alleviation of poverty, provision of education to the mothers, the change of value system about the child labour, the role of social workers, in mentally preparing the children as well as the parents, can’t solve the social and economic problems of these jockey children over night yet by implementing a careful short term as well as long term policy, we can solve this issue to a large extent. Moreover, it was observed that effective prevention requires family empowerment, basic education, capacity building, awareness raising and social mobilization. Rehabilitation measures should seek to offer different solutions and provide a comprehensive socio- economic package of services encompassing education, health and nutrition, social protection and shelter.
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Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science

Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science

This study was conducted to assess the health and social economic status of Lanoh ethic sub-group of Orang Asli (indigenous peoples) in Air Bah I village, Malaysia. A one day study which involved health screening and structured interview was conducted on 16 April 2011. Forty five Orang Asli participated in the health screening. Fifteen subjects were newly discovered to have high blood pressure while 5 subjects had high blood glucose level. Only 37.8 % had normal body mass index and 26.7 % were pre-obese. Thirteen subjects were interviewed about their health seeking behavior and knowledge of the proper use of medications. Slightly more than half (53.8 %) of the subjects was uneducated and 69.2 % were rubber tappers with the median monthly household income of RM 400 (USD 122.31). Approximately 77 % of the subjects had visited the health centre for body checkups. The utilization of herbs as medications (23.1 %) was common and the majority (76.9 %) said that traditional medications were safe compared to modern medications. Around 46 % of Orang Asli had the opinion that medications should be kept in the refrigerator and exposed places and 61.5 % shared medications with others. In conclusion, the Lanoh are still categorized under the poverty group and their education level remains low. Therefore, education intervention is necessary to improve their knowledge on the proper use of medications. Key words:
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Legitimacy and Resistance against Foreign Saniri Community Dynamics Tulehu, Jazirah Leihitu Central Maluku District

Legitimacy and Resistance against Foreign Saniri Community Dynamics Tulehu, Jazirah Leihitu Central Maluku District

In order to reframe local autonomy, the local government of indigenous peoples, in this case the traditional institutions can explore and optimize the existing social capital and developed in the community that is a set of values, rules and norms, people have access to the management of social capital, which is done in order institutional strengthening of indigenous, social, economic and political. At her course towards an autonomous community, capable of taking policy on the ground and is not dependent on the upper level policy instruments. Similarly, the local base should also be strengthened with the ethical political system (political norms) that underlies the entire process of policy making and implementation. Where the political system is based on the ethical principle of solidarity, providing space for community participation based on traditional values and norms, known as egalitarian democracy. Saniri State as a traditional institution in society, it makes base egalitarian as a collective spirit. The appearance of the container in the original forum State Tulehu Saniri sort of meeting, large Saniri meeting (attended by all people young and old) to the meeting soa, is part of the egalitarian spirit. Context is then led to the political system of a democratic society, have an important role as a supporter of the establishment of an autonomous civil society.
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The Role of MARA (The Council of Trust for Indigenous Peoples) in Enforcing Affirmative Action in Malaysia

The Role of MARA (The Council of Trust for Indigenous Peoples) in Enforcing Affirmative Action in Malaysia

Malaysia is one of a few countries in which a majority and politically dominant ethnic group, the Bumiputera1 were socially excluded and economically in the aftermath of colonial rule. Bumiputera under-representation in tertiary education institutions and upper occupational positions, and in ownership and control over economic activity, were starker in Malaysia than in most nations that implement forms of affirmative action. Post-independence Malaya was characterized by a social structure, aptly described as an ethnic division of labour, in which groups were preponderantly and persistently confined to particular occupations and industries. Through British colonial rule and migration processes, foreign interests came to dominate the ownership of resources and capital, while Malays, Chinese and Indians, lived and worked in separate geographic and economic spheres. Ethnic social stratification was reinforced by disparities in educational and job opportunities. One of the affirmative action been taken by the government is the establishment of MARA (The Council of Trust for Indigenous Peoples) in 1966. Under the tertiary education, MARA (Council of Trust for the Indigenous People) set up junior residential colleges primarily for pupils in rural and unprivileged areas which enjoyed higher standards of teaching and facilities, especially in science classes. Throughout the years, MARA has established many other institutions too in order to increase the social mobility of the Bumiputera. MARA has played the main role as a statutory body in helping Malaysia to perform an affirmative action.
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Stephen Grant Baines, “Social Anthropology with Indigenous Peoples in Brazil, Canada and Australia”

Stephen Grant Baines, “Social Anthropology with Indigenous Peoples in Brazil, Canada and Australia”

post-graduate studies, as was the case in previous periods. In all three coun- tries there has been an increasing involvement of anthropologists in experi- ences of social intervention over this same period, including participation in land claims, environmental impact reports for large-scale development pro- jects, consultancy work for government and non-government organisations, such as the National Indian Foundation (FUNAI), the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), the Socio-environmental Institute (Instituto Socioambiental - ISA), and the Centre for Indigenist Work (Centro de Trabalho Indigenista - CTI), in Brazil. In both Canada and Australian many anthropologists undertake consultancy for indigenous communities, non-government and government organisations, and for the mining sector. This social involvement has led anthropology into dilemmas at the same time that it has contributed to the strengthening of research with indigenous peoples. The challenges which anthropologists face have led to the emergence of new issues and theoretical developments, with new collaborative and participatory research, widening the horizons of anthropology as an academic discipline, such as participatory demarcation of indigenous lands (Oliveira, J. P.; Iglesias 2002). The old role of the anthropologist as intermediary and spokesperson between indigenous peoples and the state has been replaced by that of an assessor who establishes a dialogical posture of political commitment with the indigenous people (s) he works with, respecting their opinions and decisions (Oliveira, J. P. 2009). There has also been an increasing effort among indigenous peoples in- volved in indigenous political movements in all three countries to qualify academically and thereby face the national society using its own instruments to help bring into effect indigenous rights. In Brazil the demand for academic education has been more recent than in Canada and Australia and, over the past decade, it has increased very rapidly (Baniwa 2009). Many indigenous leaders who participate in the administration of indigenous organisations are highly educated persons, and a few are anthropologists. Ramos emphasizes the substantial change in the political role of indigenous people over the past forty years (Ramos 2010). Nevertheless, this author points out that symmetri- cal relations in research with indigenous peoples will only come into effect “when academic and indigenous ideas are mutually fertilised, generating new understanding on both sides” 6 (2010: 41).
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Cree Elders’ Perspectives on Land-Based Education: A Case Study

Cree Elders’ Perspectives on Land-Based Education: A Case Study

Indigenous peoples, communities, and nations are concerned with protecting and preserving the environment and their cultural values and understandings. Indigenous peoples are also concerned with reproducing cultural teachings. As Hansen and Antsanen (2016) note, the Elders “still teach us that the land should not be sold or destroyed” (p. 3). Thus, Indigenous land-based education has functioned to socialize community members into Indigenous society and to respect the land. In spite of the above, Western school systems have failed to develop Indigenous students’ potential because of generations of colonial approaches to education. Simply put, many Indigenous students are not taught about collective Indigenous values and teachings. In conventional education, Elders often play a marginal role in the teaching of Indigenous students. Consequently, many Indigenous students do not develop their educational potential and do not identify with either Indigenous culture or mainstream culture. The Elders suggest that land-based education has the potential to develop students in ways that promote their individual and community well-being. Research Methods Including the Voices and Knowledge of the Elders
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Ethnicity, Indigeneity and Indigenous Rights: The ‘Orang Asli’ Experience

Ethnicity, Indigeneity and Indigenous Rights: The ‘Orang Asli’ Experience

Although there have been judicial pronouncements which have: (1) demonstrated a liberal approach in determining whether Orang Asli customary land rights claimants fulfilled the definitions of an ‘aborigine’ and ‘aboriginal ethnic group’ as contained in ss 3(1) and 2 respectively; 69 and (2) advocated a liberal approach in interpreting the provisions of the APA, 70 there is no guarantee that the federal executive or for that matter, the courts will interprete this provision liberally in the future. Terms such as ‘aboriginal, ‘way of life’ and ‘social organisation’, if interpreted narrowly or in a manner intolerant of changes in aboriginal customs, traditions, society and culture, 71 may result in a person or community losing legal status as an Orang Asli. It is remarkable that the legal definition of ‘Orang Asli’ remains pliable despite executive and judicial recognition of Orang Asli as a distinct ethnic group, 72 suggesting that the issues that Orang Asli face in realising their rights as Indigenous peoples go well beyond legal considerations.
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NEED ASSESSMENT OF CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION IN    THE CULTURE HOUSES (CULTURAL CENTERS) OF CITY Mohammad    Tavakkoli zadeh,  Mohammad Hossein Moshref    Javadi

NEED ASSESSMENT OF CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION IN THE CULTURE HOUSES (CULTURAL CENTERS) OF CITY Mohammad Tavakkoli zadeh,  Mohammad Hossein Moshref Javadi

The present study aims to investigate needs of education of a culture of citizenship in Isfahan in Cultural centers. The statistical research society all citizens of a member of the Culture Houses in the city of Isfahan to the number of persons were 14078 meanwhile, the number of sample size formulas through 374 Cochrane and estimation through the method of random sampling proportional to size was selected. Information gathering tool was a questionnaire made its formal validity and content approval and validity it was estimated by cronbach's alpha is equal to 0.95, p. For the analysis of the t-test was used to test the Friedman. The results showed that religious training in dimension-ranked highest beliefs related to average a "learn to read the Koran", "education and practices of education denies," "eulogy, Requiem was reading French ". On the relationship between education and social interactions then the highest average ratings corresponding to "teach reverence for the clientele," "training," "marital education reverence has been" clientele. Cultural heritage education in the dimension highest average ratings corresponding to the cultural and artistic education entrepreneurs, "the training of Aboriginal art and cultural products", "social relations and Culture Houses training schools" was. The next training in citizen engagement (cultural, social, political, the highest average ratings corresponding to the "sport", "training of individual security, family education," fighting drugs was training".
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The role of economic and political measures of the palliation of poverty in Croatia

The role of economic and political measures of the palliation of poverty in Croatia

Education is the most important determinant of employability – in Croatia more highly educated persons find jobs more easily and faster – but also doubtlessly carries ancillary non-market effects (for example, easier access to information, greater care for personal health, more active participation in social life which encourages responsible democratic civic behaviour, election of democratic authorities and actualization of the rule of law). Non-participation in education is especially dangerous for the children of poor citizens. According to the World Bank (2001), the children of the poor in Croatia are very likely to drop out of the schooling system early, and differences in access to higher education are now very stark. The lack of access to levels of education that are highly valued on the market tends to lower their employability and increase the danger of staying in poverty. These factors perpetuate existing inequalities in earning prospects between the poor and non-poor and create the potential for the intergenerational persis- tence of poverty. A considerable number of youths in Croatia drop out of secondary and higher educational institutions. This is, among other reasons, caused by a serious lack of a network of “second chance” schools, aimed at young people who have either been excluded from education or are on the verge of exclusion. High drop-out rates drive up the costs per graduate. The school drop-out rate should be reduced, and an apprentice- ship system should be created or the existing system improved.
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Vol 1, No 2 (2016)

Vol 1, No 2 (2016)

Nayub comes from the word tayub, consists of two words that Mataya which means dance and guyub which means in harmony together. It is estimated that there is a change of two words into one word, ma-ta-ya and gu-yub be tayub [6], while in-tayub mean invited to dance [7]. Tayub Dance is an art of rituals as a from of gratitude for the fertility of the natural results. Society lives are still dominated by an agrarian culture. This reflects ledhek dancers have an important role in rituals for fertility and safety. Fertility associated with the harvest often sassociated with Dewi Sri or Goddess of Fertility. According to local belief is compulsory dance Tayub ceremony staged in order Ibadan, when dance Tayub is not staged the ceremony will be invalid and is believed will bring disaster pageblug (heavy rain) [8].
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Methodologies for conducting research in an indigenous context

Methodologies for conducting research in an indigenous context

Indigenous Peoples having been adopted in 2008; although Article 33 of the Declaration does state that “Indigenous peoples have the right to determine their own identity or membership in accordance with their customs and traditions”. There has, however, been a definition provided by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO draft glossary, 2002); those that are indigenous are “a group, community or custom that is generally considered to belong to a certain region or country and which cannot be shown to have originated elsewhere.” Indigenous people are defined as “a group of people belonging to a certain country or region which is distinguished from other groups by language, customs and attitudes.”
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Complete Issue

Complete Issue

The social order mentioned above is based on Western and colonial ideologies of patriarchy that underpin the play despite its female authorship. The script houses a patriarchal point of view through Killer and Police Officer. Killer’s character, a White male, makes no apology for his intentions towards his victim, the Indigenous Dying Woman. After brutalizing his victim, Killer places the woman on a hook, prompting associations to the practice of slaughtering and butchering pigs for market. Such graphic imagery revives the harmful misconception that MMIW are not only dispensable but also trafficable, and is egregiously detrimental to the Indigenous communities and families of MMIW who have to deal with this supposition. What’s more, within the scope of this social order, the Indigenous male is not involved in the Pig Girl narrative—he is not given a voice nor any representation and is omitted from the conversation altogether. Indigenous scholar Lee Maracle (1996) has commented on “things” such as this play, noting that “the dictates of racism are that Native men are beneath white women and Native females are not fit to be referred to as [thriving] women. ... The dictates of patriarchy demand that beneath the Native male comes the Native female” (p. 17). In Pig Girl, the Native male is out of sight, out of mind; he is erased by not being acknowledged nor represented in any way. This again evokes Bernstein’s (2011) notion of calling on historical components wherein scripts of mis/non-representation are often brought about from places of privilege.
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Employers and employees – on both sides of the ‘minimum wages’ barricade

Employers and employees – on both sides of the ‘minimum wages’ barricade

Supporters of minimum wages (mostly trade unions) consider them an important measure improving the standard of living of workers. Their opponents believe that imposing a minimum wage increases unemployment among low-skilled workers (2010; Manning, 2016). Taking into account both points of view, it should be noted that the effect of the minimum wage depends on the level at which it is established and whether it results in a significant change in income differentiation. If its amount is small, it will have a slight negative effect on employment in general and the employment of low-skilled workers, but it will also have a low positive effect on reducing poverty among workers. Otherwise, if the amount is high, it will have a significant impact in both respects. If the fixed amount of the minimum wage corresponds to labor productivity, there will be no
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The Challenges of Indigenous Peoples: spectacle or politics?

The Challenges of Indigenous Peoples: spectacle or politics?

Sullivan, Patrick 1996 All Free Man Noll': Culture, Communi0' and Politics in the Kimberley Region, North-TVestern Australia, Canberra: Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Stra[r]

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The Challenges of Indigenous Peoples: spectacle or politics?

The Challenges of Indigenous Peoples: spectacle or politics?

Acknowledgements We wish to express our deep gratitude to Marcia Langton, Foundation Chair of Australian Indigenous Studies at the University of Melbourne, who co coordinated with us the[r]

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Adaptation pathways and opportunities for Indigenous peoples

Adaptation pathways and opportunities for Indigenous peoples

Indigenous cultures are highly dynamic and in the Australian context exist within a postcolonial frame in which the nation-state has overarching sovereign power (Smith and Hunt 2008). Nevertheless, the main trend in Aboriginal cultural change over the last decade has been towards a resurgence of traditionally-derived distinctive culture. Key drivers of this general change include the formation of alliances made possible by the advent of land rights and native title, an Aboriginal cultural turn amongst Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people, and changing (more community-oriented) approaches to regional development (Jones and Birdsall-Jones 2013). In the NRM context, increasing formal involvement by Indigenous peoples is one of four stand-out trends over the last decade (State of the Environment Committee 2011). Six drivers underpin this trend: customary obligations; Indigenous leadership to secure their NRM roles; recognition of Indigenous rights to country; markets for NRM services; increased co-management arrangements; and
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The Whiteness of Redmen: Indigenous Mascots, Social media and an Antiracist Intervention

The Whiteness of Redmen: Indigenous Mascots, Social media and an Antiracist Intervention

Drawing from Faludi’s concept of backlash, co-author and Cree scholar Alex Wilson (2010) describes her understanding of what that “something worse” might be. Wilson analyses and discusses how continued efforts to undermine feminism have a particular and specific effect on the lives and bodies of Indigenous women and two-spirit people. Wilson purports that the sexualisation and normalisation of violence in North America leads to “whiplash” or a negative reaction to positive advancements in Indigenous, queer, and environmental rights. That is, Indigenous women and two-spirit people feel the brunt of the force of an intersectional whiplash. There is precision, targeting and physical violence of a whip cracking (Wilson 2010). This is something that organisers of Idle No More and other recent social media campaigns know all too well. As the #ChangeRedmen campaign gained more visibility, the attacks via social media on individual women and two-spirit people who were part of the campaign increased (E. Lee, personal communication June 2013; S. McLean, personal communication June 2013; Wilson 2015). The topic of Indigenous feminisms itself became a target both of mainstream whiplashers and even within Indigenous communities on Facebook, on Twitter, on online commentary and in real life.
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A protocol for a systematic literature review: comparing the impact of seasonal and meteorological parameters on acute respiratory infections in Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples

A protocol for a systematic literature review: comparing the impact of seasonal and meteorological parameters on acute respiratory infections in Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples

OR Tripura OR Tsaatan OR Tsachila OR Tsou OR Tsumkwe OR Tshwa OR Tuareg OR Tuaregare OR Tubolar OR Tubu OR Tugen OR Tukano OR Tupi OR Tutong OR Tutsi OR “ Tuvin-Todjin ” OR Twa OR Tyua OR “ Tz ’ utujil ” OR Tzeltal OR Tzotzil OR Uchay OR Udege OR Ulchi OR “ Ureueu-Wau-Wau ” OR Uru OR Uspanteko OR Vadda OR Vadema OR Vai OR Veddhas OR Veps OR Vyadha OR “ Waaniy-a-Laato ” OR Waata OR Wadoma OR Wagashi OR Wapaichana OR Waorani OR Wapixana OR Warao OR Warrau OR “ Warrau Wayana ” OR Wayampi OR Wayana OR Wayeyi OR Wayuu OR Wichi OR Wodaabe OR Wounaan OR Xinka OR Yaaku OR Yami OR Yamana OR Yanomami OR Yukpa OR Yvytoso OR Zamuco OR Zapara OR Zapotec OR “ !Xoo ” OR “ // ’ Xauesi ” OR “ /Xaisa ” OR “‘ Akateco ” OR ((Indigenous OR Aboriginal OR Native) AND (Ache OR Algonquin OR Amis OR Bedouin OR Bugle OR Bushmen OR Dakota OR Dan OR Fang OR Herder OR Herdsmen OR Indian* OR Karen OR Maroon OR Mohawk OR Mon OR pastoralist* OR Papua OR Pear OR Potters OR Pygmy OR Pygymy OR Rade OR Roma OR Sab OR Squamish OR Tay OR Trio OR Yucatan))
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